Economic & Social History 1A: Towards Globalisation, c1750-1914 ESH1001

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 1 (SCQF level 7)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

This course charts the emergence of a global economy and society from around 1750 through to the First World War. After looking at pre-industrial economy and society, the course explores the development of a recognisably modern world through the nineteenth century, not only in terms of manufacturing and trade, but also the growth of cities, financial institutions, labour organisation, leisure activities and family relationships. The changes in all these areas are tracked from Britain, 'the cradle of the industrial revolution', to Europe, and then the wider world. National histories are placed in an international perspective and rapid transitions against the background of long-term trends.

 

Students will be introduced to major questions in history such as the conditions for economic growth, the relationship between economic and social change, and the global transmission of both stability and instability. They will also be introduced to primary sources, which are the basis for all historical knowledge, and be taught critical analysis of secondary literature. The course also aims to foster skills in academic writing and debate as well as group working and discussion.

 

Levels 1A and 1B are built around the same key themes: international economic relations, labour and the workplace, social order and conflict, gender and the family, leisure and consumption, migration and community; in Britain, Europe, the USA and Japan, with some coverage of other regions. The course content and assessment allow for progression. However, they can also be taken as stand-alone courses.

Timetable

Lectures: 3pm on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, weeks 1 - 10.

Tutorials: one hour weekly, weeks 1 - 10.

Provision for a reading week: week 5 or 6.

Requirements of Entry

None

Assessment

Analysis of a historical article (500 words) = 15%

One essay (1,500 words +/- 10%) = 35%

One examination (answer two questions out of 14) = 50%

Main Assessment In: December

Course Aims

This course charts the emergence of a global economy and society from around 1750 through to the First World War. After looking at pre-industrial economy and society, the course explores the development of a recognisably modern world through the nineteenth century, not only in terms of manufacturing and trade, but also the growth of cities, financial institutions, labour organisation, leisure activities and family relationships. The changes in all these areas are tracked from Britain, 'the cradle of the industrial revolution', to Europe, and then the wider world. National histories are placed in an international perspective and rapid transitions against the background of long-term trends.

 

Students will be introduced to major questions in history such as the conditions for economic growth, the relationship between economic and social change, and the global transmission of both stability and instability. They will also be introduced to primary sources, which are the basis for all historical knowledge, and be taught critical analysis of secondary literature. The course also aims to foster skills in academic writing and debate as well as group working and discussion.

 

Levels 1A and 1B are built around the same key themes: international economic relations, labour and the workplace, social order and conflict, gender and the family, leisure and consumption, migration and community; in Britain, Europe, the USA and Japan, with some coverage of other regions. The course content and assessment allow for progression. However, they can also be taken as stand-alone courses.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of the course, both in their written work and in tutorial discussion, students should be able to:

1. demonstrate knowledge of the main features of economic and social change from around 1750 to 1914 at a national and international level

2. identify and assess the factors which encourage or retard economic growth in different national contexts

3. explain the relationship between social and economic change in the context of industrialisation and globalisation

4. integrate analysis of gender, race and class into discussions of economic and social change

5. demonstrate ability to assess alternative explanations of key events in Economic and Social History with appropriate reference to the secondary literature

6. provide appropriate historical evidence for their arguments.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

To submit both pieces of coursework and to sit the final examination or, if appropriate, the resit examination.