Please note: there may be some adjustments to the teaching arrangements published in the course catalogue for 2020-21. Given current circumstances related to the Covid-19 pandemic it is anticipated that some usual arrangements for teaching on campus will be modified to ensure the safety and wellbeing of students and staff on campus; further adjustments may also be necessary, or beneficial, during the course of the academic year as national requirements relating to management of the pandemic are revised.

Embodiments: Literature And Medicine 1750-1900 ENGLIT5013

  • Academic Session: 2020-21
  • School: School of Critical Studies
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 5 (SCQF level 11)
  • Typically Offered: Either Semester 1 or Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes

Short Description

'Embodiments' aims to introduce students to a wide historical perspective by moving from the mid-eighteenth to the late nineteenth century. It seeks to explore critical approaches and theoretical models of relevance when addressing literary representations of embodiment and related medical discourses, and to encourage students to engage in independent interdisciplinary research in the fields of literature and medicine, as well as introducing them to the growing field of disability studies. By considering a wide range of texts from a variety of different genres, students will be enabled to identify and examine shifts in medical discourse across time and the changing ways in which literary and medical writers interact as medicine becomes a more professionalized and specialised discourse.

Timetable

10 x weekly seminars 1.5 hours
Individual feedback meetings with tutors

Requirements of Entry

Standard entry to Masters at College level.

Excluded Courses

n/a

Co-requisites

n/a

Assessment

Essay of up to 5000 words

Course Aims

The course aims to:

■ introduce students to critical approaches and theoretical models of relevance when addressing literary representations of embodiment and related medical discourses

■ encourage students to engage in independent interdisciplinary research in the fields of literature and medicine, as well as introducing them to the growing field of disability studies

■ enable students to identify and examine shifts in medical discourse across time and the changing ways in which literary and medical writers interact as medicine becomes a more professionalized and specialized discourse.

■ highlight both change and continuity and by including texts from different literary 'periods' also raise questions about periodization: is 'Romantic' medicine different to 'Victorian' medicine, and is the body read and interpreted in different ways within different historical contexts?

■ raise important questions about gender, sexuality, race and class and their perceived relations to the pathologized body.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
-relate new theoretical approaches to literature, medicine and embodiment to eighteenth and nineteenth-century literature and culture.

-set texts in various historical and literary contexts in the period, particularly in relation to medical discourse, and assess the impact of these contexts upon literary form and content

-pursue interdisciplinary research into literature and culture from the period 1750-1900, including using primary materials from the library collections.

-assess changes in the perception of illness and the body throughout this period, and to discuss major developments in medical theory and practice at this time.

-compare and contrast texts from different historical periods, using techniques of close reading in conjunction with an awareness of broader theories and methodologies.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.