Critical Thinking and Communication DUMF5100

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 5 (SCQF level 11)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: No

Short Description

This course aims to develop students' knowledge of critical thinking and to consider its relationship to effective communication. Fundamentals of critical thinking such as argument identification, reconstruction and evaluation will underpin an exploration and analysis of critical thinking dispositions, principles of constructive dialogue and its relationship to persuasive communication.

Timetable

2 hours each week.

Requirements of Entry

Admission to a PGT course at the School of Interdisciplinary Studies

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

2 x short answer/multi-choice question paper (approx. weeks 4 and 9): 15% of overall assessment each

1 x Argument Reconstruction Exercise/exam: 20%

1 x essay (50%)

Course Aims

This course aims to develop students' knowledge of critical thinking and to consider its relationship to effective communication. Historical context (e.g. philosophy and education theory) and fundamentals of critical thinking such as argument identification, reconstruction and evaluation will underpin an exploration and analysis of critical thinking dispositions, principles of constructive dialogue and its relevance to persuasive communication. Emphasis is placed on the practical outcomes of becoming a better critical thinker and more effective communicator, but there is also significant consideration of theoretical issues concerning, e.g., what constitutes critical thinking dispositions; the ways in which and the extent to which such knowledge is generic and transferable, and its place in school curricula.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

 

1. Apply critical analysis to the theoretical and historical context of critical thinking in philosophy, education and applied communication.

2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the fundamentals of critical thinking: e.g. arguments, premises and conclusions, validity, fallacies, dialogues, argumentation, critical thinking dispositions.

3. Apply a range of specialised skills such as the practice of argument reconstruction and evaluation to a variety of different texts.

4. Demonstrate extensive, detailed and critical knowledge and understanding of some fundamentals of applied communication such as rhetoric, the psychology of persuasion, and criteria for constructive dialogues.

5. Critically review the nature and utility of the relationship between critical thinking and communication.

6. Critically evaluate a range of contemporary theoretical issues such as what constitutes critical thinking dispositions; the ways in which, and the extent to which, such knowledge is generic and transferable, and its place in school curricula.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.