A Cultural History Of Animals DUMF5034

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 5 (SCQF level 11)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

A graduate course designed to study the cultural history of animals and their complex relationship with humans. Students will have the opportunity to explore a wide range of topics which might include, but not be restricted to, the historical relationship between humans and animals; customs and rituals associated with animals; animals in mythology, fable, folktale and legend; animals and the supernatural; animals and traditional medicine, and cryptozoology.

Timetable

Students will normally meet for two hours every week.

Requirements of Entry

Entry to the Environment, Culture and Communication M.Litt.  The course is also open to non-graduating students, who can be admitted at the discretion of the convenor.

Assessment

Assignment: Comparative Essay 25% Due Week 6. Students will be expected to write approx. 2500-3000-word comparative analysis of the folklore and/or cultural history of one type of animal or species.

 Class Essay: Research Essay 50% Due Week 10. Students will be expected to write approx.5000 words. This essay should focus on the cultural and/or folkloric relationship between humans and animals.

Oral Presentation: Poster Presentation 25% Due Week 11. Students will produce a poster presentation on the folklore and/or cultural history of a chosen animal and will be expected to discuss and defend the poster verbally.

Course Aims

The principle aims of this course are:

- To introduce graduate students to the subject and to provide them with a secure grasp of the main issues it involves
- To offer the opportunity to study previously unfamiliar folkloristic and historical methodological approaches
- To familiarise students with a variety of primary, secondary and orally collected sources available for the study of the folklore of animals
- To build confidence and expertise in the handling and interpretation of primary and secondary material
- To foster student awareness of the distinctive problems of studying the folklore and cultural history of animals and the possible interpretation and solution thereof
The principle aims of this course are:

- To introduce graduate students to the subject and to provide them with a secure grasp of the main issues it involves
- To offer the opportunity to study previously unfamiliar folkloristic and historical methodological approaches
- To familiarise students with a variety of primary, secondary and orally collected sources available for the study of the folklore of animals
- To build confidence and expertise in the handling and interpretation of primary and secondary material
- To foster student awareness of the distinctive problems of studying the folklore and cultural history of animals and the possible interpretation and solution thereof

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

On completion of the course the student,

- Will have a knowledge and understanding of the best available, and most up-to-late literature on the topics covered
- Will be able to demonstrate an ability to articulate the main issues and debates, both written and orally
- Will be able to demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the range of methodologies available for the study of this subject
- Will demonstrate close familiarity with the major sources available for the study of this topic

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.

 

Students must attend at least 75% of all classes.