Literature 1 DUMF1045

  • Academic Session: 2018-19
  • School: School of Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 1 (SCQF level 7)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

The course introduces students to a range of texts within the three broad categories of poetry, drama, and the novel from the time of Shakespeare to the present. Close study of these texts will develop students' capacity to read deeply, identifying the key features and strategies of each literary genre, as well as enhancing their knowledge of the cultural and historical contexts surrounding the texts' production. The course focuses on the development of students' reading skills and the application of critical vocabulary in both written and verbal interaction.

Timetable

Two 1-hour lectures; plus one 2-hour seminar per week.

Requirements of Entry

Mandatory Entry Requirements

 

Recommended Entry Requirements

Assessment

Assessment

Seminar/Tutorial performance (10%); One essay (2000 words) (50%) and one examination (2 hours) (40%).

 

 

Reassessment

In accordance with the University's Code of Assessment reassessments are normally set for all courses which do not contribute to the honours classifications. For non honours courses, students are offered reassessment in all or any of the components of assessment if the satisfactory (threshold) grade for the overall course is not achieved at the first attempt. This is normally grade D3 for undergraduate students, and grade C3 for postgraduate students. Exceptionally it may not be possible to offer reassessment of some coursework items, in which case the mark achieved at the first attempt will be counted towards the final course grade. Any such exceptions are listed below in this box.

Main Assessment In: December

Course Aims

The course aims to:

1. Introduce students to a range of texts within the three broad categories of poetry, drama, and the novel.

2. Develop students' capacities to read, discuss, and present arguments concerning the texts studied.

3. Enhance students' general knowledge of the cultural and historical contexts of the texts' production.

4. Build students' confidence and authority as critical readers.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

1. Discuss a range of texts critically through drawing attention to a number of their principal characteristics such as use of metaphor, symbol, and the meaning(s) of certain notable terms.

2. Present a defensible interpretative argument about a text.

3. Articulate such arguments with reference to other perspectives or possible readings

4. Support their critical discussions and arguments with adequate evidence by means of citation and quotation.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment. Students must attend a minimum of 80% of all compulsory classes, including lectures and seminars.