Cultural Memory Studies and Medieval Irish Literature (Honours) CELTCIV4044

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Humanities
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 4 (SCQF level 10)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

The course offers an introduction to key concepts in cultural memory studies through a close engagement with pre-modern Irish culture (up to c. 1600) and hence combines the acquisition of subject knowledge with an applied approach to theoretical concepts used widely in Arts and Humanities studies. It discusses the role cultural memory plays in the formation of cultural identity from various perspectives and this will equip students with key transferrable skills in cultural studies, from textual analysis to a critical, independent engagement with concepts and ideas. All texts will be provided in English translation and no prior knowledge of Irish/Gaelic or of pre-modern Irish culture is required.

Timetable

1 x 1-hour weekly lecture over 10 weeks; 10 x 1-hour seminars over 10 weeks, as scheduled on MyCampus

Requirements of Entry

Available to all students fulfilling requirements for Honours entry into Celtic, and by arrangement to visiting students or students of other Honours programmes who qualify under the University's 25% regulation.

Excluded Courses

PGT Version - CELTCIV5031

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

Exam (90 minutes duration) - 50%

Essay (2,500 words) - 30%

Seminar Presentation (10 minutes) + write up 500 words - 15% each

Seminar participation (task on Moodle) - 5 %

Main Assessment In: April/May

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? Not applicable for Honours courses

Reassessments are normally available for all courses, except those which contribute to the Honours classification. For non-Honours courses, students are offered reassessment in all or any of the components of assessment if the satisfactory (threshold) grade for the overall course is not achieved at the first attempt. This is normally grade D3 for undergraduate students and grade C3 for postgraduate students. Exceptionally it may not be possible to offer reassessment of some coursework items, in which case the mark achieved at the first attempt will be counted towards the final course grade. Any such exceptions for this course are described below. 

Course Aims

This course aims to:

■ Develop intellectual and analytical skills trough a close engagement with individual sources (and their cultural contexts) and key theoretical concepts; link this to their existing knowledge/areas of expertise

■ Critically assess influential debates and interpretations in cultural memory studies and demonstrate their wider relevance for human culture: (identity (trans-)formations, sense of belonging etc.)

■ Equip students with an in-depth understanding of the role and importance of cultural memory in general and in medieval Irish culture in particular

■ Provide an opportunity to learn how to critically assess influential concepts in relation to specific sources, and vice versa, and how to communicate those assessments successfully

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

■ Independently apply key concepts in memory studies, their genesis, development and potential for understanding central human concepts such as identity and belonging

■ Evidence appropriate subject knowledge of medieval Irish culture 

■ Engage independently with established concepts from cultural memory studies and highlight the benefits of, and problems with, applying them to individual sources

■ Produce critical argumentation in written and oral form that synthesizes subject knowledge, theoretical considerations and an historically sensitive engagement with sources

■ Develop and hone transferrable skills necessary for research through oral presentation, writing of essays and guided critical analysis in the seminars

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.