Post-Soviet Russia: Renegotiating Global And Local Identities CEES5018

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 5 (SCQF level 11)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

In 1991 following the collapse of the Soviet Union a newly independent Russia emerged. The aim of the course is to explore the idea of Russia as a 'state', 'nation' and 'people' that is in the process of re-negotiating its contemporary identity at the global, national, regional, local and individual levels, but firmly locating this exploration within the context of Russia's past.

Timetable

Classes will be in the form of weekly 2-hour seminars in Semester 2.

Requirements of Entry

None

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

course essay of 4,000 - 5,000 words worth 90% of overall grade and student presentation worth 10% of overall grade

Course Aims

In 1991 following the collapse of the Soviet Union a newly independent Russia emerged. It was a Russia heavily influenced by its past, but situated within a contemporary context of growing global inter-dependency and exchange, regional de-colonisation and nation building, and internal economic, social political and cultural upheaval and crisis. The aim of the course is to explore the idea of Russia as a 'state', 'nation' and 'people' that is in the process of re-negotiating its contemporary identity at the global, national, regional, local and individual levels, but firmly locating this exploration within the context of Russia's past. The course examines internal and external themes and associated processes that are of particular relevance in the contemporary period; it explores their construction and experience at different spatial levels; and assesses the way in which they impact upon, and are in turn influenced by, the development, constitution and positioning of the Russian state, nation and its people.

The course adopts an approach that draws upon sociological and geographical literatures and combines utilisation of key theoretical conceptual frameworks (for example debates around globalisation/localisation, nationalism, ethnicity, post-colonialism) with analysis of more grounded empirical perspectives to explore the range of focal issues - issues that are of both central significance to present-day Russia and to our own societies, economies, polities and cultures.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

· demonstrate a thorough knowledge and understanding of the contemporary nature of the Russian state, nation and people at the different spatial levels of the global, national, regional, local and individual;
· assess the significance of the past to comprehending the development of contemporary Russian national identity at the macro/state and micro/societal levels;
· to identify the commonalities and differences with the West in Russia's experience of issues of contemporary global and local significance;
· explain the importance of place, and of temporal and spatial positioning, for understanding the operation and experience of contemporary Russian and wider global societies;
· assess criticaly and utilise key theoretical frameworks, conceptual models, empirical studies and primary data sources to deepen understanding of Russian contemporary development.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

  Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.