Human dimensions of conservation BIOL5292

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: Biodiversity Animal Health Comp Med
  • Credits: 10
  • Level: Level 5 (SCQF level 11)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: No

Short Description

The course explores human dimensions of conservation, including topics relating to biodiversity conservation and human development, sustainable use, wildlife trade, hunting, human-wildlife conflict and wildlife interventions. These subjects will be considered from diverse ethical, ecological, soco-economic and political perspectives.

Timetable

10 hours of lectures and 10 hours of supervised practical work, will be delivered over a one week block: which will include problem-based scenarios and 'media-style' presentations/discussions of assignment topics. Additional self-study hours will take place during the week of the course and subsequent weeks of the semester.

Requirements of Entry

None

Excluded Courses

None

Assessment

Students will prepare a short piece of written work that addresses a contemporary conservation dilemma in the form of a press statement. This will form the basis of a media-style interview or presentation. Students will be assessed on their ability to summarise, synthesize and communicate key messages in a way that is accessible to a lay audience (50%). The remaining 50% will be based on a written exercise that will require integration of the evidence-based knowledge and skills learned in this module.

Course Aims

The course explores human dimensions of conservation, including topics relating to biodiversity conservation and human development, sustainable use, wildlife trade, hunting, human-wildlife conflict and wildlife interventions. These subjects will be considered from diverse ethical, ecological, socio-economic and political perspectives.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

■ Critically discuss with reference to the evidence base and primary literature:

■ Different approaches to natural resource management and their implications for biodiversity conservation and human development.

■ Interacting ecological, ethical, social and economic issues affecting conservation and the management of wildlife.

■ Challenges surrounding the sustainable utilisation of wildlife, including tourism, sport hunting and wildlife trade.

■ Dilemmas arising from human-wildlife conflict and different approaches to conflict mitigation.

■ Attitudes and approaches towards different types of wildlife interventions for conservation.

■ Demonstrate a detailed understanding of a contemporary conservation dilemma.

■ Make a rational argument for/against a particular conservation action/approach.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.