Please note: there may be some adjustments to the teaching arrangements published in the course catalogue for 2020-21. Given current circumstances related to the Covid-19 pandemic it is anticipated that some usual arrangements for teaching on campus will be modified to ensure the safety and wellbeing of students and staff on campus; further adjustments may also be necessary, or beneficial, during the course of the academic year as national requirements relating to management of the pandemic are revised.

The Irish Revolution 1912-1925 ADED11971E

  • Academic Session: 2021-22
  • School: Short Courses
  • Credits: 5
  • Level: Level 1 (SCQF level 7)
  • Typically Offered: Summer
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: No

Short Description

The years 1912-25 saw the violent end of British rule in Ireland and its replacement by two new Irish states representing conflicting visions of the Irish future. This brief course will examine the causes, events and consequences of this revolutionary change in Ireland, from the first stirrings of revolt in Ulster in 1912, through the Easter Rising, to the political turmoil of violent insurrection, partition and civil war. Looking back a century later, this course will explore the legacies of this momentous decade and how they continue to shape modern Ireland today.

Timetable

Block 3

2 hours per week for 5 weeks (weeks 6-10)

Tuesday, 19.00-21.00

Requirements of Entry

None

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

Poster (600 words including graphics) using images and text to depict the cause of a key event of the Irish Revolution with reference to contemporary primary sources (75%)

 

Oral presentation by the student recorded as a short audio file (5 min) or submitted as a written commentary (500 words) comparing two historical perspectives to explain the consequences of this event (25%) 

Course Aims

This course aims to:

■ To provide students with a critical understanding of the key events, causes and consequences of the Irish revolution from the Ulster Crisis of 1912 to the final settlement of the Ulster boundary in 1925, including the development of nationalism and unionism, the breakdown of British authority in south and west Ireland and the establishment of partition.

■ To introduce students to a wide selection of relevant contemporary sources and conflicting historical interpretations.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

■ recognise and discuss the key events, major causes and consequences of the Irish revolution 1912-1925. 

■ Review and compare a selection of relevant contemporary sources and conflicting historical interpretations.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.