Scotland in the Middle Ages 1124 - 1371 ADED11473E

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: Short Courses
  • Credits: 10
  • Level: Level 1 (SCQF level 7)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: No

Short Description

The period from the accession of David I in 1124 to the death of David II in 1371 forged the modern nation of Scotland. This course will consider the extent to which David I's feudal and economic innovations shaped Scotland.

We will examine the influence of the Church on society and how religion was utilised to political advantage. The territorial expansion of Scotland will be assessed. We will also examine Anglo-Scottish relations during the period and consider the lives of William Wallace and Robert Bruce.

Timetable

Block 2 (10 meetings)

Mondays, 10.00-12.00

Requirements of Entry

None

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

The assessment will take the form of:

One essay of 1200-1500 words (75%)

A short analysis/commentary of a primary source of 800-1000 words (25%)

Course Aims

The course aims to:

■ Introduce students to the major themes in the social, religious, political economic and territorial development of Scotland between 1124 and 1371

■ Present some of the most important scholarly debates about this period.

■ Promote students' ability to identify and interpret primary and secondary sources

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

■ Identify and explain key developments in Scotland during the period including in the economy, landholding, the changing significance of the Church and territorial expansion

■ Evaluate and account for the break-down in relations with England that would, subsequently, feature so strongly in the later Middle Ages

■ Use and evaluate a range of source material including primary and secondary sources

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.