Topics in Psychology ADED11334

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: Short Courses
  • Credits: 0
  • Level: Level 1 (SCQF level 7)
  • Typically Offered: Summer
  • Available to Visiting Students: No
  • Available to Erasmus Students: No

Short Description

Psychologists have studied human behaviour for only about 150 years; this brief course will introduce students to how psychologists have approached five topics in human behaviour. Topics will include: Can watching violence make us violent? Is intelligence inherited or learned?  How can people collude in genocide?  How do children learn language? How reliable is eyewitness testimony?

Timetable

Block 4

Weeks 6-10

Tuesdays, 19.00-21.00 

 

Requirements of Entry

None

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

None

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? No

Reassessments are normally available for all courses, except those which contribute to the Honours classification. For non-Honours courses, students are offered reassessment in all or any of the components of assessment if the satisfactory (threshold) grade for the overall course is not achieved at the first attempt. This is normally grade D3 for undergraduate students and grade C3 for postgraduate students. Exceptionally it may not be possible to offer reassessment of some coursework items, in which case the mark achieved at the first attempt will be counted towards the final course grade. Any such exceptions for this course are described below. 

Course Aims

This course aims to support students to:

■ Be able to describe five popular topics in human behaviour from a psychological perspective

■ Use their knowledge of psychology to defend their own ideas

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

■ Describe the framework used to investigate five popular topics in psychology

■ Evaluate research paradigms used in psychology

■ Locate published materials relevant to each topic

■ Describe how psychological knowledge can be applied to real-world problems

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

N/A