Scotland 1567-1707 ADED11288E

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: Short Courses
  • Credits: 10
  • Level: Level 1 (SCQF level 7)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

Seventeenth century Scotland was particularly turbulent: an absentee monarch provoked a civil war that resulted in the establishment of a Covenanted theocracy, prompting invasion and incorporation into the republic of the English Commonwealth. The restoration of the Stuarts was followed by the accession of William of Orange and Jacobitism and culminated with parliamentary Union in 1707. We will discuss these and other main features of Scottish history during this period.

Timetable

Block 1

2 hours per week for 10 weeks

Thursdays

19.30-21.30

Requirements of Entry

None

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

One essay consisting of c.2,000 words, to be submitted by the end of the course. A selection of essay titles and bibliography will be provided at the beginning of the course.  

Course Aims

The course aims to:

■ Develop analytical skills and research skills;

■ Provide a broad introduction to the main features of Scottish history between the accession of James VI in 1567 and the parliamentary Union of 1707; 

■ Acquaint students with a wide variety of primary sources appropriate to the study of the field;

■ Make students aware of some the most important scholarly debates in the field.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

■ Identify and discuss issues pertaining to key developments in the governance of Scotland , including periods of civil unrest;

■ Compare and contrast the governance of Scotland under key leaders between 1567-1707;

■ Critically analyse the reasons for the Union of Parliaments in 1707;

■ Compare and contrast conflicting historical interpretations in relation to Scotland 1567-1707.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.