Postgraduate taught 

Economic Development MSc

Policies For Sustainability And Development (Food Security) ECON5103

  • Academic Session: 2020-21
  • School: Adam Smith Business School
  • Credits: 10
  • Level: Level 5 (SCQF level 11)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: No
  • Available to Erasmus Students: No

Short Description

This standalone course, aspires to familiarise students with the varying interpretations of 'development' and how these differ from 'economic growth'. It explores the differing approaches to 'greening' conventional national income; analyses the relative merits and problems of different policy approaches to the utilisation of key environmental resources; critically evaluates the key role of energy in the economic process and the potential roles of varying technologies particularly in the light of the 'Stern Report'; and explores issues of appropriate governance in seeking to achieve sustainable development or, more modestly and realistically, improving the ecological efficiency of economic activity. On successful completion of the course, students should be able to interpret and critically evaluate diverse data sources relating to the economic / environment interface; formulate realistic ecologically coherent objectives for development explicitly recognising environmental constraints; and assess the relative merits of different policy options for achieving the objectives outlined above.

Timetable

A 2-hour lecture each week for 10 weeks.

Requirements of Entry

Please refer to the current postgraduate prospectus at: http://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/

Excluded Courses

ECON5026

Assessment

Coursework: essay (100% of course assessment)

Course Aims

a) To familiarise students with the varying interpretations of 'development' and how these differ from 'economic growth'.

b) To explore the differing approaches to 'greening' conventional national income statistics.

c) To explore the relative merits and problems of different policy approaches to the utilisation of key environmental resources.

d) To critically evaluate the key role of energy in the economic process and the potential roles of varying energy technologies particularly in the light of the 'Stern Report'.

e) To explore issues of appropriate governance in seeking sustainable development.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

a) Interpret and evaluate critically diverse data sources relating to the economic/environment interface.

b) Formulate realistic ecologically coherent objectives for development explicitly recognising constraints.

c) Evaluate critically the relative merits of different policy options for achieving objectives as above with particular reference to the respective roles for national as opposed to international action.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.