English Language & English Linguistics MSc

English Language & English Linguistics

You will combine advanced study in historical and modern aspects of English language and English linguistics. This programme provides career opportunities in research, teaching, publishing and lexicography among others. It is a research training Masters in line with Arts & Humanities Research Council practice and is an accredited part of the training programme of the Economic & Social Research Council Scottish Doctoral Training Centre.

Key facts

Why this programme

  • You will have access to Glasgow’s Special Collections, which has a large collection of medieval and renaissance manuscripts and early printed books.
  • You will also have access to professional standard equipment for the analysis of speech data in the University’s Phonetics Lab.

Programme structure

You will learn through a combination of lectures, regular supervisions, formative essay writing and attendance at supplementary classes and seminars. Assessment includes a portfolio of essays.

You will undertake a number of core courses in historical and modern English language and English linguistics, including

  • Phonetics and phonology
  • Sociolinguistics
  • Lexicography, lexicology and semantics
  • Discourse analysis and grammar
  • English philology
  • Dialectology.

You can also take courses on offer in some MLitt programmes in the College of Arts, for example, Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Classics.

You will take courses in research skills and methods.

The second half of the programme is dedicated to your individual dissertation work, under the guidance of two assigned supervisors.

Core and optional courses

The components covered in Semester 1 provide a high level overview of core topics in English Language and English Linguistics. You will study current issues in these fields, which will provide the basis for independent empirical research in your chosen specified areas in Semester 2.

Phonetics and Phonology
In this component you will gain an overview articulatory phonetics, practical phonetics, acoustic phonetics, speech perception, clinical phonetics and phonological theories. Emphasis throughout the course is on the practical application of phonetics and phonetic theory to the analysis of speech data, and in particular, on accents of English/languages of the UK, with specific attention to the accent(s)/languages which they intend to study further.

Sociolinguistics
In this component you will explore the interface between language and society and how these drive linguistic variation and change. We will discuss influences on speech such as age, geography and the media, as well as the language system itself. By examining empirical analyses of natural speech data conducted by key researchers in the field, you will learn core concepts associated with this field of study. By the end of the course you will be able to say what people are doing when they speak, and why.

Discourse Studies
This component focuses on written texts, examining models of discourse which provide practical insights into the structure and cognitive processing of these texts. You will study a number of approaches and will look critically at the models suggested by well-known text linguists, stylisticians and (critical) discourse analysts. Teaching on this module includes work on discourse structures, stylistic analysis, cognitive processing of texts, narrative and non-narrative texts, socio-political analysis of texts

English Historical Linguistics
This component aims to give students a thorough grounding in English historical linguistics, appropriate for further study at postgraduate level. Discussion focuses on the principles of language change with reference to all levels of language (grammar, lexicon and transmission), on issues of evidence, on new resources (such as the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary) and on the historiography of English historical linguistics.  Students also study the language of specified texts from a variety of periods in the history of the English.

Medieval English Studies
This component offers students the chance to engage critically with the evidence for the English language from the medieval period.  Discussion focuses on the ways in which texts from these periods reflect cultural and historical developments, i.e. how textual form reflects social function.  Elements include a survey of current issues in book history relevant to the period, of the history of verse and prose styles, and of the interface between philological and literary study.  The afterlives of medieval English texts in later centuries are also discussed.  Students also undertake close study of a selection of key literary texts from the Old and Middle English periods.

Onomastics
This component invites students to engage critically with current issues in name-studies.  Topics covered include the origins and development of names of places and of people in England and Scotland, to investigate the special properties of names as lexical items, and to examine the function of names in contemporary discourse and literature.  The course focuses in particular on the contribution onomastics can make to historical, demographic, literary and linguistic studies.

Dialectology
This component offers students an introduction to historical and modern dialectology, with special reference to English and Scots.  A short history of dialectological studies is offered, including an introduction to the Linguistic Atlases of Late Mediaeval English (and associated projects), and to the major modern surveys: Wright’s Grammar and Dictionary from the late nineteenth century, and twentieth-century surveys such as the Survey of English Dialects, the Linguistic Survey of Scotland, and various surveys of English in North America.  Students are introduced to current issues in dialectology, including its relationship to modern linguistic theories of variation and change, and undertake close study of a selection of written and spoken (transcribed) texts.

Dissertation

From April to September, students work on a short dissertation (15,000 words) linking directly to work undertaken in Semester 2 with their supervisors. The Dissertation can be an end in itself, but it is envisaged that it can also act as a pilot-study for, or a component part of, a subsequent doctoral thesis.

 

Entry requirements

for entry in 2015

We normally expect applicants to have obtained a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification (for example, GPA 3.0 or above).

Please include a 200-word statement on why you wish to take the MSc in English Language and Linguistics; a sample of your own written work (approx. 2,000 words). This can be from a previous degree you have completed. You are required to submit material that is entirely your own original work, except where clearly indicated. We also require at least one academic reference.

Further information regarding academic entry requirements: student.recruitment@glasgow.ac.uk

English language requirements

For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level.

International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training):

  • overall score 7.0
  • no sub-test less than 7.0
  • or equivalent scores in another recognised qualification (see below)

Common equivalent English language qualifications

All stated English tests are acceptable for admission for both home/EU and international students for this programme:

  • ibTOEFL: 92; no sub-test less than 22 with Speaking no less than 23
  • CAE (Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English): 185; no sub-test less than 185
  • CPE (Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English): 185; no sub-test less than 185
  • PTE Academic (Person Test of English, Academic test): 68; minimum 60 in writing

For international students, the Home Office has confirmed that the University can choose to use these tests to make its own assessment of English language ability for visa applications to degree level programmes. The University is also able to accept an IELTS test (Academic module) from any of the 1000 IELTS test centres from around the world and we do not require a specific UKVI IELTS test for degree level programmes. We therefore still accept any of the English tests listed for admission to this programme.

Pre-sessional courses
The University of Glasgow accepts evidence of the required language level from the Language Centre Pre-sessional courses. We also consider other BALEAP accredited pre-sessional courses:

FAQs

What do I do if...

my language qualifications are below the requirements?

The University's Language Centre offers a range of Pre-Sessional Courses to bring you up to entry level. The course is accredited by BALEAP, the UK professional association for academic English teaching; see Links.

my language qualifications are not listed here?

Please contact the Recruitment and International Office: pgadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk

 

For further information about English language requirements, please contact the Recruitment and International Office: pgadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk

Fees and funding

Tuition fees for 2015-16 (subject to change and for guidance only)

MSc

Home and EU
Full time fee£6800
Part time 20 credits£756
International
Full time fee£14500

Funding opportunities

Career prospects

Career opportunities include teaching, publishing, digital analysis, journalism and lexicography. You can take advantage of opportunities to establish or advance your career as a writer or editor, or to work in museums, schools or academia. Other graduates have used their specialist knowledge to gain positions in the media or in business.

How to apply

We ask that you apply online for a postgraduate taught degree. Our system allows you to fill out the standard application form online and submit this to the University within 42 days of starting your application.

You need to read the guide to applying online before starting your application. It will ensure you are ready to proceed, as well as answer many common questions about the process.

Guide to applying online

Do I have to apply online for a postgraduate taught degree?

Yes. To apply for a postgraduate taught degree you must apply online. We are unable to accept your application by any other means than online.

Do I need to complete and submit the application in a single session?

No. You have 42 days to submit your application once you begin the process. You may save and return to your application as many times as you wish to update information, complete sections or upload additional documents such as your final transcript or your language test.

What documents do I need to provide to make an application?

As well as completing your online application fully, it is essential that you submit the following documents:

  • A copy (or copies) of your official degree certificate(s) (if you have already completed your degree)
  • A copy (or copies) of your official academic transcript(s), showing full details of subjects studied and grades/marks obtained
  • Official English translations of the certificate(s) and transcript(s)
  • Two supporting reference letters on headed paper
  • Evidence of your English Language ability (if your first language is not English)
  • Any additional documents required for this programme (see Entry requirements for this programme)
  • A copy of the photo page of your passport (Non-EU students only)

If you do not have all of these documents at the time of submitting your application then it is still possible to make an application and provide any further documents at a later date, as long as you include a full current transcript (and an English translation if required) with your application. See the ‘Your References, Transcripts and English Qualification’ sections of our Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

Do my supporting documents need to be submitted online?

Yes, where possible, please upload the supporting documents with your application.

How do I provide my references?

You must either upload the required references to your online application or ask your referees to send the references to the University as we do not contact referees directly. There is two main ways that you can provide references: you can either upload references on headed paper when you are making an application using the Online Application (or through Applicant Self-Service after you have submitted your application) or you can ask your referee to email the reference directly to pgadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk. See the 'Your References, Transcripts and English Qualifications' section of the Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

What if I am unable to submit all of my supporting documents online?

If you cannot upload an electronic copy of a document and need to send it in by post, please attach a cover sheet to it that includes your name, the programme you are applying for, and your application reference number.

You may send them to:

Recruitment & International Office
71 Southpark Avenue
Glasgow
G12 8QQ
Fax: +44 141 330 4045

Can I email my supporting documents?

No. We cannot accept email submissions of your supporting documents.

What entry requirements should I have met before applying? Where can I find them?

You should check that you have met (or are likely to have met prior to the start of the programme) the individual entry requirements for the degree programme you are applying for. This information can be found on the ‘entry requirements’ tab on each individual programme page, such as the one you are viewing now.

What English Language requirements should I have met before applying? Where can I find them?

If you are an international student, you should also check that you have met the English Language requirements specific to the programme you are applying for. These can also be found on the ‘entry requirements’ tab for each specific programme.

Further Information

Please see the Frequently Asked Questions for more information on applying to a postgraduate taught programme.

Guidance notes for using the online application

These notes are intended to help you complete the online application form accurately, they are also available within the help section of the online application form. If you experience any difficulties accessing the online application then you should visit the Application Troubleshooting/FAQs page.

  • Name and Date of birth: must appear exactly as they do on your passport. Please take time to check the spelling and lay-out.
  • Contact Details: Correspondence address. All contact relevant to your application will be sent to this address including the offer letter(s). If your address changes, please contact us as soon as possible.
  • Choice of course: Please select carefully the course you want to study. As your application will be sent to the admissions committee for each course you select it is important to consider at this stage why you are interested in the course and that it is reflected in your application.
  • Proposed date of entry: Please state your preferred start date including the month and the year. Taught masters degrees tend to begin in September. Research degrees may start in any month.
  • Education and Qualifications: Please complete this section as fully as possible indicating any relevant Higher Education qualifications starting with the most recent. Complete the name of the Institution (s) as it appears on the degree certificate or transcript.
  • English Language Proficiency: Please state the date of any English language test taken (or to be taken) and the award date (or expected award date if known).
  • Employment and Experience: Please complete this section as fully as possible with all employments relevant to your course. Additional details may be attached in your personal statement/proposal where appropriate.
  • References: Please provide the names and contact details of two academic references. Where applicable one of these references may be from your current employer. References should be completed on letter headed paper and uploaded on to your application.

Standard application deadlines

  • International applications (non-EU) 24 July 2015
  • UK and EU applications 28 August 2015
    (with the exception of those programmes offering SFC funded places)

Classes start September 2015 for most programmes and you may be expected to attend induction sessions the week before.

Apply now