Postgraduate research opportunities 

Modern Languages & Cultures

We have expertise and supervision in language, culture, literature and history for the subjects of French, German, Hispanic, Italian and Slavonic. Alongside a strong postgraduate community in Comparative Literature and Translation Studies.

Overview

French

French at Glasgow is part of a thriving School of Modern Languages and Cultures, with a lively research environment and postgraduate community.  Staff produce world-leading research both within specialist fields of French and Francophone Studies, through transcultural, comparative work with colleagues from other languages across the School, and in more wide-ranging interdisciplinary collaborations across the College of Arts (English Literature, History, History of Art, Film, Digital Humanities, Philosophy, Theology) and College of Social Sciences (Politics, Education, Sociology, Economic History).

Many of the research staff in French at Glasgow hold key roles in subject associations, national and international networks, and are involved as editors or editorial board members with some of the leading journals in the field, such as French Cultural Studies, Paragraph or European Comic Art.

We would welcome proposals from any area of French studies, but particular research strengths include:

  • Contemporary French History and Society
  • Francophone African and Caribbean Literature and Visual Culture
  • Medieval Literature and Culture, and its relations to present day culture
  • Text/Image Studies, particularly Emblems and Bandes dessinées
  • Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Culture including Poetry
  • Philosophical and theoretical approaches to literature and film
  • Gender Studies
  • Translation (Practice and Theory)

German

Staff research interests :

  • Aesthetics and the history of ideas
  • Classicism and Romanticism
  • Feminism and Gender Studies
  • German cultural theory
  • German for business and commercial purposes 
  • German political and economic thought
  • Medical Humanities
  • Literature and Culture of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries
  • Psychoanalytical theory
  • Realism

Programme Director for German Dr Sheila Dicksonsheila.dickson@glasgow.ac.uk 

Hispanic Studies

Postgraduate students have the opportunity to participate in a wide range of activities through the Graduate School of Arts and Humanities and will join the diverse and lively postgraduate community within the School of Modern Languages and Cultures. Many of our postgraduate students in the past have come from Chile, Europe, USA, Brazil, and Mexico and we warmly welcome applications from international students.

Our main focus is 19th, 20th and 21st Century Latin American and Peninsular Culture, Film, Literature and Cultural Theory (with special interest in Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Portugal and Spain (including Catalonia)).

Staff research interests:

  • Latin American visual culture, including the cinema, art and photography of Brazil, Mexico and the Southern Cone.
  • Latin American poetry and narrative.
  • Brazilian culture, society and national identity.
  • 19th, 20th and 21st century Peninsular literature, cinema, cultural history and cultural studies.
  • 20th and 21st century Catalan Studies, including literature, cultural studies, sociolinguistics and questions of nationalism/national identity.

Examples of topics we can supervise include:

  • Regional/National Identities in Spain
  • Modern and Contemporary Literature in Catalan and Spanish
  • Hispanic Multilingual Literature
  • Censorship during Franco’s Regime
  • Women Writers in Spain
  • the Nineteenth Century Spanish Press
  • Hispanic Women Artists
  • Contemporary Argentine Cinema
  • Gender and the Historic Avant-Garde
  • (Auto)biographical/Testimonial Literature in Latin America
  • Photographic Narrative in Mexico
  • Brazilian History, Culture and Society
  • Political Cinema and Documentary
  • Latin American Poetry.

Programme Director: Dr Jordi Cornella Detrell  Jordi.Cornella@glasgow.ac.uk

Italian

Staff research interests:

  • Modern Italian literature and culture
  • Women and 20th-century Italy (history, fiction and journalism)
  • History and literature of the Italian Resistance to Fascism
  • Modern Italian Poetry (especially Eugenio Montale and Edoardo Sanguineti)
  • The Italian Neo-Avant-garde
  • Emotions and the History of Modern Italy
  • Literature and Cultural Identity of Trieste
  • Modern Italian Theatre

Slavonic Studies 

We have one of the richest resources in the western world for Slavonic Studies, that include:

  • a major collection of contemporary and classic Central East European cinema
  • some 80000 volumes from the Slavonic and Eastern European area
  • a Special Collection that includes early translations of the Bible into Czech, Polish and Russian
  • a unique set of Trotsky items, make it one of the .

Members of staff co-edit two of the leading journals in the field, Slavonica and Avtobiografiia, and hold key roles in international and national research and subject-area networks.

We would welcome proposals from any area of Slavonic Studies, but particular research strengths include:

  • Czech and Polish media
  • Censorship in communist and post-communist Central Europe
  • Czech cinema since 1989
  • Polish drama ‘written outside the nation’
  • Memory studies (particularly Polish/Jewish relations)
  • Gulag literature and writing
  • Samizdat
  • Auto/biographical studies
  • Post-1945 Czech identity and travel writing
  • The theatre of Chekhov in Spain
  • Russo-Hispanic cultural and literary relations

Research Convenor:Dr John Bates Email: John.Bates@glasgow.ac.uk

Comparative Literature

Comparative Literature has close collaborative links, not only with disciplines such as Translations Studies, English Literature, Scottish Literature and Classics, but also with History, Art History, Philosophy, Gender History, as well as Central and East European Studies and Economic and Social History, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Medical Humanities, and Digital Humanities.  We are also involved within larger networks such as Human Rights Network and GRAMnet (Glasgow Refugee, Asylum and Migration network).

This allows us to offer a very wide variety of research pathways for students with diverse backgrounds and interests.  Our special strengths linguistically include languages of:

  • Eastern, Central, and Western Europe
  • Latin America as well
  • and Mandarin.

The work that we do addresses the problems of understanding an ‘Other’ across times, places/spaces, and cultures, whether this work is undertaken by means of translation, literary/cultural or social analysis, or historical research. 

Our research students organise a regular seminar series and play an active role in building a thriving research environment beneficial to all postgraduate students within modern languages and cultures.

Our Comparative Literature Programme might be subtitled: European and European Influenced. There is indeed still much work to be done in having East meet West since the fall of the Wall so many years ago, and we are proudly placed, with our Slavonic subject areas, to enable research and teaching in this cross-over area. We cross into the New World as well, having staff working on, for example, Quebecois literature, Mexican and Brazilian, as well as North American Anglophone literature.

Translation Studies

Translation Studies research ranges from literary through to audiovisual translation across a broad range of languages.  Research proposals are particularly welcome in the following areas of Translation Studies:

  • Translation Studies theory and history
  • methodologies for translation
  • bridging the gap between translation theory and practice
  • literary translation, including poetry
  • translation as adaptation
  • translating non-standard language
  • translating gendered language
  • orality and translation
  • postcolonial translation
  • Africa and translation
  • Translation and censorship

Students work within a well established international research environment which supports a wide range of activities including a specialist Translation Studies research seminar series, the Glasgow University Translation Studies Research Network comprising a very active postgraduate wing, a quarterly Translation Studies newsletter plus social media managed by our postgraduate students:

Study options

PhD

Duration: 3 years full-time / 5 years part-time

A Doctor of Philosophy may be awarded to a student whose thesis is an original work making a significant contribution to knowledge in, or understanding of, a field of study and normally containing material worthy of publication.

Thesis Length:70,000-100,000 words, including references, bibliography and appendices (other than documentary appendices).

MLitt (Research)

Duration: 2 years full-time / 3 years part-time

Our Degree of Master of Letters (Research) requires you to undertake a postgraduate course of special study and research that represents a distinct contribution to knowledge.

Thesis length: 40,000-70,000 words (including references, bibliography and appendices)

MPhil (Research)

Duration: 1 year full-time / 2years part-time

A Master of Philosophy (Research)requires you to undertake a postgraduate course of special study and research that represents a distinct contribution to knowledge.

Thesis length: 30,000-40,000 words (including references and bibliography)

MRes (Master of Research)

Duration: 1 year full-time / 2 years part-time

Our MRes includes both taught and research elements.  You will be required to undertake 60 to 90 credits worth of taught courses as well as independent study which represents some contribution to knowledge.

Thesis length: 18,000-30,000 words (including references, bibliography and appendices)

Supervisors

All Postgraduate Research Students are allocated a supervisor who will act as the main source of academic support and research mentoring.You may want to identify a potential supervisor and contact them to discuss your research proposal before you apply.

Entry requirements

Our regular standard of admission is at least an Upper Second Class Honours degree (2:1), although candidates will usually also have completed or be undertaking a Masters qualification.

Research proposal

Candidates are required to provide a single page outline of the research subject proposed (approximately 1000 words). This need not be a final thesis proposal but should include:

  • a straightforward, descriptive, and informative title
  • the question that your research will address
  • an account of why this question is important and worth investigating
  • an assessment of how your own research will engage with recent study in the subject
  • a brief account of the methodology and approach you will take
  • a discussion of the primary sources that your research will draw upon, including printed books, manuscripts, archives, libraries, or museums
  • an indicative bibliography of secondary sources that you have already consulted and/or are planning to consult

Your application, including your references and research proposal, will be passed to members of staff whose expertise and research interests most closely match the area of your proposed study.

English Language requirements for applicants whose first language is not English.

Fees and funding

Fees

2016/17

  • £4,121 UK/EU
  • £15,250 outside EU

Prices are based on the annual fee for full-time study. Fees for part-time study are half the full-time fee.

Additional fees for all students:

  • Submission by a research student £440
  • Submission for a higher degree by published work £890
  • Submission of thesis after deadline lapsed £140
  • Submission by staff in receipt of staff scholarship £680
  • Research students registered as non-supervised Thesis Pending students (50% refund will be granted if the student completes thesis within the first six months of the period) £250
  • General Council fee £50
  • Depending on the nature of the research project, some students will be expected to pay a bench fee to cover additional costs. The exact amount will be provided in the offer letter.

2017/18

  • £4,195 UK/EU*
  • £16,000 outside EU

Prices are based on the annual fee for full-time study. Fees for part-time study are half the full-time fee.

* We expect that tuition fees for EU students entering in 2017 will continue to be set at the same level as that for UK students.  However, future funding arrangements for EU students will be determined as part of the UK’s discussions on its future relationship.  If you are thinking of applying for 2017 entry, we would encourage you to do so in the usual way. For further information, please see the Research Councils UK statement on international collaboration and Universities UK Brexit FAQs for universities and students.

Additional fees for all students:

  • Submission by a research student £460
  • Submission for a higher degree by published work £1,000
  • Submission of thesis after deadline lapsed £200
  • Submission by staff in receipt of staff scholarship £680
  • Research students registered as non-supervised Thesis Pending students (50% refund will be granted if the student completes thesis within the first six months of the period) £260
  • General Council fee £50
  • Depending on the nature of the research project, some students will be expected to pay a bench fee to cover additional costs. The exact amount will be provided in the offer letter.

Funding

AHRC Doctoral Training Programme Scotland 2017/18

Funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) to support postgraduate studentships and training in the Arts and Humanities in Scotland.

College of Arts PhD scholarship competition 2017/18

We offer a number of scholarships for students undertaking a doctoral programme in the College of Arts Graduate School. These scholarships will include around four hours per week of internship duties.

Support

Our College of Arts Graduate School creates a productive and interdisciplinary collegiate environment for all of our research students. We offer a range of services, courses and skills development opportunities for research students.

The College of Arts is home to a vibrant and diverse community of students enrolled on taught masters and research programmes within a stimulating intellectual and cultural environment. Across every school and subject area the college is home to world-leading and agenda-setting research.

Find out more about what is happening in the community by following us: 

You will also be part of the wider Scottish Graduate School for Arts and Humanities, the world's first national graduate school in the Arts & Humanities. Membership includes 16 Scottish universities, four art schools & the national conservatoire, with support from the arts, culture, creative & heritage sectors.