Smiling student outside Fraser Building

Management is an interdisciplinary field of study drawing on a range of social science subjects including sociology, anthropology, education, political science, economics and social psychology

Overview

Management embraces diverse social science methodological traditions and research methods. Its interdisciplinarity and methodological pluralism position it well to address key contemporary concerns in the area of global economic performance, and new technology, innovation and skills.

The doctoral community in Business and Management requires both core social science research training and pathway-specific support to develop their skill base. The first year training is provided through taught elements.

As a research student you may have the opportunity to become a Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA), delivering tutorials to first and second year undergraduate students and helping with assessment of undergraduate assignments and examinations. Teaching is payable at a University-wide hourly rate and it is anticipated that an active GTA, subject to suitability and availability, should be able to earn up to £1,500 per annum. GTAs undergo compulsory training. Students who are interested in becoming GTAs should apply to the Head of Subject on commencing their PhD studies.

Full-time students are allocated office space and are provided with their own PC and printing facilities.

Contacts

Study options

Our PhD in Management is a full-time research-based programme. It normally takes a minimum of 3 years with a maximum time limit of 4 years. It can also be undertaken on a part-time basis [minimum 5 , maximum 8 years].

As a Management PhD student, you will have opportunities to:

  • benefit from the College of Social Sciences Graduate School Research Training programme
  • present and discuss your work in progress with colleagues and staff members in the annual Thesis Review Committees
  • attend  the annual Doctoral Retreats with expert speakers and workshops offering subject based skills training
  • attend Management research seminars

Assessment

Formal review procedures by the thesis committee have been introduced for all full-time and part-time doctoral researchers from the end of the first six months, to completion of the thesis. The purposes of the review process are: to provide researchers with the opportunity and forum in which to present material for discussion, to receive advice in setting achievable goals, feedback on their work, and suggestions for alternative approaches or directions.

As part of this procedure supervisors and students are required to complete a Progress Report in April/May of each academic year. All Progress Reports are reviewed by the PhD Convenor and by the Associate Dean of the College's Graduate School. A satisfactory progress report is a prerequisite for student registration in the following academic session.

Final assessment involves the submission of a thesis of between 70,000 and 100,000 words and an oral examination (viva voce).

Supervisors

All our postgraduate research students are allocated a supervisor who acts as the main source of academic support and research mentoring.

You may want to identify a potential supervisor and contact them to discuss your research proposal before you apply.

You may wish to contact a member of staff by email. Please ensure you only make contact with staff where there is a strong and clear match between their interests and your proposed research. Your email must include a detailed CV, a 3,000 word (maximum) research proposal and copies of your degree transcripts.

Entry requirements

As an applicant for one of our research degrees, you should normally possess a good Master’s degree (or overseas equivalent), with a significant component in Business or Management.

Required documentation

Applicants should submit:

  • Transcripts/degree certificate 
  • Two references
  • A research proposal (3000 words maximum)
  • CV
  • Name of potential Supervisor

Guide to writing a research proposal

A PhD is expected to make a significant and original contribution to knowledge. Therefore you need to explain how your research is likely to be original and how it will contribute to your field of study.  Your proposal must be convincing and be able to exist as a stand alone document.

A research proposal would normally be around 3,000 words and should be fully referenced throughout using Harvard Referencing Style. It should be clear and concise regarding the core focus and contribution of your research. Your proposal should include:

Working title

Research context and importance of the proposed research

This section should provide the background which outlines what your proposed research is about and what it is you are seeking to discover/achieve. It should be a brief introduction outlining the general area of study and identifying the subject area within which your study falls. You should also refer to the current state of knowledge (i.e. what research has been done to date) and any recent debates on the subject. This section should:

  • Demonstrate how your research ‘fills a gap’ in existing research (i.e. show that it hasn’t been done before). 
  • (Explain why your research is important – it is not enough to say that this has not been studied previously, you need to explain why it should be studied i.e. why it is interesting/important. 

Research aims

Against the background provided above you need to set out the contribution that your research will make in the form of specific aims, research questions or hypotheses.

Research methodology

Here you need to explain how you will obtain the information necessary to write your thesis.

Timetable

You should provide a very approximate timetable for the research.

English Language requirements for applicants whose first language is not English.

Fees and funding

Fees

2016/17

  • £4,121 UK/EU
  • £15,250 outside EU

Prices are based on the annual fee for full-time study. Fees for part-time study are half the full-time fee.

Additional fees for all students:

  • Submission by a research student £440
  • Submission for a higher degree by published work £890
  • Submission of thesis after deadline lapsed £140
  • Submission by staff in receipt of staff scholarship £680
  • Research students registered as non-supervised Thesis Pending students (50% refund will be granted if the student completes thesis within the first six months of the period) £250
  • General Council fee £50
  • Depending on the nature of the research project, some students will be expected to pay a bench fee to cover additional costs. The exact amount will be provided in the offer letter.

2017/18

  • £4,195 UK/EU*
  • £16,000 outside EU

Prices are based on the annual fee for full-time study. Fees for part-time study are half the full-time fee.

* We expect that tuition fees for EU students entering in 2017 will continue to be set at the same level as that for UK students.  However, future funding arrangements for EU students will be determined as part of the UK’s discussions on its future relationship.  If you are thinking of applying for 2017 entry, we would encourage you to do so in the usual way. For further information, please see the Research Councils UK statement on international collaboration and Universities UK Brexit FAQs for universities and students.

Additional fees for all students:

  • Submission by a research student £460
  • Submission for a higher degree by published work £1,000
  • Submission of thesis after deadline lapsed £200
  • Submission by staff in receipt of staff scholarship £680
  • Research students registered as non-supervised Thesis Pending students (50% refund will be granted if the student completes thesis within the first six months of the period) £260
  • General Council fee £50
  • Depending on the nature of the research project, some students will be expected to pay a bench fee to cover additional costs. The exact amount will be provided in the offer letter.

Alumni discount

A 10% discount is available to University of Glasgow alumni. This includes graduates and those who have completed a Junior Year Abroad, Exchange programme or International Summer School at the University of Glasgow. The discount is applied at registration for students who are not in receipt of another discount or scholarship funded by the University. No additional application is required.

Funding

Support

The Adam Smith Business School provides financial support for PhD students to attend international academic conferences to present their co-authored research.

eSharp is an international online journal for postgraduate research in the arts, humanities, social sciences and education. It is run entirely by graduate students and aims to provide a critical but supportive entry into the realm of academic publishing for emerging academics.

The School hosts a number of research events including seminars, workshops and conferences, all of which are open to staff and research students. 

Training opportunities

  • Information technology services - core computer skills and also specialist training, such as Finding and Using Library Special Collections Material and use of quantitative data analysis software.
  • Staff development service - Personal effectiveness, working with people, business skills.
  • English language unit - English and study skills.
  • Learning and teaching centre - compulsory training for Graduate Teaching Assistants and also a more in-depth training course, 'Approaches to Teaching, Learning and Assessment', useful for students considering an academic career.
  • Researcher development - personal development planning, effective research skills, business skills.
  • Research skills and professional development - a single website for research students to find out about college-based and university-wide training initiatives, resources and courses which develop their generic research and employability skills, and support their professional development.
  • Careers service - one-to-one guidance interviews, careers workshops, practice job interviews with recruitment experts, networking opportunities with a variety of potential employers.
  • Student employability - access to a range of resources designed to help students get the most out of their University careers and to give them the best possible head-start when they enter (or re-enter) the job market.

The College of Social Sciences Graduate School draws together internationally recognised scholars and respected practitioners to offer a range of research programmes.

Our programmes are based on thorough training in research methods and we encourage you to take part in numerous exciting seminars, conferences and events. We offer modern library, IT services and a wide-range of support services. You will be living in one of Europe’s most exciting cities which has a vibrant cultural and social life

Our Graduate School Researcher Development Programme will support you to plan your professional development over the course of your PhD and ensure your employability.

For more information get in touch with us at socsci-gradschool@glasgow.ac.uk.