Leverhulme collections 1

The Leverhulme Trust: "Collections" Scholarships

The Leverhulme Trust: "Collections" Scholarships

Collections: an Enlightenment Pedagogy for the 21st Century

It is well known that in the three hundred years since the Enlightenment, knowledge worldwide has made giant steps – but that at the same time, this knowledge has become compartmentalised. Increasingly narrow specialisms deliver insight and technological advances - at a price. Knowledge reflects depth, but rarely, a breadth of understanding. All too easily, the various disciplines of the modern academy lose touch with each other, when there remains much that they might share. Clinicians, scientists, historians, criminologists, curators and literary scholars, should and could share knowledge, insight and methodology. The need for a holistic vision for the academy is all the more pressing now, as researchers confront an environment where advances in digitization and an accelerating global connectivity has further increased the complexity and sheer number of accessible collections, whether these are artefacts, data or other kinds of ‘collected’ material. In this context, what for example, might a clinician learn from a criminologist or an art historian about the ethics of provenance and questions of consent? Or how best do we use network theory in relation to collections of literary novels? By drawing on the extensive resources of the University of Glasgow, the City of Glasgow and established national and international networks, Collections presents a re-imagining of the Enlightenment ambition. Working in close collaboration with one another, the Collections students will explore historical and contemporary collections using quantitative and qualitative techniques derived from Science, the Arts and Humanities; methodologies emerging from Big Data; and analysis from within medical disciplines.

In session 2017-18 there will be 5 PhD projects, each attracting a doctoral scholarship providing maintenance (c. £14,500 in session 2017-18) and fees (Home/EU rate only) at Research Council rates :

Collecting Worlds, Learning Geography:

Disciplinary History and Knowledge Production in the Undergraduate Geography Dissertation

What should a learning geographer know, and how might it be possible to keep telling “small stories” of geographical knowledge production from the bottom-up? This PhD studentship is an opportunity to think critically about the modern intellectual and pedagogic history of geography through two traditional elements of undergraduate degree studies: the fieldwork-based dissertation and the examination paper.

Context
The geography dissertation is regarded by academic lecturing staff as a conclusive or defining test of independent ability, undertaken in the concluding phases of undergraduate degree studies. As a defining statement, the dissertation is also reflective of wider student learning, encompassing cultures of fieldwork activity, data gathering, processing and interpreting, and presentational design. Evidently, every student’s geography dissertation has a singular story to tell, and is representative of the undergraduate voice in university geography. Cumulatively, dissertations also speak to greater questions of disciplinary trends, character, range and change, and the ways in which diverse worlds, peoples and places, have been collected and documented by learning geographical researchers.

The examination paper has, for over a century, been accepted as a standard form of assessment in university geography degree studies. The design of examination papers and the formulation of specific questions reflect academic expectations about student abilities of knowledge acquisition and written expression. Changing styles of exam paper and question can also be reflective of trends and tastes in the discipline, either locally or as a greater scholarly community. In spite of its significance and centrality as a means of testing ability and classifying student performance, the examination paper remains all but unexamined in scholarship on the history of geographical education in higher education.

Approach
Based on an archival-interpretive approach, studentship activities will centre on a large, unified collection of undergraduate geography dissertations and degree examination papers held by the School of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow. The School retains a near-complete run of hard copy dissertations (regional; physical; human) submitted by final-year undergraduate Geography students, c. 1959-2016. Once chaotic and only semi-catalogued, Glasgow’s dissertation collection has been recently re-housed and newly organised with a searchable database, making properly accessible a unique archival resource spanning almost sixty years of intellectual and pedagogic change in academic Geography through the praxis of undergraduate students. Similarly, the School holds a significant archived collection of the question papers sat by student classes in examination diets at University of Glasgow c. 1913-1980. (Additional, supplementary archival holdings collected by the School include: student expedition photograph albums; student fieldwork reports; Drumlin, the annual student magazine).

Framed by scholarship in historical geography, the history of geography and geographical education, the project can variously address questions of knowledge production, spaces and scales of learning, scholastic conventions, local traditions, trust and credibility, cultural representation, cartographic literacy, and disciplinary integration and fragmentation. Ultimately, the studentship seeks to understand how the exercise of learning to become a geographer at University of Glasgow has, variously over time, reflected or resisted canonical disciplinary narratives.

Applicants
Applications are welcome from students with interests in, variously: the history of geography; historical-cultural geography; histories of geographical education; histories of higher education. Applicants must have an undergraduate degree in Geography (2:1 or better), and a Masters degree in Geography, or a cognate subject area in the social sciences, or arts and humanities. Applications will be considered from individuals holding an undergraduate degree in Geography (2:1 or better), and a professional career history in geographical education likely to compensate for research training at Masters level.

This project belongs to the Conceptual thematic cluster. The successful candidate will be supervised by Prof Hayden Lorimer and Prof Christopher Philo (Geographical and Earth Sciences).

Candidates interested in applying for funded PhD study on this project are encouraged to make informal contact with the Supervisor(s) in the first instance.

Candidates wishing to submit an application should prepare and submit the following documentation:

  • The application form which includes a personal statement in which you should detail the particular attributes and/or achievements which make you a suitable candidate to undertake the proposed project
  • Your CV
  • Your degree transcripts
  • Two letters of reference in support of your application

The closing date for receipt of completed applications is Friday, 3 March 2017. Applications should be emailed to Adeline Callander, Graduate School Administrator.

Leverhulme Collections Scholarship application form


Promoting the Nation: Scotland’s industrial films

This Leverhulme funded PhD studentship will explore the nexus between film and industry in mid to late twentieth century Scotland. The project will centre on the work of the Scottish Film Council, which sought to foster the relationship between the two. The successful candidate will draw on the extensive collection of industrial films and paper records held by the National Library of Scotland’s Moving Image Archive (located in Glasgow). In the course of developing a richly contextualised historical analysis, activities may also involve locating relevant holdings in other archives and identifying and interviewing key individuals.

Context and Aims
In contemporary film policy, state intervention in film production and institutional support for film culture are routinely framed in terms of the ‘creative industries’, and as such, sit within a larger creative economy rhetoric, whereby creative sector development is positioned as a means by which urban areas can overcome post-industrial decline and develop new economic opportunities. While often critiqued as a negative turn for film policy – prioritising market forces and employability over aesthetic value and cultural representation – it is widely understood as the product of a late 1990s, New Labour strategy designed to revalue the cultural and creative sectors and fill the void left by the Thatcherite retreat from state intervention in the arts. However, analysis of the Glasgow based Scottish Film Council (SFC), and particularly its Industrial Panel (1946-1976), provides an opportunity to examine an earlier instance of a policy intervention that sought to conceptualise film and its contribution in relation to the wider economy. By exploring the industrially focused production, networking and educational activities of the SFC, this project will consider not only the promotion and representation of Scottish industry to the world through film but also the way the SFC attempted to position film as both an industry in its own right and a facilitator of other industries.

The last decade has seen the development of two significant new areas within historical film studies. First, scholarly interest has expanded beyond fiction feature films and aesthetically valued documentary forms, to consider the full range of educational, industrial, instructional and otherwise ‘useful’ types of film that make up so much of the volume of film archive holdings. Second, attention has turned to the history of film culture itself, and the policies, organisations and individual agents that have sought to shape it at local, national and supra-national levels. By focusing on the work of a state funded film support agency in producing and promoting industrial film, this project will explore the point at which these two fields intersect, contributing to debates within both, whilst also reshaping our understanding of Scottish film history in relation to discourses of national cinema and representation. And, through examination of the difference between the SFC’s approach and that of the more art and experimentation focused British Film Institute, it will also offer a historical perspective on very current issues of policy divergence and devolution.

Applicants
Applications are welcome from students with interests in various areas, including non-fiction and non-theatrical film history; cultural policy; national cinema and film production; industrial history. Applicants must have an undergraduate degree (2:1 or better), and a Masters degree in Film Studies, History, or a cognate subject area in the social sciences, or arts and humanities. Experience of archival research would be extremely beneficial but is not absolutely essential.

This project belongs to the Material thematic cluster. The successful candidate will be supervised by Dr Melanie Selfe, Prof Philip Schlesinger (both Centre for Cultural Policy Research) and Dr Rebecca Harrison (Film and Television Studies).

Candidates interested in applying for funded PhD study on this project are encouraged to make informal contact with the Supervisor(s) in the first instance.

Candidates wishing to submit an application should prepare and submit the following documentation:

  • The application form which includes a personal statement in which you should detail the particular attributes and/or achievements which make you a suitable candidate to undertake the proposed project
  • Your CV
  • Your degree transcripts
  • Two letters of reference in support of your application

The closing date for receipt of completed applications is Friday, 3 March 2017. Applications should be emailed to Adeline Callander, Graduate School Administrator.

Leverhulme Collections Scholarship application form


Counting the Forks:

 A quantitative approach to the development of a literary genre

This project aims to investigate ways of bringing together publicly-available large-scale online resources, in this case Google Books, and the unique and distinctive collections of the University, in this case Special Collections’s rare holding of around 80 early Victorian novels of fashion and high society. The University of Glasgow’s collection represents a large proportion of the total output of novels in a genre called ‘silver fork’ fiction. A nineteenth-century publishing phenomenon something akin to the ‘sex and shopping’ novels of the 1980s, ‘silver fork’ fiction was named in recognition of its fetishisation of luxury household goods. Silver fork fiction depended heavily on its claim to capture the most up-to-date in conversation, ‘brands’, social behaviour and fashionable knowledge: each silver fork novel is thus a kind of mini-collection, a shop-window – or now, a museum display – for its time. The genre also had a short lifespan and is thus reasonably delimitable.

The project has three stages. First, the silver fork collection will be digitised; the project will then use these digitised texts to produce a computational comparison of every possible group of 4 contiguous words in each novel with every possible group of 4 contiguous words in three collections of already-available digitised texts: (a) a collection of core ‘culture’ texts of English literature, including the King James Bible and the plays of Shakespeare, (b) a collection of newspaper and periodical writing contemporary with the silver fork novels, and (c) a collection of non-silver fork novels of the same period. These three collections will be derived in large part from Google Books and from other corpus resources held at Glasgow. This comparison will be aided by statistical methods which will determine those phrases which occur significantly more frequently in the silver fork novels when compared to the three other collections. Finally, these comparisons will be used to generate a set of network maps exploring the ways in which silver fork fiction borrowed from other kinds of writing, cannibalised its own earlier texts, and generated its own distinctive expressions. The project will draw on, and seek to develop and extend, techniques under development by the Literary Lab at Stanford and by digital humanities scholars such as Franco Moretti (Stanford), Matt Jockers (Nebraska-Lincoln), and Daniel J. Cohen (Digital Public Library of America), and which will be extensible to a wide range of literary and other text-based research contexts.

The objectives of the research will be – amongst others – to:

  • Explore the use of quantitative methods in tracing the history of a genre of popular literature
  • Develop our detailed understanding of the ways in which literary influences affected the development of early nineteenth-century fiction
  • Contribute to the current rapid growth in the application of network theory methods to innovative literary analysis.

Applications are welcome from students with interests in various areas, including English Literature, English Language, or cognate subjects in the Arts or Humanities, or from students in Statistics or Data Analysis. Applicants must have an undergraduate degree (2:1 or better), and a Masters degree in a relevant subject. For applicants from the arts or humanities, experience of quantitative methods would be extremely beneficial but is not absolutely essential; for students from statistics or data analysis, a demonstrable interest in literature is extremely beneficial but not absolutely essential.

This project belongs to the Conceptual thematic cluster. The successful candidate will be supervised by Prof Alice Jenkins (English Literature) and Prof Marc Alexander (English Language and Linguistics).

Candidates interested in applying for funded PhD study on this project are encouraged to make informal contact with the Supervisor(s) in the first instance.

Candidates wishing to submit an application should prepare and submit the following documentation:

  • The application form which includes a personal statement in which you should detail the particular attributes and/or achievements which make you a suitable candidate to undertake the proposed project
  • Your CV
  • Your degree transcripts
  • Two letters of reference in support of your application

The closing date for receipt of completed applications is Friday, 3 March 2017. Applications should be emailed to Adeline Callander, Graduate School Administrator.

Leverhulme Collections Scholarship application form


Collecting the Contemporary World:

The Aesthetics and Ethics of War and Conflict in Contemporary Art

This project will consider how contemporary artworks deal with the ethical and aesthetic complexities that attend the representation of war or conflict today. More specifically, it will address how an institutional collection of such works might contribute to an understanding of sites of conflict and contestation in the contemporary world. There have been a number of signal artworks and many significant critical publications related to such matters over recent years. Artists have been prompted to interrogate anew the links between war and visual culture, and to contest mainstream representations of violent conflict, in responding to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, to the wars and conflicts in ex-Yugoslavia, to genocide in Rwanda, to drone warfare and the visual technologies of contemporary warfare, for instance. Books such as Ariella Azoulay’s The Civil Contract of Photography (2012), Judith Butler’s Precarious Life: The Power of Mourning and Violence (2006) and Frames of War: When is Life Grievable? (2009), Rosalyn Deutsch, Hiroshima After Iraq: Three Studies in Art and War, Retort’s Afflicted Powers: Capital and Spectacle in a New Age of War (2005), and Eyal Weizman’s The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza (2012) have all shaped new debates around the particular forms of violence today and their impact on the world. These works and these critical interventions provide the background for this PhD project.

In recent years the Gallery of Modern Art Glasgow (GoMA) has, via the financial support of the Art Fund, acquired significant artworks by a range of renowned international artists that speak to these issues. These acquisitions include works by leading international artists such as Omer Fast, Emily Jacir, Walid Raad, Hito Steyerl, and Fiona Tan, amongst others. Many of these works present a globalised perspective, many also deal with war, violence and political memory in specific times and places. The relationship(s) of Glasgow and of GoMA’s audiences to the sites represented in the international contemporary art collected will be a key focus of inquiry. Dr Katrina Brown (Director of The Common Guild, Glasgow), who worked as Associate Curator with GoMA on the Art Fund International acquisitions, will contribute to the supervision of the project.

The objectives of the research will be (amongst others):

  • To develop detailed critical understanding of key contemporary artworks in the collections of Glasgow Museums pertaining to war and conflict.
  • To research the extant critical literature on the aesthetic and ethical issues raised by artworks which represent war.
  • To examine the strategies by which artists question the political and epistemological status of photographic and filmic images of war and conflict.
  • To address the specific constellation of works in GoMA’s collection and what it means for them to co-exist in that context.
  • To contribute to Glasgow Museums’ research and interpretation material on key works.
  • To consider how new militarised visual technologies and cultures are informing the production of art that takes war as its subject matter.

Applications are welcome from students with interests in, variously: modern and contemporary visual art; aesthetics; war and conflict studies; critical theory. Applicants must have an undergraduate degree in History of Art, Film Studies, Fine Art, or Visual Studies (2:1 or better), and a Masters degree in History of Art or a cognate subject area in the social sciences, or arts and humanities. Applications will be considered from individuals holding an undergraduate degree in a relevant subject (2:1 or better), and a professional career history that would be likely to compensate for research training at Masters level.

This project belongs to the Ethical thematic cluster. The successful candidate will be supervised by Dr Dominic Paterson (History of Art), Dr Vassiliki Kolocotroni (English Literature) and Dr Katrina Brown (Director, The Common Guild).

Candidates interested in applying for funded PhD study on this project are encouraged to make informal contact with the Supervisor(s) in the first instance.

Candidates wishing to submit an application should prepare and submit the following documentation:

  • The application form which includes a personal statement in which you should detail the particular attributes and/or achievements which make you a suitable candidate to undertake the proposed project
  • Your CV
  • Your degree transcripts
  • Two letters of reference in support of your application

The closing date for receipt of completed applications is Friday, 3 March 2017. Applications should be emailed to Adeline Callander, Graduate School Administrator.

Leverhulme Collections Scholarship application form


Collecting Criminal Statistics:

The Creation and Development of Sexual Offences

Criminal statistics are a particular type of collection, often taken to be neutral, tracking normative categories established elsewhere in the criminal justice system: the number of crimes of a particular sort committed in any given year; the number of convictions; the type of disposal and so on. At most they provide evidence of shifts in the incidence of certain crimes and punishment – and thus are taken as a broad measure of the effectiveness of criminal justice. It has been recognised that the relationship between statistics and the field that they measure is considerably more complex: creating particular objects, facilitating particular forms of intervention, and inscribing a particular relationship between state and society. However, there has been surprisingly little analysis of the development of criminal statistics, or of their relation to categories of criminal law or criminal populations and this project will aim to explore ways in which data has been collected and used in the development of modern criminal justice.

The area of sexual offences has the potential to offer unique insight into this relationship. Sexual offences is a relatively new category of the criminal law. From the first official usage of the term in 1956, this area of the law has expanded rapidly as new offences have been created and existing offences reformed, leading to the codification of the law in statutes in 2003 (England and Wales) and 2009 (Scotland). The development and refinement of criminal law categories has been closely linked to the collection of data about the incidence of sexual offences, the circumstances in which such offences were committed, the characteristics of sexual offenders, and how those accused of sexual offences were tried and disposed of in the criminal justice system. The proposed research will trace the specific forms of data that were collected about offences, how particular forms of conduct were identified and recorded as ‘sexual’ and how this information fed back into both the policy-making and law reform process to shape the contemporary category of sexual offences and understanding of certain behaviours as requiring criminal legal responses.

The objectives of the research will be (amongst others):

  • To map in a systematic way the broad lines in the development and categorisation of criminal statistics between their inception in 1810 and the present day and to situate this in the context of the development of statistics more generally;
  • To explore the use of criminal statistics in debates about criminal law reform throughout this period, with particular attention to the area of sexual offences, to explore how the understanding of crime in general, and of particular crimes, was shaped by the collection of statistical information;
  • To examine how the breakdown of information about offenders and types of crime can themselves enable the creation of new forms of criminal conduct; and how statistical information is deployed in policy debates about the creation of new crimes;
  • To trace the relationship between crime statistics, legal categories and the human populations they produce and organise;
  • To contribute to contemporary debates about the ongoing reform of the law in the area of sexual offences.

Applications are welcome from students with interests in, variously: criminal law; the history of criminal law; criminology; or gender studies. Applicants must have an undergraduate degree in Law, Sociology or Criminology (2:1 or better), and a Masters degree in Law, or a cognate subject area in the social sciences, or arts and humanities. Applications will be considered from individuals holding an undergraduate degree in a relevant subject (2:1 or better), and a professional career history in that would be likely to compensate for research training at Masters level.

This project belongs to the Ethical thematic cluster. The successful candidate will be supervised by Prof Lindsay Farmer (Law) and Dr Sarah Armstrong (Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research).

Candidates interested in applying for funded PhD study on this project are encouraged to make informal contact with the Supervisor(s) in the first instance.

Candidates wishing to submit an application should prepare and submit the following documentation:

  • The application form which includes a personal statement in which you should detail the particular attributes and/or achievements which make you a suitable candidate to undertake the proposed project
  • Your CV
  • Your degree transcripts
  • Two letters of reference in support of your application

The closing date for receipt of completed applications is Friday, 3 March 2017. Applications should be emailed to Adeline Callander, Graduate School Administrator.

Leverhulme Collections Scholarship application form