Centre for Open studies

Centre for Open studies


Courses for adults

Archaeology, Classical Studies and Egyptology

Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia

Mesopotamia: the Assyrians of ancient Iraq - a day school in association with the British Institute for the Study of Iraq

Assyria in ancient Iraq amassed a mighty empire in the first millennium BCE. Through archaeology and cuneiform inscriptions we investigate Assyrian cities, including Nineveh with its magnificent palaces. Assyrian kings were warriors and scholars: highlights include Sennacherib's campaign against Jerusalem and Ashurbanipal's remarkable library. This is the 5th Mesopotamia day school run in association with The British Institute for the Study of Iraq.

Frances Reynolds BA PhD
19148 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 22 March 2014
(1 meeting)

Egyptology spotlight - the Middle Kingdom

Five centuries after the building of the pyramids at Giza, Egypt surged to its feet again, shaking off a hundred years of disunity. Innovations abounded, particularly in realms of literature, art and warfare. In this short course, we'll meet some of the most remarkable pharaohs Egypt ever saw and we'll come to understand the vast contribution the so-called Middle Kingdom made.

Angela McDonald MA MPhil DPhil and Margaret Maitland Hon BA MPhil
19144 £43.00 (£)
19.00-21.00 Tuesdays from 28 January 2014
(4 meetings)

Ancient Egyptian funerary archaeology

This course provides an introduction to ancient Egyptian burial practices from Predynastic times to the Coptic period. In each session, we will look at how funerary architecture such as mastabas, pyramids and tombs changed in response to politics and religious beliefs, as well as the development of burial equipment and the art of mummification.

Claire Gilmour MA MLitt
19202 £43.00 (£)
18.30-20.30 Thursdays from 6 March 2014
(4 meetings)

Egyptian temples of the Delta: diversity and variability in religious practice

Egyptian temples were the houses of the gods and the storehouses of centuries of theological knowledge. This course will seek to investigate the diversity of religious practice based in the temples of the northern Delta of Egypt, where Canaanite storm gods became Seth, hellenistic rulers negotiated power with nationalistic priests, the Mother of the sun suckled crocodiles and magicians ruled.

Penelope Wilson BA PhD
19150 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 15 February 2014
(1 meeting)

Hieroglyphs reading group

For those with an elementary background in reading Ancient Egyptian texts, this course will introduce the monuments and language of the Old Kingdom. Specifically, we will read inscriptions about life and service under the pyramid-building pharaohs from the tombs of Ptahshepses and Rawer. In this way, you will get to know some distinctive features of Old Egyptian language and writing while taking a journey back to earliest history in the 3rd millennium BC. Ancient Egyptian Texts 1A plus Ancient Egyptian Texts 1B (or equivalent ability) essential for entry. Contact us if you’d like to take this class in the evening.

William Manley BA PhD
26097 £83.00
  
14.00-16.00 Thursdays from 8 May 2014
(8 meetings)

Ancient Egyptian texts 1B

We will build upon skills and knowledge acquired in Ancient Egyptian texts 1A. We will continue to look at and read the hieroglyphic monuments of ancient Egypt, including funerary and royal inscriptions.

William Manley BA PhD
1482 £107.00
  
 Level  
14.00-16.00 Thursdays from 16 January 2014
(11 meetings)

Ancient Egypt in 8 objects from Scottish museums

Experience Ancient Egypt through our very own Scottish collections. Each week we’ll focus on one object from a museum in Scotland to explore all sorts of little-known and unusual facets of ancient Egyptian culture and society. Throughout the course, we’ll study some genuine Egyptian objects from the Hunterian’s rich collections. You can either attend this course in person or online!

Angela McDonald MA MPhil DPhil and Claire Gilmour MA Mlitt
26090 £83.00
  
14.00-16.00 Wednesdays from 7 May 2014
(8 meetings)

Sumerian for beginners

Come along as a complete beginner (or with rusty experience!) and learn how to read Sumerian inscriptions of ancient Mesopotamian kings written in cuneiform (wedge-shaped) script. We also investigate Sumerian culture through archaeology, art and texts. Sumerian, the world’s oldest written language, was spoken in Mesopotamia (Iraq) in the third millennium BCE. Reading Sumerian opens the door to a rich and amazing ancient world. This course serves as an introduction for beginners and a next step for those who took it two years ago, including new texts.

Frances Reynolds BA PhD
26205 £60.00
18.00-21.00 Monday 14 July - Thursday 17 July 2014
(4 meetings)

Archaeology, including Later Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Warlords and Holymen – the emergence of Scotland

How did the Kingdom of Scotland emerge from among the diverse peoples of Northern Britain (the Picts, Gael, Britons, Anglo-Saxons and ‘Vikings’)? How did Scotland become part of Christian Europe? Was there ever a distinct ‘Celtic’ church? This course will introduce you to the challenges posed by the written and archaeological evidence - and the interpretations of historians themselves - in trying to answer such vital questions. The history of the forging of the Kingdom of Scotland is one of fragments and puzzles but it is also a story which goes to the deepest roots of our modern identities - Scottish, British and European.

Partrick J F Parsons MA PGCE
26195 £83.00
  
10.00-12.00 Tuesdays from 22 April 2014
(8 meetings)

Ancient civilisations of the New World:the rise and fall of the Maya

The Americas were colonised by humanity perhaps as much as 40,000 years ago and agriculture and advanced, complex societies developed there independently. After sketching in these early developments the course will explore the rise and fall of one of best known of the advanced societies – the ancient Maya of the jungles of Central America. We will conclude with a look at one excavation which shed light on the Maya collapse – at Xunantunich in Belize.

Euan W Mackie MA PhD FSA
25988 £43.00(21.50)
19.00-21.00 Tuesdays 4 February 2014
(4 meetings)

The Scourge of God: the Vikings in Europe and beyond

Using historical and archaeological evidence, this course follows the Vikings’ movements throughout Europe, the Baltic and Middle East and across the North Atlantic. Students will examine written sources, artefacts and archaeological sites to better understand how people lived and died during the Viking Age, as well as the legacy of the Vikings.

Oliver O’Grady MA (Joint Hons), MPhil, PhD, FSA Scot
22576 £107.00
  
18.00-20.00 Wednesdays from 7 May 2014
(11 meetings)

Shedding light on the dark ages: Scotland AD 400-1100

In the early medieval period, the lands that today make up Scotland were inhabited by Picts, Britons, Scots, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings. Who were these people, and how did these groups interact? This course provides an overview of the religion, art and material culture of this little-known period in history, illustrating through archaeological discoveries that this 'dark age' was anything but.

Oliver O'Grady
2013 £83.00
  
18.30-20.30 Thursdays from 23 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Early medieval sculpture in Scotland and Ireland - HALF-DAY EVENT

This half day offers an introduction to some of the most significant examples of sculpture from early medieval Scotland and Ireland – high crosses, hogbacks, Pictish stones and the St Andrews and Govan sarcophagi. Where are they found, what does their iconography mean and what do they tell us about society and culture in the 4th-12th centuries AD? The course will be followed by an optional visit to see some examples of the stonework discussed.

Claire Gilmour MA Mlitt
26101 £18.00
10.00-14.00 Wednesdays from 11 June 2014
(1 meeting)

Changing places of power in medieval Scotland

This course explores the different types of fortifications and residences that Scottish medieval rulers used to express and maintain political power during the Middle Ages. A field trip to hillforts, castles and palaces in central-eastern Scotland is combined with a class-based lecture giving students an introduction in how to read landscapes of power with knowledge of archaeological and documentary evidence.

Oliver O’Grady MA (Joint Hons), MPhil, PhD, FSA Scot
26207 £45.00
10.00-1600 Sundays from 14 May 2014 + pre trip session 14 May 2014
(2 meetings + pre trip session)

Communities of the dead - burial and belief 2

How did the adoption of Christianity change the way people treated and viewed their dead? As Christian communities evolved across Europe from AD 300 until the Late Middle Ages so too did burial practices and beliefs in the afterlife. This course will consider the ways this evolution of belief is reflected in the churches and graveyards across Christendom and beyond. How were the key concepts of heaven, hell and purgatory reflected in burial practice?

Lindsay H Thomson MA MLitt and Partrick J F Parsons MA PGCE
19160 £63.00 (£)
13.00-15.00 Tuesdays from 15 April 2014
(6 meetings)

Medieval medicine in Britain

Today medicine is scientific and rational, while medieval medicine appears to be a strange mixture of folklore, superstition, sorcery and religion, with any cure being accidental. Although modern and medieval medicine seem to be poles apart, this day course will look at cures and beliefs in medieval Britain to see how close the two actually are.

Anne Paton MA MSc
19142 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 22 February 2014
(1 meeting)

An introduction to archaeological field survey

The Association of Certificated Field Archaeologists (ACFA) was founded by graduates of the CFA at the University of Glasgow in 1987. Its members conduct field surveys (over 100 to date) all over Scotland. This course, taught by members of ACFA, introduces participants to the art of locating, surveying and recording archaeological features in the landscape. Over the course of a weekend, you will not only learn about the processes and equipment involved in archaeological fieldwork, you will have the chance to gain practical experience of both in the field. This course is ideal for anyone interested in taking the Certificate of Field Archaeology. Places are limited, so early booking is recommended. This course will be available for booking early in 2014.

TBA
2226 £TBA
10.00-16.00 each day Saturday 24 - Sunday 25 May 2014
(2 meetings)

Classical Studies

Roads to Orthodoxy? Christianities and Heresies (AD 33 – 451)

How did the Roman world become Christian? The road from the polytheistic world to that of one true God and faith faced many stumbling blocks along the way. This course will explore the many different ‘Christianities’ that appeared on that road and consider how these became defined as heresies – political necessity, cultural practice or purity of faith?

Lindsay H Thomson MA Mlitt
26267 £83.00
  
14.00-16.00 Thursdays from 8 May 2014
(8 meetings)

Four faces of Roman art

From portraits on coins to the heights of Trajan’s Column, this fully-illustrated course surveys major trends in Roman art. Focusing especially on the reigns of Augustus, Nero and Trajan, we will discuss the relationship between art and politics in public life. We will also investigate the impact art had on the Romans' private lives using the wonderful wall paintings of Pompeii and some more personal objects that have survived the centuries.

Marie Martin MA PhD
19154 £43.00 (£)
11.00-13.00 Saturdays from 8 February 2014
(4 meetings)

Latin reading group

This course is aimed at students who have taken Introduction to Latin or otherwise have a rudimentary knowledge of the language. Excerpts from the works of authors such as Ovid, Catullus, Lucan and Cicero will be provided, and classes will explore the grammar and content of the texts, furthering students’ understanding of the language and culture of Ancient Rome.

Fraser Dallachy MA MPhil PhD
26217 £83.00
  
14.00-16.00 Tuesdays from 6 May 2014
(8 meetings)

Art

History of art

Scottish painting and the painting of Scotland in the nineteenth century

The Trustees Academy in Edinburgh was the birthplace of a distinctively Scottish style of painting. In our consideration of this style we will explore the work of artists such as William Quiller Orchardson, John Perttie and William McTaggart, asking what was Scottish about their art, how it related to that of their contemporaries and what image of Scotland they created.

Helen Sutherland MA PhD PGCHE and Ailsa Turner BA PGCE
16221 £18.00
10.00-15.30 Saturday 1 March 2014
(1 meeting)

The work and legacy of the Glasgow Girls at the Glasgow School of Art - Half-Day event

This half-day event provides a fabulous opportunity to go behind the scenes at Glasgow School of Art to discover works created by the Glasgow Girls and their later followers while they were students. You will have the chance to view and discuss ceramics and textiles in the GSA Archives as well as examples of graphic design in the Mackintosh Library.

Rachael Grew MA MPhil PhD
26102 £18.00
10.00-13.15 Monday 12 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Treasures of the Hunterian print collection

The Hunterian has the largest and most important collection of prints in Scotland. This half-day event will introduce students to the collection and provide an insight into its particular strengths. The emphasis will be on the variety of the Hunterian's holdings, from the Renaissance to the 20th century. Please meet at the Hunterian Art Gallery Reception Desk.

Peter Black MA
1865 £13.00
10.00-12.30 Friday 7 February 2014
(1 meeting) Hunterian Art Gallery

A tour of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh

An opportunity to explore developments in portrait painting in Scotland from the sixteenth to the early twentieth centuries in the splendid refurbished Scottish National Portrait Gallery on Edinburgh's Queen Street. The day will be divided into three discussion sessions in front of the paintings. Please meet in the main entrance hall.

Ailsa Turner BA PGCE
2027 £23.00
11.00-15.30 Saturday 29 March 2014
(1 meeting)

Dutch 17th century painting

The 17th century is regarded as the golden age of Dutch painting. The Dutch succeeded in establishing a Republic, independent of Hapsburg rule. Its economy boomed and the art market flourished. New categories of painting developed, celebrating Dutch pride and achievement and reflecting the ideas and concerns of contemporary society. The artists who produced them were as varied in styles as the subjects they painted. This course will assess the remarkable and influential contribution to European painting made by masters such as Rembrandt, Hals, Vermeer, Ruisdael and others, in the historical context of the new Dutch Republic.

Ailsa Turner BA PGCE
1499 £107.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Thursdays from 16 January 2014
(10 meetings)

Scotland through artists’ eyes

In this short event we will meander through the ways Scotland has been imaged and imagined in art, from the early tartan portraits of Scottish notables to Victorian portrayals of Scottish landscape, life and manners and perhaps beyond.

Helen Sutherland MA PhD PGCHE
26098 £10.00
11.00-13.00 Thursday 29 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Going Dutch: 17th century Dutch painting at Kelvingrove Art Gallery - Half-day event

Kelvingrove Art Gallery houses the largest public collection of seventeenth century Dutch paintings in Scotland. A range of works from the Dutch Golden Age and links with Scotland will be explored, including Rembrandt’s acknowledged masterpiece and Ruisdael’s shimmering landscape, displayed to advantage in a beautifully refurbished room. Please meet in the main hall of Kelvingrove Art Gallery.

Ailsa Turner BA PGCE
26096 £10.00
10.30-12.30 Wednesday 11 June 2014
(1 meeting)

Great art collections

This course offers a mini 'grand tour' of some of the world's magnificent art collections. This year we will begin and end in Glasgow, visiting our local collections in Kelvingrove Art Gallery, the Hunterian Art Gallery, the Burrell Collection and GOMA. In between we will travel to a variety of cities including Venice, Los Angeles, Oxford and Copenhagen. We will look at the history and variety of each city's art galleries and study their major paintings.

Maureen Park MA AMA PhD
1976 £83.00
  
13.15-15.15 Tuesdays from 14 January 2014
(8 meetings) Eastwood House, Giffnock

Great art collections

This course offers a mini 'grand tour; of some of the world's magnificent art collections. This year we will begin and end in Glasgow, visiting our local collections in Kelvingrove Art Gallery, the Hunterian Art Gallery, the Burrell Collection and GOMA. In between we will travel to a variety of cities including Venice, Los Angeles, Oxford and Copenhagen. We will look at the history and variety of each city's art galleries and study their major paintings. This course is also offered in Eastwood House, in East Renfrewshire.

Maureen Park MA AMA PhD
1970 £83.00
  
10.00-12.00 Mondays from 13 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Great art collections

This course offers a mini 'grand tour' of some of the world’s magnificent art collections. This year we will begin and end in Glasgow, visiting our local collections in Kelvingrove Art Gallery, the Hunterian Art Gallery, the Burrell Collection and GOMA. In between we will travel to a variety of cities including Venice, Los Angeles, Oxford and Copenhagen. We will look at the history and variety of each city's art galleries and study their major paintings.

Maureen Park MA AMA PhD
1975 £83.00
  
10.00-12.00 Tuesdays from 14 January 2014
(8 meetings) Eastwood House, Giffnock

Art of the northern Renaissance

Many highly esteemed artists and some of our best loved works come from the Renaissance period, which is famous for artistic innovation and key developments in painting and sculpture. Italy was important, but what happened elsewhere? The art of Northern Europe is rich in content, detail, colour and symbolism and reflects the vibrant societies from which it emerged.

Maris Armfield BA MPhil PhD DipEd GDMEd
19210 £83.00
  
12.00-14.00 Tuesdays from 15 April 2014
(8 meetings)

20th century Scottish art

Art has changed enormously in the past one hundred years and Scotland has increasingly played an important part in the development of modern and contemporary art. This course is intended to be a guide to the bewildering array of movements and artists found in this and the last century, starting in the late 1890s and finishing in the present day.

Blair Cunningham BA MFA
2033 £83.00
  
10.00-12.00 Thursdays from 16 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Impressionism 1860-1990

Impressionism is perhaps one of the most famous movements in art history, but how exactly do we define Impressionism? How did it begin? What was it responding to? How did it develop? Why did it end? This course will explore all these questions and more through examining a wide variety of late nineteenthcentury French artists and works.

Rachael Grew MA MPhil PhD
25508 £83.00
  
10.00-12.00 Tuesdays from 15 April 2014
(8 meetings)

A guided tour of the National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh

An opportunity to have a close look at some outstanding examples of European painting from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries in the National Collection. The day will be divided into three discussion sessions in front of the paintings. Please meet at the Information Desk in the Weston Link, entrance from Princes Street Gardens.

Ailsa Turner BA PGCE
19131 £23.00
11.00-15.30 Saturday 26 April 2014
(1 meeting)

Art and propaganda in the Renaissance

This study day aims to illustrate the ways in which art was used in the Renaissance to create images of political and social propaganda. Through comparisons and case studies it will explain how the politics of images reflected the process that secularised religious iconographies for corporate and individual gains, which in turn assisted the leap from medieval to the early modern period of European art.

Elisabetta Toreno Dot.ssa
19115 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 22 March 2014
(1 meeting)

Women artists: from the Renaissance to Now

Have you ever noticed that most of the art works in galleries were created by men? Where are all the women artists? Moving from the Renaissance all the way to the late twentieth century, this course will enable you to discover the work of women artists who have been marginalised or completely forgotten by the history of art.

Rachael Grew MA MPhil PhD
19590 £83.00
  
10.30-12.30 Mondays from 13 January 2014
(8 meetings) Kilmardinny House Arts Centre, Bearsden

Flemish and Dutch painting

The geographical territory in which this study is set comprised a group of 17 independent provinces. In the 16th century, in their struggles for independence from Spanish rule, the 7 northern provinces broke away and established the Protestant Dutch Republic. The 10 southern provinces remained under Spanish influence and Catholic and comprise the Flemish area of these territories. These low countries, all 17 provinces, have provided a star-studded cast of exceptional painters from the 15th to the 17th centuries with a Europe-wide reputation for the quality and ingenuity of their work and the unsurpassed technical skill in the handling of oil paint.

Ian Macdonald DA BA
19067 £93.00
  
13.30-15.30 Thursdays from 16 January 2014
(9 meetings) Pollokshields Burgh Hall, 70 Glencairn Drive

Flemish and Dutch painting

The geographical territory in which this study is set comprised a group of 17 independent provinces. In the 16th century, in their struggles for independence from Spanish rule, the 7 northern provinces broke away and established the Protestant Dutch Republic. The 10 southern provinces remained under Spanish influence and Catholic and comprise the Flemish area of these territories. These low countries, all 17 provinces, have provided a star-studded cast of exceptional painters from the 15th to the 17th centuries with a Europe-wide reputation for the quality and ingenuity of their work and the unsurpassed technical skill in the handling of oil paint.

Ian Macdonald DA BA
19066 £93.00
  
2014 10.00-12.00 Thursdays from 16 January 2014
(9 meetings) Pollokshields Burgh Hall, 70 Glencairn Drive

Flemish and Dutch painting

The geographical territory in which this study is set comprised a group of 17 independent provinces. In the 16th century, in their struggles for independence from Spanish rule, the 7 northern provinces broke away and established the Protestant Dutch Republic. The 10 southern provinces remained under Spanish influence and Catholic and comprise the Flemish area of these territories. These low countries, all 17 provinces, have provided a star-studded cast of exceptional painters from the 15th to the 17th centuries with a Europe-wide reputation for the quality and ingenuity of their work and the unsurpassed technical skill in the handling of oil paint.

Ian Macdonald DA BA
19065 £93.00
  
13.30-15.30 Tuesdays from 14 January 2014
(9 meetings) Wellington Church, 77 Southpark Avenue

Flemish and Dutch painting

The geographical territory in which this study is set comprised a group of 17 independent provinces. In the 16th century, in their struggles for independence from Spanish rule, the 7 northern provinces broke away and established the Protestant Dutch Republic. The 10 southern provinces remained under Spanish influence and Catholic and comprise the Flemish area of these territories. These low countries, all 17 provinces, have provided a star-studded cast of exceptional painters from the 15th to the 17th centuries with a Europe-wide reputation for the quality and ingenuity of their work and the unsurpassed technical skill in the handling of oil paint.

Ian Macdonald DA BA
19064 £93.00
  
10.30-12.30 Tuesdays from 14 January 2014
(9 meetings) Wellington Church, 77 Southpark Avenue

Early Netherlandish art and the Renaissance

Dutch art is a well-studied phenomenon of European art. In recent years its Netherlandish forerunner has also received attention and its participation in the context of Renaissance art has been clarified. Developed within the rise and fall of the Duchy of Burgundy (1363-1477), its characteristics reflect the vibrant economy, the unique spirituality and the multi-cultural environment of the territory. This day event explores these facets through an analysis of the early Netherlandish masters.

Elisabetta Toreno Dot.ssa
19113 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 1 February 2014
(1 meeting)

Glasgow International: an introduction and tour

Glasgow plays an important part in international contemporary art and has a vibrant and dynamic art scene. As part of this, every two years there is an international festival of contemporary art in Glasgow 'Glasgow International'. This class is an introduction to Glasgow as an international art centre and includes an introductory lecture as well as a guided visit to some of the venues.

Blair Cunningham BA MFA
26009 £25.00
10.00-15.00 Thursday 17 April 2014
(1 meeting)

Frances Macdonald at the Hunterian Art Gallery - Half-Day event

This half-day event will enable you to take a detailed look at the work of one of the least-known members of the Glasgow Four: Frances Macdonald. Using the collections at the Hunterian Art Gallery (including a trip behind the scenes to the print room), we will view original pieces of Macdonald’s art, including furniture, book illustrations and her mysterious final watercolours.

Rachael Grew MA MPhil PhD
26095 £18.00
10.00-12.30 Wednesday 7 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Photography

Introduction to digital photography

Have a digital camera? Dont know what all the buttons do? Then come and find out! Learn how to take wonderful pictures with your camera and how to make them even better using the latest Image manipulation software. You will be inspired by a number of practical sessions guiding you through different elements of photography. By the end of the course you should have a wide range of images to be proud of.

Neil Miller
19105 £104.00
  
17.30-19.30 Mondays from 13 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Practical Art

Learning the techniques of famous artists to produce paintings

During the short course the students will compare and contrast the work of two different artists whose paintings can be seen in Kelvingrove or Hunterian Art Galleries. Students will analyse the paintings historically and visually, research the selected artists, make preliminary studies to produce finished artworks using these techniques from their own original ideas. Students should have access to computer and printer, digital camera, books etc (University computer and library access available). Students will be notified of art materials and where to meet on first day prior to course.

Maggie Ramage DA
26000 £190.00
  
10.00-16.00 Monday-Friday from 23 June 2014
(5 meetings)

Practical painting 2

A painting class for beginners or students interested in developing their own work, covering practical aspects of oil painting, acrylic, watercolour and gouache. Individual tuition and support will be offered. Materials are not provided. New students are very welcome.

Irene Macneil BA DipAD
2183 £155.00
  
10.00-13.00 Saturdays from 25 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Creative and drawing painting 2

A creative approach to drawing and painting suitable for both beginners and students with some previous experience. Learn about different materials and painting techniques including acrylics and oils, gouache and watercolour. Materials are not provided. New students are very welcome.

Irene Macneil BA DipAD
2177 £104.00
  
19.30-21.30 Wednesdays from 22 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Drawing and painting 2

This is a practical course, suitable for both beginners and the more experienced. Students will be taught at their own pace and given individual tuition. Various exercises will be given on perspective, sighting and negative spaces in drawing. They will also be taught the importance of tone and colour in their work. New students are very welcome. Materials are not provided.

Sandra Pratt DA
1838 £83.00
  
14.00-16.00 Wednesdays from 15 January 2014
(8 meetings) McKechnie Institute, Girvan

Fine art - drawing and painting 2

The course is designed to develop students' drawing and painting skills and to teach them drawing and painting techniques, using a variety of media. They will learn to see how an artist sees, draw and paint in various styles and learn how artists plan paintings. Possible themes include still life, landscapes, portraits, figures, mixed media and abstract. A small fee will be charged if model is required. Materials are not provided. New students welcome.

Maggie Ramage DA
1824 £155.00
  
10.00-13.00 Thursdays from 16 January 2014
(8 meetings) Netherlee Pavilion, Linn Park Avenue, Netherlee
Further Info

Painting - watercolours and acrylics

Suitable for beginners and those who want to follow a structured course in water based media. Exercises of varying difficulty will be followed covering the various elements of picture making, i.e. composition, colour, tone, texture, pattern etc. Subjects will include still life objects, portraiture and landscape themes. Bring your chosen medium to first class. Materials are not provided. A list of necessary materials will be sent separately.

Julia Gurney BA MA
2042 £104.00
  
19.00-21.00 Mondays from 13 January 2014. Please note there will be no meetings held on 10 and 24 February 2014
(8 meetings) Bearsden Academy, Stockiemuir Road
Further Info

Painting - watercolours and acrylics

Suitable for beginners and those who want to follow a structured course in water based media. Exercises of varying difficulty will be followed covering the various elements of picture making, i.e. composition, colour, tone, texture, pattern etc. Subjects will include still life objects, portraiture and landscape themes. Bring your chosen medium to first class. Materials are not provided. A list of necessary materials will be sent separately.

Julia Gurney BA MA
2047 £104.00
  
13.00-15.00 Wednesdays from 15 January 2014. Please note there will be no meeting held on 26 February 2014
(8 meetings) Guide Hall, John Street, Helensburgh
Further Info

Beginners plus: drawing and painting 2

This course is suitable for students who have completed the absolute beginners classes or who have basic drawing and painting skills. Lessons will be given in application of different types of drawing materials and paint (oils, acrylics etc.). Students will learn how to use the visual artist's working process to plan for a painting through drawing, development and research. Personal choices in materials for simple class projects will be made. Possible themes include still life, landscape abstract, portrait/figure (a small fee will be charged for model if required). Materials are not provided. New students welcome.

Maggie Ramage DA
2054 £175.00
  
13.00-16.00 Wednesdays from 15 January 2014
(9 meetings)
Further Info

Absolute beginners: an introduction to painting techniques

This course introduces the student to various water-based painting techniques in translucent and opaque media in simple exercises. The student will learn the differences between watercolour, gouache and acrylic paint, how to use various methods of application and how to gain texture effects in their work. This course will include an introduction to colour mixing. Themes such as landscape, still life and abstract will be considered. Materials are not provided.

Maggie Ramage DA
1991 £175.00
  
10.00-13.00 Wednesdays from 15 January 2014
(9 meetings)
Further Info

Art - practical painting

A painting class for beginners or students interested in developing their own work, covering practical aspects of oil painting, acrylic, watercolour and gouache. Individual tuition and support will be offered. Materials not provided.

Irene Macneil BA DipAD
1941 £155.00
  
10.00-13.00 Saturdays from 19 April 2014
(8 meetings)

Art - creative drawing and painting

A creative approach to drawing and painting suitable for both beginners and students with some previous experience. Learn about different materials and painting techniques including acrylics and oils, gouache and watercolour. Materials not provided. New students are very welcome.

Irene Macneil BA DipAD
1929 £104.00
  
19.30-21.30 Wednesdays from 16 April 2014
(8 meetings)

Botanical painting and illustration 3

This course is suitable for beginners and intermediate students. We will explore the art of painting and drawing flowers, fruit and vegetables, examining both traditional and contemporary styles. Starting with a visual presentation to inspire, you will develop your own working practice and make your own botanical book. New students are welcome. Materials are not included.

Clare Crines MA BA
19127 £80.00 (£)
18.30-20.30 Tuesdays from 15 April 2014
(6 meetings)
Further Info

Fine Art- Drawing and Painting 3

Maggie Ramage
26099 £116.00
10.00-13.00 Thursdays from 13 March 2014
(6 meetings)

Stained glass 2

This creative course is designed for beginners and those with only a very basic knowledge of glass cutting as well as students who have completed Stained Glass 1. This mixed ability class will have the opportunity to complete at least two projects in tiffany/copperfoil work or leaded work. Students are required to purchase their own materials. The approximate cost for two projects is £75. Nothing should be purchased before discussion with the course tutor on the first day.

Julie Smith
2038 £135.00
  
13.00-15.00 Wednesdays from 22 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Watercolours 2

Julia Gurney
2197 £104.00
13.00-15.00 Wednesdays from 16 April 2014
(8 meetings)

Absolute beginners: an introduction to portrait drawing

This course introduces the absolute beginner to accurate drawing of the human head. The student will learn about proportion and perspective, line, tone texture and colour and how to use various drawing techniques and media. In a series of simple lessons and demonstrations the students will learn how to draw the human head from various angles. A fee will be charged for the model. Materials are not provided. Beginner to accurate drawing of the human head. The student will learn about proportion and perspective, line, tone texture and colour and how to use various drawing techniques and media. In a series of simple lessons and demonstrations the students will learn how to draw the human head from various angles. A fee will be charged for

Maggie Ramage DA
1978 £190.00
  
10.00-16.00 Monday-Friday from 16 June 2014
(5 meetings)

Absolute beginners: learn to draw in a week

This course introduces the absolute beginner to 'seeing' and drawing accurately. The student will learn how to use a variety of drawing techniques and drawing media. The course will consider themes such as portraiture and still life in a variety of styles related to line, tone, shape, form and colours. Materials are not provided.

Maggie Ramage DA
1983 £190.00
  
10.00-16.00 Monday-Friday from 9 June 2014
(5 meetings)

Business and Executive Coaching

Advanced techniques of business and executive coaching

This workshop looks at three approaches to Business and Executive Coaching. Cognitive Behavioural Coaching has its roots in cognitive behavioural therapy. One of the key concepts of this approach has been adapted to generate a challenging yet useful approach to personal change in the field of coaching. The theory of Core Qualities is a facilitative approach to both change and feedback and lends itself well to coaching senior executives and junior managers alike. The final model to look at would be the Catalytic Toolkit. This model brings a holistic approach to coaching that will serve its practitioners well.

Peter Hill MCIPD FIntLM
26229 £395.00
09.00-17.00 Saturday 28 June 2014
(1 meeting)

Core concepts and models of business and executive coaching

There are many models that are used in the world of business and executive coaching. This workshop gives you access to six of these models that allow for reflection, action orientation and the facilitation of change in individuals. The models allow development opportunities for the participants as well as results for their clients. Participants will get the opportunity to see the models demonstrated and practice them under the guidance of the tutor.

Peter Hill MCIPD FIntLM
26232 £395.00
09.00-17.00 Saturday 7 June 2014
(1 meeting)

Transactional analysis

Transactional analysis is critical in getting commitment to action. The complementary transactions and the crossed transactions as well as the ego states are all looked at. The pitfalls that one can fall into, such as the drama triangle are also discussed and practiced. Also covered are ego states, scripts, life positions and flow in this dynamic workshop.

Mary Parker MA MSc MCIPD
26253 £395.00
09.00-17.00 Saturday 17 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Chemistry, contracting and boundaries

Using a fully interactive approach, this course looks at the groundwork required for effective business and executive coaching. Setting the chemistry and taking the temperature to ensure the trust levels are optimum will make the world of difference. The course looks at the three types of contract that are in existence – the operational contract, the commercial contract and the psychological contract. Boundary management ensures that coaches do not stray into the realms of counselling, therapy, mentoring or training. A full and thorough explanation of each is discussed.

Peter Hill MCIPD FIntLM
26226 £395.00
09.00-17.00 Saturday 26 April 2014
(1 meeting)

Coaching supervision

Coaching supervision is essential to maintain the high quality of support and professional development that is needed in this emergent profession. This workshop looks at what is involved and how managerial, educational and restorative supervision is delivered.

Peter Hill MCIPD FIntLM
26230 £395.00
09.00-17.00 Saturday 30 August 2014
(1 meeting)

Motivational interviewing

Motivational interviewing looks at the construction of the conversation and its linguistic influences to reveal the state of mind an individual is in in relation to personal change. Clues, signals and signposts are all discussed and studied in this element. Transactional analysis is critical in getting commitment to action. The complementary transactions, and the crossed transactions as well as the ego states are all looked at. The pitfalls that one can fall into, such as the drama triangle are also discussed and practiced in this interactive workshop.

Mary Parker MA MSc
26231 £395.00
09.00-17.00 Saturday 26 July 2014
(1 meeting)

Computing

An introduction to SQL in one day

SQL is an industry standard language used to access information held in almost every database system in the world. In just one day this practical crash course will introduce you to databases and teach you how to confidently write SQL to search and manipulate the data within them.

Calum Alexander MSc PhD
1981 £82.00
09.30-16.30 Saturday 18 January 2014
(1 meeting)
Further Info

Introduction to Python programming

Python is an intuitive but powerful programming language with which, even as a novice, you can quickly build useful applications. Python is both a 'procedural' and an 'object-oriented' language, and you will learn about this and other features. Python is open source and fun to use. The course will be based on Python 2.7.

Douglas Macdonald BSc MSc PhD
1947 £104.00
  
10.00-16.00 Saturdays from 8 February 2014
(3 meetings)
Further Info

IT and business applications

Business applications is an ideal course for those keen to develop an understanding of IT applications within contemporary organisations. Focusing on ICT, such as Microsoft Office, Social Media and the Internet, we introduce learners to business functions, such as planning, accounts & finance, sales & marketing, management, customer service and communication, discovering best practice across multiple sectors. This is not a beginner’s IT course.

Brian McEwan BA
26233 £130.00
  
10.00-13.00 Tuesdays from 10 June 2014
(6 meetings)

SQL and report writing

SQL along with tools such as Microsoft Report Builder are used to access and analyse information held in database system around the world. In just one day this practical crash course will introduce you to advanced aspects of SQL and teach you how to confidently write SQL for reports which group and summarise data for reporting and analysis.

Calum Alexander MSc PhD
19873 £82.00
09.30-16.30 Saturday 15 February 2014
(1 meeting)

Counselling Skills

COSCA Certificate in Counselling Skills

Counselling Skills course- NEW. Added in repsonse to demand

This COSCA validated course has also been accredited for CertHE credits by the University of Glasgow. The course provides an opportunity to develop and broaden your self-awareness as well as your listening and responding skills. You will be encouraged to develop an understanding of different theoretical counselling approaches as well as developing your own skills in a stimulating and supportive environment. The course is suitable for anyone using their skills in any helping role such as in health, education, social care, business or helpline work. More information and application forms can be found at: www.glasgow.ac.uk/courses/openstudies/certificateincounsellingskills/ tel: 0141 330 1822 email: laureen.sykes@glasgow.ac.uk

Richard Michael McCalmont and Caterina O'Connor
19025 £1300.00
  
18.00-21.00 Thursdays from 16 January 2014
(31 meetings + 4 Saturdays)

Counselling Skills-Other

Counselling skills taster session

Are you interested in the skills used by counsellors to help people? Participation in this session will provide you with a better idea about whether you would like to, or are ready to, embark on a counselling skills training course with all that entails. This is an excellent one day taster session to help you explore these listening and communication skills.

Caterina O'Connor MA CQSW CASS DipCPS DipTP
3278 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 25 January 2014
(1 meeting)

Counselling skills taster session

Are you interested in the skills used by counsellors to help people? Participation in this session will provide you with a better idea about whether you would like to, or are ready to, embark on a counselling skills training course with all that entails. This is an excellent one day taster session to help you explore these listening and communication skills.

Caterina O'Connor MA CQSW CASS DipCPS DipTP
19054 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 24 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Psychodrama: dipping your toe in the water

Described by some as 'a rehearsal for living', Psychodrama focuses on doing, thinking, feeling and reflecting. The active nature of this approach allows students to experience and explore its application therapeutically and educationally. Psychodrama sessions have three distinct and inter-dependent components: warm-up, enactment and sharing. This day event provides insight into the dynamic nature and application of Psychodrama.

Teresa M Brown BA DipCOT Advanced Diploma in Psychodrama
19573 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 26 April 2014
(1 meeting)
Further Info

Egan's solution focused counselling

This short course is for anyone interested in developing their counselling skills or who uses counselling skills in their day-to-day life. It enables you as the worker to become a more effective listener and help your 'client' to explore their issues and establish goals.

Caterina O'Connor MA CQSW CASS DipCPS DipTP
19551 £33.00 (£)
19.00-21.00 Mondays from 17 March 2014
(2 meetings)

Summer school in counselling skills

This course offers entry level students with or without prior training or experience in using counselling skills, the opportunity to spend five days working with accredited trainers to develop communication and counselling skills. This is an ideal course for those who want to explore and develop their listening and responding skills and/or explore their suitability for a career in counselling without committing to initial lengthy courses. Individuals will have the opportunity to enhance their own personal and professional development.

Richard Michael McCalmont BA BACP Counsellor and Caterina O'Connor MA CQSW CASS DipCPS DipTP
19555 £130.00
  
10.00-15.00 Monday-Friday, 16-20 June 2014
(5 meetings)

Working with trauma Easter School

Trauma results when an event or incident overwhelms a person's ability to cope or where it outweighs an individual's personal resources: perhaps resulting in the experience of overwhelming emotion, fear of death and complete helplessness. Insight will be provided of working within the Three Stage Model of Recovery from Trauma, an empowerment model used in many support organizations.

Isabelle Kerr
19553 £130.00
  
10.00-15.00 Monday-Friday, 7-11 April 2014
(5 meetings)

History, International Affairs and Politics

American

Abraham Lincoln

The recent success of the Holywood movie biopic of Abraham Lincoln has once again refocused attention on this remarkable historical personality. Few other figures in modern history have reached such iconic status as Lincoln but behind the endless eulogies and enduring mythologies was a complex, brilliant and flawed individual who nevertheless managed to shape the nature of modern America and with it the world. With particular focus on the complex machinations which led to the historic 13th Amendment permanently abolishing slavery, this day event will trace the course of his life from Kentucky farm to the nation's capital and his place as one of the world's great historical figures.

Robert Lynch BA PhD and Carol Hurley BA MSc
19083 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 8 February 2014
(1 meeting)

The American Civil War

The American Civil War (1861-65) was by far the bloodiest conflict in American history. Arising out of a political crisis over the expansion of slavery, the war set the stage for the emergence of the modern American nation-state. With the use of a wide range of contemporary sources this course explores the causes, course and consequences of this most seminal of conflicts examining its complex origins and its ambiguous and much mythologised legacy.

Robert Lynch BA PhD
16223 £83.00
  
19.30-21.30 Tuesdays from 14 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Republicans in the White House: from Eisenhower to George W Bush

This course examines the lives and legacies of Republican presidents since World War 2. We consider Dwight D Eisenhower, Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and both George H W Bush and George W Bush. What forces shaped them? How did each become president? What did they have in common? What did they achieve? How should we remember them? What can future Republican candidates learn from them?

Robert Hamilton MA DipAdEd MPhil PhD
19939 £83.00
  
10.00-12.00 Fridays from 17 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Remembering the Kennedy Brothers:Jack, Bobby and Ted

The 50th anniversary of the assassination of President Kennedy provides an opportunity to reflect on the lives and legacies of JFK and his brothers Robert and Edward. Their significance has often been obscured by myth and misunderstanding. What forces shaped them? What did each of them achieve? What is the Kennedy legacy today? The course will be supported with film and primary source documents.

Robert Hamilton MA DipAdEd MPhil PhD
26046 £43.00(21.50)
13.00-15.00 Tuesdays from 14 January 2014
(4 meetings)

Slavery in America

This day event will consider slavery in America, providing an overview of the development of slavery and the various forms it took. It will examine particular elements of American slavery, including the slave trade, the economics of slavery, slave resistance and the eventual abolition of slavery.

Simon Cuthbert-Kerr MA PhD
19119 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 8 March 2014
(1 meeting)

European and World

Afghanistan since 2001: from American intervention to withdrawal

Since 2001 Afghanistan has been in the western headlines for a complex variety of reasons - war, terrorism, corruption, failed state-building, counter-narcotics. With a preliminary review of earlier British and Soviet interventions, this course provides an up to date summary of why the state continues to severely challenge western stablization efforts. The tutor is the co-author (with Tim Bird) of Afghanistan How the West Lost Its Way (2011).

Alex Marshall MA MA PhD
1875 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 19 April 2014
(1 meeting)

D Day, June 1944: 70 years on

D-Day, 6 June 1944, occurred seventy years ago. This half-day event will look at the cross-Channel invasion - Operation 'Overlord' - in which British, Canadian, and American forces began the liberation of France and the Low Countries. It will also consider the Red Army's offensive in Belarus - Operation 'Bagration' - which opened two weeks later, on 22 June. Little known in Britain, this attack broke the back of the German army in Russia, and opened the way to Eastern Europe. How did the Wehrmacht attempt to deal with this dual threat from west and east, and which operation was ultimately more important in the defeat of Nazi Germany?

Evan Mawdsley BA MA PhD and Ben Shepherd BA MA PhD
19111 £18.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 7 June 2014
(1 meeting)

The birth of nations - making peoples in the past

What determines ethnic or national identity? Is it where you were born, where you live, how you dress or having a shared 'National' history? With the forthcoming vote on Scottish Independence the issue of identity and history will be central to the debate but how are nations created and why? From the Ancient Israelites to the creation of 'Great Britain' we will look at the reasons and processes which have created peoples in the past, how the 'myths' of nations are forged, how ethnic identities have been manipulated by kings and governments with often catastrophic consequences, and the fundamental role of religion and violence in the 'birth of nations'.

Patrick J F Parsons MA PGCE
19208 £103.00
  
10.00-12.00 Mondays from 13 January 2014
(10 meetings)

Republicans in the White House: from Eisenhower to George W Bush

This course examines the lives and legacies of Republican presidents since World War 2. We consider Dwight D Eisenhower, Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, and both George H W Bush and George W Bush. What forces shaped them? How and why did each become president? What did they have in common? What did they achieve? How should we remember them? What can future Republican candidates learn from them?

Robert Hamilton MA DipAdEd MPhil PhD
19938 £83.00
  
12.45-14.45 Thursdays from 16 January 2014
(8 meetings) Baljaffray Parish Church, Grampian Way, Baljaffray, Bearsden

World War 2 in film and television

This one-day event takes a very broad view of the relationship between film, television, and the war of 1939-1945. The four sessions will cover subjects from the film propaganda of the war years to film and television depictions produced seventy-five years later. Special emphasis will be placed on the interpretation of the war in feature films, considering both the 'home front' and 'war films' dealing with military combat on land, sea and air, and with the POW experience. The session will examine some of these films for historical accuracy, and consider how they might reflect wider social and cultural concerns of the time at which they were made?

Evan Mawdsley BA MA PhD and Ben Shepherd BA MA PhD
19109 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 8 March 2014
(1 meeting)

Scottish, Irish and Local

The Highland clearances revisited

What is meant by the Highland Clearances? Are there other reasons for depopulation? Was emigration always forced and cruel? To which period do we refer when mentioning the Highland Clearances? Come along and look at at least 30 factors which one should take into account when using that term.

Margaret Anderson MA MSc
26128 £10.00
10.00-12.30 Thursday 26 June 2014
(1 meeting)

Research how our Scottish ancestors lived

Explore the domestic lives of your ancestors in this lively, interactive class. We will look at a wide range of sources and use case studies to show how you can develop a detailed picture of your Scottish ancestors at home. Sources will include archives, books, diaries and letters, oral history, maps, illustrations and film.

Ronnie Scott BA MPhil PhD
2272 £18.00
13.00-16.00 Tuesday 1 July 2014
(1 meeting)

Who were the Covenanters?

In a recent poll by the BBC, viewers and experts alike placed the Covenanters among the top ten Scottish history topics. But who were the Covenanters? What were they fighting for? What impact did they have on seventeenth century Scotland? We will consider royalism; the absentee monarchy; religion; interaction between Scotland, England and Ireland; and the importance of oaths.

Kirsty McAlister BA PGCE PhD
26124 £18.00
10.00-13.00 Wednesday 9 July 2014
(1 meeting)

Tommy’s war: a first World War diary

This class explores the Home Front in Glasgow during the First World War, as recorded in the diaries of Thomas Cairns Livingstone, a shipping clerk who lived in Govanhill and worked in the city centre. His daily musings – published as “Tommy’s War: A First World War Diary” – show both a city devoted to supporting the war effort and a family doing their best in trying circumstances.

Ronnie Scott BA MPhil PhD
26133 £18.00
10.00-16.00 Tuesday 5 August 2014
(1meeting)

Who was Mary, Queen of Scots? Day: Wednesday

This course will examine Mary, Queen of Scots, one of the most prominent females in Scottish history. We will discuss her life and times before analysing her reputation during her own lifetime and since her death. We will learn how Mary has been manipulated over the years to suit the particular needs of individuals and group.

Kirsty McAlister BA PGCE PhD
26125 £18.00
10.00-13.00 Wednesday 16 July 2014
(1 meeting)

Who were the Jacobites?

Often the subject of romanticism and myth, the Jacobites remain intriguing and compelling. This class will provide students with an understanding of the origins and impact of the Jacobite movement, and will place Scotland’s experience firmly within its wider British and European context. Was the failure of Jacobitism inevitable?

Kirsty McAlister BA PGCE PhD
26129 £18.00
10.00-13.00 Thursday 10 July 2014
(1 meeting)

Walks around Glasgow 7

Come and find out about the city which is about to host the Commonwealth Games. This is the 7th series of walks due to demand by students. We are moving steadily away from the city centre and finding lots of interesting sides to the city as we do so. This series will look at another side of Bridgeton, at Queen's Park area, Kelvinside (west of Kirklee Road), Ibrox area towards Dumbreck, and further South Side areas. Some of these have always been residential areas, others industrial, and one area has been farmland and then parkland. We can even feature Mary, Queen of Scots this time!! There is no need for students to have done such walks before but they should prepare for the terrain and weather with suitable strong clothing and footwear; there will be hills involved at times. Please avoid umbrellas.

Margaret Anderson MA MSc
19091 £63.00 (£)
10.00-12.00 and 14.00-16.00 Thursdays from 15 May 2014
(6 meetings)

Glasgow in 1814, 1914 and 2014

As Glasgow prepares to host the Commonwealth Games, this course examines three snapshots of the city, in 1814 at the start of its industrial and imperial growth, in 1914 at its height as the Second City of the Empire, and in 2014 as a post-industrial city, reliant on tourism, education and the service economy. Using a wide variety of sources, we study three very different Glasgows.

Ronnie Scott BA MPhil PhD FSA Scot
19100 £63.00 (£)
10.00-12.00 Wednesdays from 16 April 2014
(6 meetings)

The Treaty of Union

In this atmosphere of considering whether we should retain any aspects of the Union and the run-up to the Referendum, it may be interesting to find out exactly what the Treaty said, how it came about, how it nearly came unstuck less than a decade later, and what remained of the clauses a relatively short time later.

Margaret Anderson MA MSc
26136 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Wednesday 25 June 2014
(1 meeting)

West end lectures

In a new series of 8 lectures, experts on Glasgow’s outstanding Victorian and Edwardian West End present fully illustrated talks on its architectural heritage, stained glass, local and industrial history and transport. With an in-depth lecture followed by extended discussion each evening, this series aims to educate and entertain, within a friendly and welcoming atmosphere. The course is hosted throughout by BBC journalist and broadcaster, Colin MacKay.

Gordon Urquhart and others
2105 £83.00
  
19.30-21.30 Wednesdays from 29 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Stirling and its battles

Stirling’s site at the only crossing place of the Forth in a wide area of marshland led to there being a series of key battles in Scotland’s history. We celebrate Bannockburn this year but Stirling Bridge, Sauchieburn, Sheriffmuir and the two battles of Falkirk all have a similar context. This course will look at these battles and why they were fought and why fought there.

Margaret Anderson MA MSc
26123 £10.00
10.00-12.30 Tuesday 24 June 2014
(1 meeting)

Scotland 1603-1707: Union of the Crowns to Union of the Parliaments

In the year of the referendum for Scottish independence, this class will briefly examine the relationship between Scotland and England in the 17th century, from the dynastic union in 1603 through to the incorporating union of 1707. Was the Treaty of Union of 1707 an inevitable consequence of what happened in 1603? Why did union negotiations succeed in 1705-7 when a number of previous attempts had failed?

Kirsty McAlister BA PhD PGCE
19071 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 24 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Bannockburn 1314 - winning a nation?

The stunning victory of Robert Bruce over the English at Bannockburn was a watershed in the struggle for Scottish independence, but it is shrouded in myths and popular misconceptions - even the location of the battlefield is hotly debated. This day event will strip away these myths and look at the reality of Scotland’s greatest triumph over the ‘auld enemy’. Placing the battle firmly within the world of medieval chivalry, we will look at why, where, and how the battle was fought and discuss its overall significance for Scottish national identity, past and future.

Patrick J F Parsons MA PGCE
26161 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 21 June 2014
(1 meeting)

Scotland and the First World War: war and the civilian population

This second half-day event will consider the effect of the war on Scotland and include: the effect of voluntary enlistment and the military service acts on industrial output; the ‘dilution’ of the labour force by women; ‘red Clydeside’ and rent strikes; food rationing and social restriction; the opposition to the war; and loss and commemoration.

Craig Haggart PhD MA
26126 £10.00
13.30-16.00 Tuesday 3 June 2014
(1 meeting)

Treasures of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow

This half-day event will provide an introduction to the wealth of historical material held at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow and will range from early printed books, surgical instruments through to contemporary art. Participants will get the opportunity of seeing many of the items at first hand as we tour the building.

Carol Parry BA MA
26216 £10.00
10.00-12.00 Thursday 15 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Secession, self-determination and independence: Scotland in historical and comparative context

This one day event will examine the nature of secessionist movements and evaluate the history of self-determination in an historical and comparative context since 1917. It will discuss movements that have been successful and those that failed. Special attention will be paid to cases where secession has been achieved peacefully. We will ask why the international community is so reluctant to accept secession and investigate whether it is possible to establish rules that would allow secession to be achieved without violence. Scotland will be placed in a comparative context with other secessionist movements such as Quebec and Catalonia

Brian Girvin BA MA PhD FRHS
26162 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 17 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Ireland: from Union to Independence

In the context of the upcoming referendum on Scottish independence, an understanding of Ireland’s experience of self-rule becomes increasingly relevant. This course will examine that experience from the trauma of revolution and partition through to the ‘Troubles’ in Northern Ireland and the recent economic implosion of the southern economy. With the use of a wide range of primary sources we will ask to what extent the breaking of the Union can be judged a success or failure by looking at areas such as Irish identity, minority experience, state foundation myths, economic nationalism and the lasting legacies of violence and division.

Robert Lynch BA PhD
26160 £83.00
  
10.00-12.00 Saturdays from 10 May 2014
(8 meetings)

Scotland and the Empire Plus 5: the Scots and what they achieved

Come and discover the role that Scots had throughout the world, in the Empire and elsewhere, as well as what happened back in Scotland linked to this. In the services, as teachers and missionaries, farmers, and traders, as explorers - and indeed in some less admirable roles - were where Scots might be found. The Antipodes will be where we resume the study of this topic and South America will be among the places we'll consider this time. You don't have to have done previous ones to come to this course.

Margaret E Anderson MA MSc
19076 £103.00
  
12.45-14.45 Mondays from 13 January 2014
(10 meetings) Baljaffray Parish Church, Grampian Way, Baljaffray, Bearsden

Scotland 1286-1371

Between 1286 and 1371 no fewer than four dynasties ruled Scotland. This was a turbulent period when Wars of Independence were also punctuated by civil war. Was Robert Bruce truly the salvation of Scotland? Were the Scottish nobles overly concerned with lands in England, consequently abandoning Scotland's cause? Was the Declaration of Arbroath a heartfelt plea or merely political rhetoric?

Craig Haggart MA PhD
16237 £83.00
  
19.30-21.30 Thursdays from 16 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Scotland and the First World War: mobilising for war - Half-day event

We will examine Scotland’s contribution to the British war effort to include: the above average proportion of fighting men in the British Army; the provision of home bases for the Royal Navy; the development of aeroplanes and airships; the commandeering of merchant shipping for wartime service; and an industrial output increasingly diverted to war production.

Craig Haggart PhD MA
26100 £10.00
10.00-12.30 Tuesday 3 June 2014
(1 meeting)

Scotland: the making and the governance of the medieval kingdom

Beginning in the 9th century, we will study the expansion of the kingdom from the core territory of Alba, looking at the careers of individual monarchs and examining the foundation and growth of state institutions, concluding with the reign of Alexander III.

Irene Hughson MA FSAScot
19594 £93.00
  
10.00-12.00 Tuesdays from 14 January 2014
(9 meetings) Glen Hall, Neilston
Further Info

National identity in Scotland

This one day event will consider the issue of national identity in Scotland from an historical, social and political perspective. We shall examine Scottish society and the Scottish political system and look at how national identity underpins our institutions, behaviours and political outcomes. This course will provide insight into the nature of contemporary Scotland, important in the light of the 2014 referendum.

Murray Stewart Leith BA MA PhD and Duncan Sim BA PhD
19125 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 7 June 2014
(1 meeting)

Scotland in the 18th Century: the aftermath of Union

This course will examine thematically the most important aspects of Scotland in the 18th century. Beginning with the Union of 1707, we will go on to discuss popular politics and reform, including the impact in Scotland of the American and French revolutions; agricultural revolution and early industrialisation, with emphasis on the textile industry; Jacobitism; demographic change and urbanisation; religion; the Enlightenment; and education.

Kirsty McAlister BA PhD PGCE
19069 £83.00
  
13.00-15.00 Wednesdays from 15 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Walks around Glasgow 8

Come and find out about the city which is about to host the Commonwealth Games. Enjoy this 8th series of walks where we move largely further from the city centre in several directions. Some of the areas have rich residential buildings, others have an interesting industrial history, some still contain the original developments while other are ghosts of their past. Townhead/Port Dundas, Pollokshields West, Pollokshaws, Langside, Dalmarnock - the site of the Commonwealth Games, and Kinning Park are planned for this series. Students are advised to come well clad and shod for whatever weather Glasgow chooses to give us. Umbrellas are discouraged but light-weight binoculars would be an advantage.

Margaret Anderson MA MSc
19093 £63.00 (£)
10.00-12.00 Tuesdays from 22 April 2014
(6 meetings)

The IRA: a secret history

The Irish Republican Army - the IRA - is one of the most controversial organisations of modern times. For many it carries the connotation of lawless murderers. For others, it represents romantic rebels, underdogs, willing to sacrifice all for a unified and republican Ireland. In this half-day event we will examine the long and bloody history of this organisation. We will end by looking at the current peace process and the fact that even after forty years the IRA, in the shape of the Dissidents, is still an active and dedicated organisation.

Robert Lynch BA PhD
19085 £15.00
13.00-16.00 Saturday 3 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Walks around Glasgow 6

Come and find out about the city which is about to host the Commonwealth Games. Discover areas away from the city centre. This 6th series visits another part of Govan, part of Pollokshields, Bellahouston Park, part of Bridgeton, Temple to Maryhill, and the Claythorn district. We see a range of different areas of the city - industrial or formerly so, residential and parkland, all with fascinating aspects to them. There is no need to have done any previous walks courses but you must be prepared with suitable footwear and clothing for what Glasgow's weather or terrain might provide. Umbrellas are not encouraged. There can be steep terrain. The walks are neither strolls not too brisk. It is all worth it for this interesting city.

Margaret Anderson MA MSc
19089 £63.00 (£)
10.00-12.00 and 14.00-16.00 Thursdays from 24 April 2014
(6 meetings)

Languages

Arabic

Arabic Stage 1

Beginners course concentrating on modern standard Arabic for daily use: we cover introductions, greetings, farewells, thanks/apologies and move on to questions and answers on many topics (nationality, occupations, travel, using phones, shopping etc). The basic elements of reading and writing Arabic will be introduced.

Mustapha Akoub DPSI LLM
1738 £200.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Thursdays from 10 October 2013
(20 meetings)

French

Film study in French

Veronique Miller
26331 £60.00
12.45-14.45 Thursday 24 April 2014
(6 meetings)

Gaelic

Irish Gaelic for beginners

This is a taster class for people new to Irish Gaelic, where useful phrases will be learned in a friendly atmosphere through pair/group work. The language will be put into context with cultural background, folklore and songs, touching on the different dialects.

Alison Ní Dhorchaidhe
26206 £10.00
10.00-12.00 Saturday 24 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Ùlpan Gaelic Taster - Units 1 and 2 (free event )

Ùlpan is a fast and effective way to learn Gaelic which has been used to great effect in Israel to teach Hebrew and in Wales to teach Welsh. Speaking comes first, and reading and writing follow a little later. You learn through repetition of key structures and through language activities, with a strong emphasis on speaking the language. More information at: www.ulpan.co.uk

To be advised
26201 £FREE
10.00-13.15 Saturday 17 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Ùlpan Level 2 - Units 25-48

TBA
25972 £200.00
17.30-19.00 Mondays and Wednesdays from 13 January 2014
(22 meetings)

Ulpan Taster- Units 1 and 2

TBA
26021 £0.00
10.00-13.15 Thursday 18 January 2014
(1 meetings)

Ulpan Level 3 (Units 49-72)

TBA
26296 £200.00
17.30-19.00 Mondays and Wednesdays from 14 April 2014
(24 meetings)

Italian

Italian Stage 1

For complete beginners in which useful structures and language learning will be practised through paired/ group activities, role play, songs etc. By the end of Stage 1 students will be able to handle everyday situations in Italian (mainly in the present tense), and possibly be able to talk a bit about the past.

To be advised
26155 £200.00
  
10.00-12.30 Tuesdays and Fridays from 27 May 2014
(16 meetings)

Italian Stage 2

A revision of the main structures from Stage 1. Everyday topics of conversation such as leisure, sport, travel, hobbies etc; other topics as requested by students. Introduction to the perfect and imperfect tenses.

To be advised
26156 £200.00
  
13.00-15.30 Tuesdays and Fridays from 27 May 2014
(16 meetings)

Italian Stage 1

For complete beginners in which useful structures and language learning will be practised through paired/group activities, roleplay, songs etc. By the end of Stage 1 students will be able to handle everyday situations in Italian (mainly in the present tense), and possibly be able to talk a bit about the past.

Cristina Gislason DipAdEd LLM
2140 £200.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.30 Thursdays from 16 January 2014
(16 meetings)

Spanish

Spanish Stage 1

A course for complete beginners in which useful structures and language learning will be practised through paired/group activities, role-play, games, songs etc. By the end of Stage 1 students will be able to handle everyday situations in Spanish (mainly in the present tense), and be able to talk a bit about the future and be introduced to the past tenses.

To be advised
26157 £200.00
  
13.00-15.30 Tuesdays and Fridays from 27 May 2014
(16 meetings)

Spanish Twice a Week Stage 1

This is the standard Spanish Stage 1 course except that by meeting twice a week students complete the course in only 10 weeks. For people in a hurry to learn Spanish!

Mavourneen Watkins MA
1776 £200.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Mondays and Thursdays from 13 January 2014
(20 meetings)

Spanish Stage 2

For students who have completed Stage 1 or equivalent. Talking about various experiences in the past; telling fortunes; situations/vocabulary identified by students; the preterite, perfect, imperfect and future tenses.

Victoria Reina Gil
26158 £200.00
  
10.00-12.30 Tuesdays and Fridays from 27 May 2014
(16 meetings)

Literature, Creative Writing and Film

Creative Writing

Writing for wellbeing

Learn how to use writing for self development. Expressive or therapeutic writing promotes both physical and emotional wellbeing. Writing can provide simple, quiet, private, focused, forms of reflection and paying attention to one's own self. Writing can help deal with stress and anxiety. This course will look at the many types of writing strategies from daily pages, journaling, dialogues, to exploring choices and decisions.

Nikki Cameron BA MLitt
1904 £83.00
14.00-16.00 Fridays from 17 January 2014
(8 meetings)

An introduction to creative writing 3

This daytime course introduces you to all kinds of creative writing. Try your hand at writing short stories, novels, non-fiction and drama, in an informal and supportive atmosphere. The classes are suitable for everyone, but nervous beginners are particularly welcome.

Cathy McSporran BA MLitt PhD
1955 £83.00
  
13.30-15.30 Thursdays from 17 April 2014
(8 meetings)

An introduction to creative writing 2

This daytime course introduces you to all kinds of creative writing. Try your hand at writing short stories, novels, non-fiction and drama, in an informal and supportive atmosphere. The classes are suitable for everyone, but nervous beginners are particularly welcome.

Cathy McSporran BA MLitt PhD
19049 £103.00
  
13.30-15.30 Fridays from 17 January 2014
(10 meetings)

Writing fiction

This course will focus on the discussion of students' fiction. Topics such as tone, perspective, character, use of detail and dialogue will be examined and a range of different literary forms and structures will be discussed.

Alan McMunnigall BA
19043 £83.00
  
19.00-21.00 Tuesdays from 15 April 2014
(8 meetings)

Writing fiction: the short story

This course will focus on the discussion of students' fiction and will involve a range of approaches to the creation of fiction. Extracts from novels and short stories will be examined in order to learn more about literary strategies and techniques. The main form discussed will be the short story.

Alan McMunnigall BA
19044 £103.00
  
19.00-21.00 Tuesdays from 14 January 2014
(10 meetings)

Write a short story

In this course we will look at aspects of the short story such as structure, narrative techniques and themes. There will be discussion of some published short stories and students will have the opportunity to experiment through writing exercises. By the end of the class each student will have written a new short story.

Pamela Ross BA Mlitt
26228 £18.00
10.00-14.00 Monday 4 August 2014
(1 meeting)

Film

Alfred Hitchcock 2

Following on from the first day-class on Hitchcock's early UK career, this day-class focuses on his Hollywood films, including such classics as Vertigo and Psycho. What are differences between Hitchcock's British and Hollywood films? Did his move to Hollywood represent a significant change in his filmmaking style? How did his distinctively British sensibility and humour translate into an American context? New students welcome.

Christopher Gow MA PhD
19567 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 22 February 2014
(1 meeting)

Literature

'What Maisie Knew' and 'The Great Gatsby'

The design of this course is set on Henry James writing before, and F Scott Fitzgerald writing after, the First World War and changing forever the possibilities of the Novel. Their intentions are comparable in these two novels but their sympathies diverge. Maisie and Jay Gatsby know different things but with the same absolute vision. Central to the study is Fitzgerald's idea of life as a performance and James's concept of survival as what Maisie calls "the stuff of poetry and tragedy and art". Each writer believed in books as keys and this will be the search of this course.

Anne Scott MA
19216 £103.00
  
13.00-15.00 Wednesdays from 15 January 2014
(10 meetings)

Three Scottish short novels

In this course we will study three Scottish short novels written in three different centuries: The Man of Feeling by Henry Mackenzie (published in 1771); The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson (1886); and A Working Mother by Agnes Owens (1994). Through group discussion we will compare and contrast these novels. We will consider theme and structure and analyse the novels in relation to their cultural, social and historical contexts.

Pamela Ross BA MLitt and Alan McMunnigall BA
26227 £104.00
  
18.00-20.00 Mondays from 9 June 2014
(8 meetings)

'Such a strange lady' the life and writings of Dorothy L Sayers

Dorothy L Sayers is best known for her creation of the sleuth Lord Peter Wimsey, but she also translated Dante's Inferno and wrote popular theology. Focussing on the detective fiction we will explore relationships between these aspects of Sayers' work, setting them within the context of her life which caused one biographer to describe her as a 'such a strange lady'.

Helen Sutherland MA PhD PGCHE
19579 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 19 April 2014
(1 meeting)

Reading Shakespeare

Join us for a friendly play reading of one of Shakespeare’s most popular comedies. We will look at ‘As You Like It’ from a performance perspective exploring the ways in which the comedy could be staged. This course is an opportunity to read through the play and act in selected scenes in an informal and supportive group.

Susan Miller MA BD PhD
26132 £83.00
  
14.00-16.00 Thursdays from 1 May 2014
(8 meetings)

Influential Scottish plays

Join us for a friendly play reading of three of the most influential modern Scottish plays: The Gorbals Story by Robert McLeish, The Cheviot, the Stag and the Black, Black Oil by John McGrath and The Steamie by Tony Roper. Each week there will be an opportunity to take part in an informal reading and performance of these plays.

Susan Miller MA BD PhD
26092 £83.00
  
18.00-20.00 Thursdays from 1 May 2014
(8 meetings)

Staging Shakespeare

Join us for a screening of the award-winning Globe Theatre production of Twelfth Night with Mark Rylance as Olivia and Stephen Fry as Malvolio. There will be a short introduction to the staging of Twelfth Night in Shakespeare’s time. We will then discuss the staging and acting style of the Globe production and examine its impact on us today.

Susan Miller MA BD PhD
26127 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 5 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Scottish community theatre

Join us for an exploration of the development of community theatre in Scotland. We will look at the work of Glasgow Unity Theatre and examine the plays of Ena Lamont Stewart, Joe Corrie and Robert McLeish. We will then assess their influence on Scottish theatre today.

Susan Miller MA BD PhD
26135 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 17 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Crossover fiction

Do you enjoy books which are popular with teenagers? In recent years fiction enjoyed by both adults and young adults (the latter a fluid concept itself) has often been placed in a category of its own, and sometimes published in two separate editions for its two readerships. How far is this a genuinely new genre, reflecting social changes, or just a marketing ploy? We shall examine some examples of crossover fiction to try to determine where its appeal lies, particularly for adult readers, and how it is related to the various forms of traditional adult and children's fiction. A detailed booklist will be available from the Centre for Open Studies.

Ann Karkalas MA MLitt
19220 £83.00
  
10.00-12.00 Mondays from 20 January 2014
(8 meetings)
Further Info

The renaissance of the Blackfriars Theatre

In August 1608, Shakespeare's acting company, The King's Men, took over the lease of The Blackfriars Theatre on the Thames. It’s possible 'The Tempest' was staged here and then Webster, Marston, Jonson, Beaumont - Shakespeare's friend. In 1642 it was closed as the Civil War advanced. Now it will be rebuilt beside The Globe on Bankside, from 17th Century drawings, and will open in January 2014 with 'The Duchess of Malfi', and 'The Knight of the Burning Pestle' in February. This unusual and detailed course is about the design, the effect of different woods on hearing and atmosphere, the carpentering, the stage-making, the galleries, the lighting, the ways illusion is created, and what it is to act in such a place, and write for such a place. And there will be scenes from 'The Knight of the Burning Pestle', Beaumontt's funny and glorious double-comedy.

Anne Scott MA
19218 £63.00 (£)
13.00-15.00 Wednesdays from 16 April 2014
(6 meetings)

Twentieth century English poetry

The course will study a selection of major poets in English from the first half of the 20th century. Poets studied will include Hardy, Housman, Eliot, Yeats, Auden and Larkin. We will consider the break (as well as the continuities) with the 19th century poetic tradition and attempt to relate the texts studied with the modernist movement of the new age.

Patrick Reilly MA BLitt
19583 £83.00
  
10.00-12.00 Thursdays from 16 January 2014
(8 meetings) Rhuallan House, Giffnock

Now read the book: short stories 2

While film adaptations of novels often have to leave much out, those based on classic short stories can allow their themes to blossom in a different medium. This course will read, watch and discuss a number of stories and their film versions, looking at the art of adaptation as well as individual tales which inspired Stand By Me, Don't Look Now, The Adjustment Bureau, Rear Windows, and others. Extracts and film clips will be provided. New students welcome.

Andrea Mullaney MA PGDip
19236 £93.00
  
14.00-16.00 Mondays from 13 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Literature, Creative Writing and Film

Alfred Hitchcock 1

With Vertigo topping Sight and Sound’s most recent once-a-decade poll of the greatest films ever made, and recent film and television productions such as The Girl and Hitchcock, interest in Alfred Hitchcock’s work is as strong as ever. This class explores the director’s early UK career, which witnessed the transition from silent to sound cinema, before his success in Hollywood.

Christopher Gow MA PhD
19565 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 15 February 2014
(1 meeting)

Music

Music

The orchestral season in Scotland 2

This course introduces some of the music to be played by Scotland's orchestras in the second half of the 2013-14 Season. We shall examine a wide range of repertoire in detail, and will also explore relevant artistic and organisational issues that concern all the orchestras. Threads running through the whole season's concerts include American music, romantic symphonies and the music of Richard Strauss.

Hugh Macdonald BMus MLitt ARCO
2093 £63.00 (£)
14.00-16.00 Wednesdays from 5 February 2014
(6 meetings)

Reading and writing music 5

This course is for those who have completed Level 4 or equivalent. It reinforces previous knowledge of music theory and enhances competence in analysis, aural awareness and musicianship. Skills in arranging, composition and written harmony will be developed. Computer-aided learning, listening and practical activities are important features of the course. Please contact the department for advice regarding prerequisites.

Moira Ann Harris BMus PhD LTCL PGCE
3272 £130.00
  
19.15-21.15 Tuesdays from 15 April 2014
(6 Tuesday meetings + 1 Saturday)
Further Info

Opera afternoons: Sir Walter Scott and European opera

A Duke of Rothesay, the Lammermuir Hills and Loch Katrine adorn Scott-based operas. Works, some very familiar, by Rossini, Donizetti, Boieldieu, Bizet and Marschner will be examined. The Scott craze is explored in the bicentenary year of the start of the Waverley novels. We look for what appealed to composers in this author’s works: was it setting, plot or characters?

Stuart Campbell and Moira Harris
2089 £83.00
  
14.00-16.00 Mondays from 13 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Reading and writing music 1 (intensive)

This course introduces the fundamentals of reading and writing music. Rhythm and pitch notation, scale formation as well as elementary sight-reading and composition will be included, allowing you to sing or learn to play a musical instrument with confidence. Computer-aided learning and practical work will be important features of the course.

Moira Ann Harris BMus PhD LTCL PGCE
2069 £130.00
  
13.00-16.30 Monday-Friday, 4-8 August 2014
(5 meetings)

Reading and writing music 4

This course is for those who have completed Level 3 or equivalent. It further extends knowledge of music theory and enhances competence in analysis, aural awareness, composition and sight singing. It reinforces the foundations of musicianship, written harmony and arranging. Computer-aided learning, listening and practical activities are important features of the course. Please contact the department for advice regarding prerequisites.

Moira Ann Harris BMus PhD LTCL PGCE
19029 £130.00
  
19.15-21.15 Tuesdays from 14 January 2014
(10 meetings)
Further Info

Reading and writing music 2

This course develops the skills of students with some experience of reading and writing music. It introduces the fundamentals of music theory and develops competence in sight reading and composition. It may also assist those preparing to sit a recognised examination. Computer-aided learning and practical activities will play a significant part in the course.

Moira Ann Harris BMus PhD LTCL PGCE
2067 £130.00
  
19.15-21.15 Mondays from 13 January 2014
(10 meetings)
Further Info

Essential musical classics 2

Over the last hundred years or so, composers have often been attracted to the same large-scale musical forms. This course will take a broad look at some musical genres which are not limited to any one historical time but which continue to challenge and invigorate composers for centuries after the forms were evolved - primarily opera, oratorio and the concerto. New students are very welcome.

Liam Devlin MA BMus MSc LRAM ARCM FRSA FSAScot
19179 £83.00
  
10.00-12.00 Tuesdays from 14 January 2014. Please note there will be no meeting held on 11 February 2014
(8 meetings) Guide Hall, John Street, Helensburgh

Essential musical classics 2

Over the last hundred years or so, composers have often been attracted to the same large-scale musical forms. This course will take a broad look at some musical genres which are not limited to any one historical time but which continue to challenge and invigorate composers for centuries after the forms were evolved - primarily opera, oratorio and the concerto. New students are very welcome.

Liam Devlin MA BMus MSc LRAM ARCM FRSA FSAScot
19182 £83.00
  
14.00-16.00 Wednesdays from 15 January 2014. Please note there will be no meeting held on 12 February 2014
(8 meetings) Steeple Hall, Kilbarchan

Essential musical classics 2

Over the last hundred years or so, composers have often been attracted to the same large-scale musical forms. This course will take a broad look at some musical genres which are not limited to any one historical time but which continue to challenge and invigorate composers for centuries after the forms were evolved - primarily opera, oratorio and the concerto. New students are very welcome.

Liam Devlin MA BMus MSc LRAM ARCM FRSA FSAScot
19181 £83.00
  
10.00-12.00 Wednesdays from 15 January 2014. Please note there will be no meeting held on 12 February 2014
(8 meetings) Eastwood Theatre, Giffnock

Essential musical classics 2

Over the last hundred years or so, composers have often been attracted to the same large-scale musical forms. This course will take a broad look at some musical genres which are not limited to any one historical time but which continue to challenge and invigorate composers for centuries after the forms were evolved - primarily opera, oratorio and the concerto. New students are very welcome.

Liam Devlin MA BMus MSc LRAM ARCM FRSA FSAScot
19180 £83.00
  
14.00-16.00 Tuesdays from 14 January 2014. Please note there will be no meeting held on 11 February 2014
(8 meetings)

Philosophy and Religious Studies

Philosophy and Religious Studies

The Dead Sea Scrolls

In 1945 a shepherd accidentally discovered a hidden store of scrolls in caves near the Dead Sea. These scrolls were produced by a community who lived at Qumran. This day event asks: who were the members of the Qumran community? What were the main beliefs found in the scrolls? What impact do the scrolls have on our understanding of Judaism and Christianity?

Susan Miller MA BD PhD
26134 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 10 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Philosophy and Religious Studies

Philosophy and Religious Studies

God, faith, science and reason: an introduction to the philosophy of religion

Is there a God? How do we answer that question? Can we? Should a rational person follow a religion and also believe in the results of natural science? What is a religion, anyway? This course will provide answers to these and related questions by examining some of the classic arguments discussed in the philosophy of religion by Telephone enrolments: +44 (0)141 330 1860/1853 Email: openstudies-enquiry@glasgow.ac.uk Website: www.glasgow.ac.uk/centreforopenstudies 29 great historical thinkers such as Plato, Leibniz and Hume, as well as more contemporary figures such as Alvin Plantinga.

John Donaldson MA MSc
25797 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 17 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Life, the universe and everything: an introduction to philosophy

What is philosophy? What is it to philosophise? What do philosophers do? This course will answer these questions by charting the history of modern philosophy up to the present day, covering all the main areas of philosophy: metaphysics, epistemology (the study of knowledge and justified belief), value theory (the study of ethical, political, religious and aesthetic value), and logic (the study of reason). Along the way, the work of key figures from throughout the history of philosophy will be discussed, including Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill, and Russell, as well as more contemporary thinkers.

John Donaldson MA MSc
25795 £83.00
  
14.00-16.00 Wednesdays from 15 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Devolution and power

Modern continental thinkers have had quite a lot to say on power in post 1945 philosophy. This day event will look at some of that work with a view to the coming Scottish Referendum. The course should stimulate discussion from a number of angles.

Keith Hammond MA MPhil
19264 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 22 February 2014
(1 meeting)

Ethnic cleansing and the dark side of democracy

After 1945 and knowledge of the Holocaust, the general thinking was that anything similar could never be allowed to happen again. Yet genocidal acts still happen! This class will look at the work of Michael Mann who argues that ethnic cleansing has never really gone away. He links it to the dark side of democracy. This class looks at that situation and it should initiate some really challenging debate.

Keith Hammond MA MPhil
19266 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 29 March 2014
(1 meeting)

The human situation - an introduction to Existentialism

The course will discuss the ideas of key existentialist thinkers. Some of the themes discussed include the nature of freedom, engagement, authenticity and bad faith, and being: in what sense is a person free? What role does meaning play in our lives? How should we live? The course also explores the background against which existentialist thought takes place.

Paul Harkin MA MPhil PhD
25788 £83.00
  
19.00-21.00 Wednesdays from 15 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Buddhism 2

This course is a follow-on from Buddhism 1 and is also for those who have an overall understanding of what Buddhism is. It offers a mix of Buddhist philosophy and Buddhist practice as well as a look at the relationships to western philosophy. There are two tutors each with different expertise in Buddhism from which to draw.

Kenneth Hutton BA MPhil PhD & Venerable Rewatha Thero BA MA PGDE
25789 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 3 May 2014
(1 meeting)

20th Century Philosophy

The 20th century witnessed some of western philosophy’s greatest figures: Bertrand Russell, G E Moore, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Rudolf Carnap, Jean-Paul Sartre, Willard Van Orman Quine, Thomas Khun, and Michel Foucault. This course explores the ideas of these and many other mighty thinkers by charting the progress of philosophy during the better part of the last 100 years. This course provides an excellent grounding in the recent history of the issues that form the cutting edge of philosophy today.

John Donaldson MA MSc
19262 £83.00
14.00-16.00 Tuesdays from 14 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Science fiction and philosophy: going boldly where no day event has gone before

Against the backdrop of science fiction, this day school will teach the application of the techniques of analytic philosophy to examine life, the universe, and everything. Ideas common in science fiction which also form the basis for famous philosophical thought experiments will be examined, including: (1) Time Travel - if I travel back in time and kill my grandfather what happens? Is this even possible? What does considering these questions tell us about the nature of reality? (2) Personal Identity: If I step into a Star Trek type teleporter, but it malfunctions and creates two copies of me while destroying the original, which copy is me? Neither? Both? What does considering such cases tell us about what is required for a person to persist (i.e. remain the same person) through time? (3) The Matrix - what justification do we have for believing that the world is as it appears? Can you know that you are not in the Matrix, or a brain in a jar being supplied experiences by electrodes, or a disembodied mind being deceived by a malevolent demon? What does considering these questions tell us about the nature of knowledge, perception, and our relationship with the world?

John Donaldson MA MSc
25801 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 1 February 2014
(1 meeting)

It's alive! The philosophy of artificial intelligence

Can machines be conscious? If not, why not? If machines can be conscious, then can they be conscious in the same way as you and I? What obstacles stand in the way of the present generation of machines becoming conscious? If conscious machines are built in the future then what happens to human beings? This day school will address these and many similar questions, drawing on the latest research in cognitive science and philosophy of psychology. It should be fun.

John Donaldson MA MSc
19268 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 26 April 2014
(1 meeting)

Life, the universe and everything: an Introduction to philosophy

What is philosophy? What is it to philosophise? What do philosophers do? This course will answer these questions by charting the history of modern philosophy up to the present day, covering all the main areas of philosophy: metaphysics, epistemology (the study of knowledge and justified belief), value theory (the study of ethical, political, religious and aesthetic value), and logic (the study of reason). Along the way, the work of key figures from throughout the history of philosophy will be discussed, including Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill, and Russell, as well as more contemporary thinkers.

John Donaldson MA MSc
25795 £83.00
  
14.00-16.00 Wednesdays from 15 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Psychology

Sport and exercise psychology: the power of the mind

This event will demonstrate the power of the mind in shaping performance. It will explore some intriguing psychological states and introduce techniques that can be used to overcome challenges such as anxiety and low motivation. Many of the issues discussed apply to all areas of life so you do not need to be involved in sport to enjoy this course.

Jane McKay BSc MSc PhD
1927 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 22 March 2014
(1 meeting)

Interpreting children's drawings

What can we learn from children's drawings? Do they provide a unique insight into the mind of a child? How useful are they as a tool for assessing intellectual development? Students will have an opportunity to explore several theoretical perspectives on children's drawings. Students are encouraged to bring children's drawings with them to the class.

Victoria O'Donnell BA PG Cert Ac Prac PhD CPsychol
19473 £25.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 22 February 2014
(1 meeting)

Mindfulness, Buddhism, health

Mindfulness is valuable for anyone wishing to open the door to a fuller, richer experience of life. It’s a way of waking from the half-life of habit, knee-jerk reaction and limiting self-views, allowing individuals to engage with a more active, conscious role in life. Drawn from the Buddhist meditation tradition Mindfulness is fast gaining respect in the worlds of healthcare, business, and sport as a way to enhance wellbeing and effectiveness.

Richard Michael McCalmont BA BACP Counsellor
26137 £104.00
  
10.00-15.00 Monday - Thursday from 02/06/2014
(4 meetings)

Mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR)

This course teaches skills to manage stress and anxiety; thus improving focus, creativity and attention. Teaching methods will include guided meditations, inquiry into experience and direct teaching. Guidance is provided for home practice which will enhance personal experience. An essential preparation for anyone who aims to use mindfulness approaches with their students, patients or clients. *Please bring a yoga mat or equivalent to class*.

Alastair Storie
19569 £83.00
  
19.00-21.00 Tuesdays from 15 April 2014
(8 meetings)

Developing children's thinking

This course will examine a number of perspectives on how to foster children's/young people's capacity to think clearly and well. Strategies will be considered which support the development of critical and creative thinking. The rationale for each will be explored and a practical approach to the day-to-day application of these will be taken, to deepen and extend thinking.

Margaret Kirkwood BSc MEd PhD
19278 £83.00
  
19.00-21.00 Tuesdays from 21 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Movies and mental illness: the portrayal of mental illness in film

How is mental health and illness represented in film? This course will give you the opportunity to enjoy thought provoking films that indirectly or directly highlight mental health issues. On alternate weeks there will be the opportunity to discuss the films, with a focus on the representation (and misrepresentation) of mental illness in film and the psychology that underlies this.

Kate Reid PhD
19274 £83.00
  
19.00-21.00 Wednesdays from 22 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Science

Astronomy

Highlights of astronomy

The science of the universe beyond Earth changes faster than ever. In this course we will take a close look at some hot topics, from near-Earth space all the way to galaxies and the Big Bang, as well as at the huge telescopes used to make these discoveries. A little previous knowledge will help but is not essential.

Alec MacKinnon BSc PhD, H A S Reid BSc PhD and others
19032 £83.00
  
19.30-21.30 Mondays from 13 January 2014
(8 meetings)

Astronomy when the skies are bright

In Scotland our summer skies are never dark but there’s no need to turn your back on the cosmos altogether. We’ll take a look at sky phenomena of summer nights, at the Sun, at ‘Citizen Science’ and other internet activities and radio astronomy, and ask if there are ways of peeking out at the universe even through the bright summer evenings.

Alexander L MacKinnon BSc PhD FRAS and others
26130 £22.50
10.00-15.00 Saturday 24 May 2014
(1 meeting)

Weighing the Earth on Schiehallion, Perthshire

Schiehallion is a hill in Perthshire, Scotland, that was used for a ground-breaking attempt to estimate the mass of the Earth in 1774 by Nevil Maskelyne. This involved measuring the precise position of stars high on the slopes of the hill and the invention of contours to describe its shape. We will explore - partly in the classroom and on a full day’s visit to the actual hill - the history and science behind this fascinating experiment. The class will meet at Schiehallion in Perthshire.

Andrew Conway BSc PhD FRAS
26208 £35.00
19.00-21.00 and 10.00-16.00 Wednesday and Saturday from 18 June 2014
(2 meetings)

Processing your astrophotos

Looking at the night sky through a telescope can sometimes be disappointing because many deep sky objects are so faint. Photography overcomes the problem and this basic image processing course indicates how to maximise the detail captured in digital images using computer software. Complements Imaging the Night Sky course.

Douglas Cooper BA BSc MInstP
19646 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 15 February 2014
(1 meeting)
Further Info

Biology

Birdsong identification

As spring approaches we awaken to the dawn chorus welcoming the new day. Why do the birds sing so cheerfully? How do they produce such variety of song? Which bird produces which call? This short course will answer all these questions and more.

Stewart White PhD PGCE(FE)
2101 £24.00 (£)
Mon 19 May 2014 19.00-21.00 & Sat 24 May 2014 06.30-08.30
(2 meetings)

Identification of wild plants

This course teaches you how to identify wild plants that grow in the Glasgow area. Five weeks will be spent indoors looking at the main diagnostic features used for identifying wild flowers. This will be followed by visits to five local sites to look at plants and their habitats. The course will interest anyone who wishes to improve their knowledge of botany as well as teachers or countryside rangers involved in environmental education. Meetings: - Tuesdays from 18 March 2014. Indoor meetings: 18 March, 25 March, 1 April, 8 April, 29 April Field trips: 6 May, 13 May, 20 May, 3 June, 10 June 2014

Keith Watson MSc
2005 £130.00
  
19.00-21.00 Tuesdays from 25 March 2014
(10 meetings)
Further Info

Marine mammal field course

This course will introduce you to the diversity, behaviour and ecology of seals, whales and dolphins. We focus on learning how to identify and record the behaviour of UK species and study how they are adapted to their aquatic existence. The course includes lectures, laboratory sessions and field work on research vessels in the Firth of Clyde and on whale watching boats of the west coast of Scotland. The course is residential (8 - 18 July 2014) and is based at the University Marine Biological Station, Millport (UMBSM) and at Tobermory, Isle of Mull. This course involves part-time and full-time students from four participating UK universities. Fees: £214.00 + Field Course Costs: approximately £700.00 (to be confirmed) £100.00 deposit on enrolment and full costs paid 2 months prior to field course.

Dominic McCafferty PhD and others
1478 £214.00 + Field Course Costs
  
 Level  
Residential 12-19 July 2014 (Residential)
Residential

Freshwater ecology

This course introduces you to the characteristics of freshwaters by examining their physical and biological characteristics. You will learn about the major threats to Scottish freshwaters and ways they may be mitigated or prevented via conservation measures. Coursework will be delivered by distance learning (Semester 2) and will involve group discussion work, assignments and reading. This will then be followed by a 3 day field-course (15-17 March 2014) at the Scottish Centre for Ecology and the Natural Environment where you will use ofa variety of techniques to sample freshwater systems and identify species. Online (semester 2) and residential: 15-17 March 2014 Fees: £214.00 + Field Course Costs (full board): £160.00 £100.00 deposit on enrolment and full costs paid 2 months prior to field course.

John Hume PhD and others
22177 £214.00 + Field Course Costs
  
 Level  
Online & residential Online & residential
(11 meetings)

Mammal identification

The course will introduce you to the abundance and diversity of mammals in Scotland and most importantly how to identify them. This is a hands on practical course carried out in a field setting on a residential weekend at the Scottish Centre for Ecology and the Natural Environment (SCENE), Loch Lomondside. During this field course you will learn best practice in live trapping and handling small mammals. Camera traps will be used to record nocturnal species and you will develop identification skills from tracks and trails.

Victoria Paterson MSc PhD and others
19871 £93.00
Residential 31 May - 1 June 2014 (Residential)
(2 days) Residential

Earth Science

Scottish gold

This half-day course is being run in tandem with the Scottish gold exhibition which will be running at the same time in the Hunterian Museum. Based around the exhibition themes, the course will look in more detail at various aspects of gold in Scotland, including the geology of gold, its occurrence in Scotland, the history of mining, working and using gold in Scotland from archaeological pre-history, to the present day, and its role in Scottish history and culture.

John Faithfull BSc PhD and others
19051 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 8 March 2014
(1 meeting)

Geological Study Tour to South East France, Spring 2014

A seven day geological study tour to SE France is proposed for Spring 2014. This two-centre field study, based on Nice and an inland locality, is an area where the Alpine and Pyrenean mountain trends meet. We will look at the sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks of Provence, the Cote d'Azur, and the southern Alps, including coastal sections. Please contact the Centre for Open Studies to place your name on a mailing list, when you will receive details and costs as they become available.

Judith Lawson and Mike Keen
19196 £ To be confirmed
Spring 2014

Geology in the field

Field studies and examining rocks in the field are the basis of all geology. We will examine the geology and geomorphology of a series of areas within easy reach of Glasgow. Following an introductory meeting when plans and venues will be discussed, there will be five full-day excursions by private car. Walking will generally be easy, and no prior knowledge of geology needed. Meeting times: 10.00-13.00 Introductory meeting + 5 full day excursions (10.30-16.30)

Christopher Burton BSc PhD FGS and James G MacDonald MBE BSc PhD
1933 £122.00
  
10.00-13.00 Intro meeting;10:30-16:30 excursions Wednesdays from 23 April 2014

Volcanoes and the environment

Volcanoes play a vital role in the physical and chemical systems that make the Earth a habitable planet. We will explore the different types of volcanic activity, their geographical distribution, and the part they play in maintaining the viability of the atmosphere and the surface of the Earth's crust, and volcanic hazards. Examples will be drawn from volcanic activity in the Hawaiian Islands, Iceland, Canary Islands, the Hellenic Arc and other areas.

James G MacDonald BSc PhD
19600 £63.00 (£)
19.30-21.30 Wednesdays from 5 February 2014
(6 meetings)

Lunar geology - origin and history of the earth's moon

We will explore the origins of the Moon from a geological perspective, gaining practical experience in the construction and use of lunar geological maps. We will review knowledge of the Moon’s interior and the insights it gives about the Moon's origins. Finally, we will consider what lunar science can tell us about the origins of the Earth and solar system.

Simon J Cuthbert BSc PhD
19644 £30.00
09.30-16.30 Saturday 1 February 2014
(1 meeting)
Further Info

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