Centre for Open studies

Centre for Open studies


Courses for adults

Archaeology, Classical Studies and Egyptology

Archaeology and the Material World

Understanding archaeology

How does modern life influence the study of the past? This course introduces the theory, practice and responsibilities of archaeology. Using real-life examples as case studies, we will explore the latest issues and controversies affecting archaeologists today.

Amanda Charland BA MLitt PhD
16343 £115.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 23 September 2014
(11 meetings) Campus

Shedding light on the dark ages: Scotland AD 400-1100

In the early medieval period, the lands that today make up Scotland were inhabited by Picts, Britons, Scots, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings. Who were these people, and how did these groups interact? This course provides an overview of the religion, art and material culture of this little-known period in history, illustrating through archaeological discoveries that this ‘dark age’ was anything but.

Oliver O'Grady MA MPhil PhD FSA Scot
17520 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Thursday 29 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

The archaeology of huntergatherers: the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic of Northern Britain

Using archaeological, environmental and ethnographical evidence and object-handling sessions, this course explores aspects of huntergatherer lifeways across the Paleolithic (13600-9600 BCE) and Mesolithic (9600-3600 BCE) periods. We’ll study people’s patterns of life, the customs marking their deaths, and their changing landscape of melting ice-sheets, tsunamis and other ecological events. Our focus is Northern Britain, but we’ll draw upon similar evidence from north-west Europe.

Dene Wright MA MLitt PhD
17901 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Church archaeology in Scotland and its neighbour

Using architectural, historical and archaeological evidence, this course explores the development and role of the medieval Christian church in Scotland and its neighbours. Students will examine documentary sources, buildings and archaeological sites to better understand the function of the church in religious belief, society and governance during the medieval period, and the architectural legacy of the medieval church.

Oliver O'Grady MA MPhil PhD FSA Scot
18059 £88.00
  
19.00-21.00 Thursday 29 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

The archaeology of religion

Day/half-day Event Rich artwork, striking symbolism and stunning buildings clearly played a major role in the great religions of the past. But how can archaeologists understand the religious beliefs of people who lived a thousand years ago? Join us as we examine buildings, art and objects to reconstruct the religious experiences and practices of three major religions - Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

Michael Given BA PhD
18436 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 21 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Egyptology and the Ancient Near East

The art of Ancient Mesopotamia - A day school in association with BISI

Day/half-day Event The world's first civilizations and empires emerged in Mesopotamia (ancient Iraq) in the period 3500-500 BC. Through the extraordinary art recovered by archaeologists - ranging from delicate carvings in ivory to huge panels of carved stone - we will investigate what these images can tell us about the politics and religious beliefs of the Sumerians, Babylonians and Assyrians.This is the 6th Mesopotamia day school run in association with The British Institute for the Study of Iraq. Each is a stand-alone course.

Paul Collins MA PhD
16424 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 28 March 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

Literature of the Ancient Near East

This course introduces students to the wider Near Eastern world through three sets of case study texts comparing Mesopotamian literature and its themes with more familiar Egyptian material. Students will use these primary sources as evidence for reconstructing life in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and as a basis for exploring cultural differences. Texts include The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Laws of Hammurabi, The Dispute of a Man with his Soul and The Tale of Sinuhe. This course can be studied online.

Angela McDonald MA MPhil DPhil and Claire Gilmour MA Mlitt
17248 £115.00  Level  
14.00-16.00 Tuesday 12 May 2015
(11 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Ancient Egyptian art

We will look at the art of Ancient Egyptian tombs and temples, and the ideas and beliefs associated with them. Students will be expected to learn about the basic techniques and principles of the ancient artists, as well as specific masterpieces of Egyptian art. Particular emphasis will be put on how to use artworks as a primary source for the study of the history and culture of Ancient Egypt.

Angela McDonald MA MPhil DPhil
16801 £115.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 23 September 2014
(11 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Ancient Egyptian Temples

We will explore the architecture of Ancient Egyptian tombs and temples, and the ideas and practices associated with them. Students will be expected to learn about different types of Egyptian temple, as well as specific temples such as the pyramid complexes of Giza and the temples of Thebes. Particular emphasis will be put on how to use archaeological sites as a source for the study of Ancient Egypt, and on how to interpret archaeological sites in their social and historical context.

Claire Gilmour MA MLitt
17102 £115.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 13 January 2015
(11 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Egyptology Project

This course allows students to follow up their previous studies in Egyptology and to take their interest in this specific subject area further. In doing so, students will build up their confidence This new opportunity is for students who are aiming to complete the Certificate in Egyptology , allowing them to take their interest in a specific subject area within Egyptology further. In doing so, students will build up their confidence for working independently using discussions with their peers and tutor rather than the formal support structure of a class. In carrying out their research, students will identify and respond to the appropriate scholarly writings, form their own opinions and develop skills in extended essay writing.

Angela McDonald MA MPhil DPhil
16712 £230.00
  
 Level  
Week beginning 22 September 2014
Campus

Introduction to Ancient Egypt 1A

This course covers the background necessary for students to read and write confidently about the history and social life of the Ancient Egyptians from earliest history until the New Kingdom, c.3100-1500 BC. Students will learn about politics, religion and the rule of the Pharaohs in Egypt at this time, and also about the wider history of the ancient world as revealed through Egypt’s interaction with other nations.

William Manley BA PhD
18061 £115.00
  
 Level  
14.00-16.00 Thursday 25 September 2014
(11 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Introduction to Ancient Egypt 1B

This course builds upon skills and knowledge acquired in Introduction to Ancient Egypt 1A, but can be taken separately. It covers the background necessary for students to read and write confidently about the history and social life of the Ancient Egyptians during the New Kingdom and after, c.1500-600 BC. Students will learn about politics, religion and the rule of the Pharaohs in Egypt at this time, and also about the wider history of the ancient world as revealed through Egypt’s interaction with other nations.

William Manley BA PhD
18076 £115.00
  
 Level  
14.00-16.00 Thursday 15 January 2015
(11 meetings) Campus

House of Eagles, Nest of Vipers: Alexandria and the Ptolemaic Dynasty

Day/half-day Event Ancient Alexandria, established by Alexander the Great as the focus for his new Empire, became a cultural melting pot. Its turbulent political history dominates the Mediterranean world for 300 years, culminating in the reign of Cleopatra VII and the clash with Rome. Through texts, archaeology and art, we will encounter the luxurious royal court, the vibrant philosophical environment and the interplay of a multi-cultural mix unequalled in the ancient world.

Penelope Wilson BA PhD
18083 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 14 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

Coptic: language and lives, level 2

For those with an elementary background in the Coptic language, this course will develop existing skills for reading Sahidic Coptic texts of various kinds, including letters, gospels, sayings of the desert fathers, and martyrdom stories. Prerequisites: Coptic, level 1.

William Manley BA PhD
18243 £460.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Thursday 25 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus

The Evil one of Akhetaten: the life and legacy of Egypts heretic king

Heretic, monotheist, pacifist, visionary, madman… Scholarly debate rages over what to call Egypt’s infamous reformer-king Akhenaten who turned Egypt upside down within his short reign. This short online course explores in detail the politics, religion, art and literature of the so-called Amarna revolution and goes in search of the man behind the myth.

Angela McDonald MA MPhil DPhil
18383 £54.00
- Monday 13 October 2014
(4 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Later Antiquity and the Medieval World

Not seen and not heard? Medieval women

Women, often sidelined in the grand historical narratives, take central stage in this short course. Focusing on the evolution of women's place in history from the Roman world to the Crusades, we explore the roles that women could and did play, and try to explain their proper place in history.

Lindsay H Thomson MA MLitt
17578 £66.00
13.00-15.00 Monday 06 October 2014
(6 meetings) Campus

Francis of Assisi - man and myth

Francis of Assisi has crossed boundaries in many ways - one of the only saints to be universally recognised by Protestants and Catholics and even acknowledged in some Muslim circles - but what was he really like? Is it the man or the image that endures? With a contentious and controversial 'spin-doctoring' of his way of life after his death, leading to offshoots of heresy and a disregard of his own wishes, this course will look at how a holy man lived and how his legacy was used by the Church.

Lindsay H Thomson MA MLitt
17499 £88.00
  
13.00-15.00 Thursday 22 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus

Dangerous liaisons? Byzantium and the West

How did the the Byzantine Empire survive for so long against the odds? Focusing on Byzantine relations with the "barbarian" kingdoms of the West and the Slav peoples of the Balkans and what is now Russia, we investigate the Byzantine world-view, the emergence its rival empires, the impact of the Crusades and the final catastrophic conquest of Constantinople and its aftermath.

Patrick J F Parsons MA PGCE
16337 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Monday 06 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Coming to the fore? Later Medieval women

From prophetic saints to power-hungry and ambitious queens, this course will look at the expanding roles for women in the later medieval world. Focusing on important and influential women, such as Joan of Arc and Elizabeth Tudor, we will consider whether these women were aberrations or extreme examples of an ongoing trend.

Lindsay H Thomson MA MLitt
18063 £66.00
10.00-12.00 Thursday 05 February 2015
(6 meetings) Campus

Medieval worlds - discovering the Middle Ages

Modern popular culture often presents the Middle Ages as superstitious, primitive and overwhelmingly violent and irrational. Using a wealth of written, artistic and archaeological sources we explore a complex world of piety and power, loyalty and treachery, atrocity and sancity. Studying the lives of the powerful and the powerless - those who fought, prayed and laboured - we challenge our perception of Medieval Europe.

Patrick J F Parsons MA PGCE
18068 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Tuesday 19 May 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Early medieval invasions and migrations in Scotland

Day/half-day Event The centuries following the fall of the Roman empire saw mass migrations and bloody invasions across western Europe. In Scotland these ranged from the movement of Scots from the west, Anglo-Saxons from the south, and Vikings from the north, as well as Christian missionaries from Ireland and the continent. But how much do we actually know about these movements? Using archaeology, recent research has questioned these ideas. This day course introduces you to the evidence firsthand so you can judge for yourself.

Oliver O'Grady MA MPhil PhD FSA Scot
18193 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 15 November 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Medieval medicine - medicine, but not as we know it!

Following on from a very successful day class, this course will examine the theories and ideas behind medieval medicine. It will also include classes on women, folklore, leprosy and the Black Death as examples of 'medieval diseases'. Come along and learn just how different, or otherwise, medicine was in the period between AD 500 and 1500.

Anne Paton MA MSc
18423 £88.00
  
19.00-21.00 Monday 26 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

The Greek and Roman World

Hairstyles of the rich and famous - a beginner's guide to ancient coinage

Day/half-day Event Ancient coins preserve some remarkable portraits. The images of the gods and deities of the earliest Greek coins are replaced by human portrayals following the death of Alexander the Great. Hellenistic rulers portrayed themselves on their coins, and Roman emperors followed this example. Our overview of ancient coinage examines iconography as well as trade, geopolitics, archaeology, art and ancient history.

Sally-Anne Coupar PhD MA PGCAP
16357 £15.00
10.00-12.00 Saturday 18 October 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

The art of two worlds: Ancient Rome and Ancient Egypt

Day/half-day Event When Egypt became part of the Roman Empire, two art-worlds collided. But how similar were the artistic traditions of Rome and Egypt? And how much did Egypt influence its captor? Combining two specialist perspectives, and using contrasting case studies from the lived and funerary realms, we will explore the cultures of Rome and Egypt through the mirror of their art.

Angela McDonald MA MPhil Dphil Sarah Graham MA Mlitt
16536 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 08 November 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Introduction to Latin

This course is designed for total beginners in Latin and will introduce the main features of the Latin language over the session. An ability to read and understand Latin is the principal aim, but an understanding of the grammar and structure will be an important adjunct. The course book is GDA Sharpley, Teach Yourself Beginner’s Latin (3rd edition 2003) and additional material will be provided where appropriate.

Fraser Dallachy MA MPhil PhD
16377 £230.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 23 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus

Thinking Roman

This course provides a comprehensive overview of Roman history from the Republic to the Empire, including aspects that are often undervalued such as the place of women and family, as well as attitudes to slavery and children.

Lindsay H Thomson MA Mlitt Patrick J F Parsons MA PGCE
17597 £230.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Monday 22 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Classical Greek civilisation 1A

A comprehensive introduction to the Classical Greek world, divided into two courses which can be studied over two successive years. It provides a solid foundation for the study of the subject at a higher level and also offers the opportunity for useful background study for those whose principal area of study will lie elsewhere, since history, literature, art and philosophy are all discussed. In all these areas, the contribution of Greece to the development of later western culture has been immense. This course is a self-contained unit on the history, literature and art of fifth century BC Athens.

Marie Martin MA PhD
17556 £230.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Monday 22 September 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Scottish brochs and the Roman Empire

Scottish brochs are small but massive drystone towers often containing undisturbed evidence of both local events, and those happening further away. A few brochs, particularly in the south, witnessed the three Roman invasions of Scotland and their archaeology provides a unique insight into the nature of the impact of the Roman Imperial Army on local Iron Age tribesmen. Focusing particularly on Dun Ardtreck on Skye and Leckie in Stirlingshire we will explore the impact Roman influence had on native culture.

Euan MacKie MA PhD
17039 £44.00
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 17 February 2015
(4 meetings) Campus

Roman foundation myths

Day/half-day Event From Aeneas escaping the burning city of Troy to Romulus murdering his twin brother, Remus, Roman foundation myths are full of excitement, intrigue and divine intervention. By looking at a variety of texts and images depicting conflicting stories of Rome’s rise to greatness, we will explore the importance of foundation myths in forging a Roman sense of identity and self.

Sarah Graham MA MLitt
16977 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 09 May 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Art

Art Psychotherapy

Introduction to art psychotherapy

Art therapy (now known as art psychotherapy) is a psychological therapy that uses art materials for self-expression and reflection in the presence of a trained art psychotherapist. It is a psychological treatment that helps someone to express and explore thoughts and feelings that they might otherwise struggle to put into words. It is another way of understanding and processing emotional problems. Our course will aim to offer you direct experience of using creativity and art-making for greater awareness of the role and function of an art psychotherapist; to provide a firm foundation for the possible progression onto a postgraduate MSc in art psychotherapy. It does not offer professional qualifications to practise art psychotherapy nor does it provide personal therapy. A key part of our course is to give you a "hands on" experience by making art work in a group setting, engaging in a range of creative workshops and learning through case presentations and group discussions. Please note there is a cost of £25 for course materials included in the fee. Prerequisites: Students will be selected following a pre-course interview process.

Tracy MacMillan BA MPhil PGDipAT SRAsT (Art) Simon Marshall BSc PGDip MSc
16710 £485.00
  
 Level  
18.15-20.45 Thursday 25 September 2014
(24 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Introduction to art psychotherapy

Art therapy (now known as art psychotherapy) is a psychological therapy that uses art materials for self-expression and reflection in the presence of a trained art psychotherapist. It is a psychological treatment that helps someone to express and explore thoughts and feelings that they might otherwise struggle to put into words. It is another way of understanding and processing emotional problems. Our course will aim to offer you direct experience of using creativity and art-making for greater awareness of the role and function of an art psychotherapist; to provide a firm foundation for the possible progression onto a postgraduate MSc in art psychotherapy. It does not offer professional qualifications to practise art psychotherapy nor does it provide personal therapy. A key part of our course is to give you a 'hands on' experience by making art work in a group setting, engaging in a range of creative workshops and learning through case presentations and group discussions. Please note there is a cost of £25 for course materials included in the fee. Prerequisites: Students will be selected following a pre-course interview process.

Tracy MacMillan BA MPhil PGDipAT SRAsT (Art)
16709 £485.00
  
 Level  
13.00-15.30 Monday 22 September 2014
(24 meetings) Campus
Further Info

History of art

From Courtiers to Colourists: Scottish painting from 1470 to 1920

An introduction to the fascinating developments in Scottish painting from the late fifteenth century to the early twentieth century with particular reference to outstanding examples from national and public collections in Edinburgh and Glasgow. Artists featured will include Ramsay, Raeburn, Wilkie, Walton, Pettie and Peploe.

Ailsa Turner BA PGCE
17513 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 16/ April 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

The work and legacy of the Glasgow Girls at the Glasgow School of Art

Day/half-day Event This course provide a fabulous opportunity to go behind the scenes at Glasgow School of Art to discover works created by the Glasgow Girls and their later followers while they were students. You will have the chance to view and discuss ceramics and textiles in the GSA Archives as well as examples of graphic design in the Mackintosh Library.

Rachael Grew MA MPhil PhD
16598 £20.00
10.00-13.15 Monday 11 May 2015
(1 meeting) Glasgow School of Art
Further Info

Art of the Italian Renaissance

This course provides a broad overview of the main strands of Italian art between c. 1400 and 1527. Focusing on the cities of Florence, Rome and Venice, the series of lectures will account for the development of art in these centres within the wider context of Italian politics, society and culture. Among the many themes highlighted are the role of patronage, the function of works of art and buildings, the techniques and materials used, and Humanism and the revival of the classical tradition. The course as a whole offers an introduction to the discipline of Art History and provides a solid foundation for further study in the field.

Ailsa Turner BA PGCE Helen Sutherland MA PhD PGCHE
17543 £230.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Wednesday 24 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Hunterian Art Gallery collections

This course will provide an introduction to the collection of art found within the University of Glasgow's Hunterian Art Gallery. The course will be split between lectures and gallery visits. Each lecture will provide an introduction to an aspect of the collection covering the artist's biography and key works with visits to the gallery looking at works by them in the collection.

Blair Cunningham BA MFA
16379 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus

Impressionism 1860-1900

Impressionism is perhaps one of the most famous movements in art history, but how exactly do we define Impressionism? How did it begin? What was it responding to? How did it develop? Why did it end? This course will explore all these question and more through examining a wide variety of late nineteenth-century French artists and works.

Rachael Grew MA MPhil PhD
16605 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

A guided tour of the National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh

Day/half-day Event An opportunity to have a close look at some outstanding examples of European painting from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries in the National Collection. The day will be divided into three discussion sessions in front of the paintings. Please meet at the information desk in the Weston Link, entrance from Princes Street Gardens.

Ailsa Turner BA PGCE
17545 £30.00
11.00-15.30 Saturday 21 March 2015
(1 meeting) National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh
Further Info

Art in Glasgow - art education, art institutions and the art trade

Day/half-day Event For over 250 years Glasgow has been an important centre for training artists, exhibiting Old Masters and modern art and selling pictures and prints, by art dealers and auction houses. This day event examines the achievements of some of the institutions and individuals including the Foulis Academy, Glasgow School of Art, Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts and Glasgow Art Union; artists and teachers James Denholm and John Knox; and firms founded by Alexander Finlay and Robert McTear.

George Fairfull-Smith MA
16661 £30.00
10.00-15.30 Saturday 28 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

An artistic pot-pourri

This is a wide-ranging series of lectures, thematically approached. A different subject will be examined at each meeting and will include: the development of portraiture, of landscape, the classical myths, the classic Italian cities - Florence, Venice, Rome, Van Gogh, towards Abstraction, etc.

Ian Macdonald DA BA
17209 £88.00
  
13.30-15.30 Thursday 15 January 2015
(8 meetings) Pollockshields Burgh Hall, 70 Glencairn Drive
Further Info

An exploration of Medieval Art

This course explores the characteristics of art between the eleventh and the fifteenth century. It will discuss the development of architecture from Romanesque to Gothic; of sculpture and its emancipation from architectural decoration; of painting as it moved from miniature work to fresco and panel painting. The social, political and religious forces that contributed to these changes will be used to contexualise a discourse on this fascinating and culturally complex period.

Elisabetta Toreno Dott.ssa
17510 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Great artists

This course provides an introduction to the work of eight great masters and their contribution to the development of European painting . Each meeting will be devoted to an individual artist, placing his work and achievements within the context of his life and times. Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Picasso, Constable and Turner are among the artists featured.

Maureen Park MA AMA PhD
17552 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Tuesday 14 October 2014
(8 meetings) Orchardhill Parish Church, Church Road, Giffnock
Further Info

Paintings in Glasgow

If you have ever wandered round galleries unsure of what you should be seeing in paintings, then this is the course for you. It provides an introduction to art history through conducted tours of Glasgow's magnificent painting collections in Kelvingrove Art Gallery, the Hunterian Art Gallery and the Burrell Collection.

Maureen Park MA AMA PhD
17636 £88.00
  
10.15-12.30 Tuesday 20 January 2015
(7 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Great artists

This course provides an introduction to the work of eight great masters and their contribution to the development of European painting . Each meeting will be devoted to an individual artist, placing his work and achievements within the context of his life and times. Leonardo da Vinci, Monet, Picasso, Constable and Turner are among the artists featured.

Maureen Park MA AMA PhD
17553 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Monday 13 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Great artists

This course provides an introduction to the work of eight great masters and their contribution to the development of European painting . Each meeting will be devoted to an individual artist, placing his work and achievements within the context of his life and times. Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Picasso, Constable and Turner are among the artists featured.

Maureen Park MA AMA PhD
17554 £88.00
  
13.15-15.15 Tuesday 14 October 2014
(8 meetings) Orchardhill Parish Church, Church Road, Giffnock
Further Info

Paintings in Glasgow 2

This new course is designed to develop your appreciation of Glasgow's magnificent art collections in Kelvingrove Art Gallery, the Hunterian Art Gallery and the Burrell Collection. The course will take the form of conducted tours and group discussions in front of the paintings. You do not need to have done Paintings in Glasgow 1 to enrol on this course but a basic knowledge of art history would be helful.

Maureen Park MA AMA PhD
17557 £88.00
  
10.15-12.30 Thursday 22 January 2015
(7 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Secret, black, and midnight hags: witches in art and history

The witch is a key cultural icon, featuring in paintings, plays, and a plethora of other media. But where exactly did the idea of the "wicked" witch come from? Using art works from the 15th to 20th centuries, this course will explore the witch from multiple points of view: from historical case studies to Elizabethan drama, to 20th-century revivals. It will also include a visit to the Special Collections department at Glasgow University Library to look at a range of original printed material on the witch.

Rachael Grew MA MPhil PhD
17049 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(8 meetings. Please note: no meeting on 12 November) Campus
Further Info

Dutch 17th Century Painting

The 17th century is regarded as the golden age of Dutch painting. The Dutch succeeded in establishing a Republic, independent of Hapsburg rule. Its economy boomed and the art market flourished. New categories of painting developed, celebrating Dutch pride and achievement and reflecting the ideas and concerns of contemporary society. The artists who produced them were as varied in styles as the subjects they painted. This course will assess the remarkable and influential contribution to European painting made by masters such as Rembrandt, Hals, Vermeer, Ruisdael and others, in the historical context of the new Dutch Republic

Ailsa Turner BA PGCE
17606 £115.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 15 January 2015
(10 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Symbolism

Symbolism was a major movement within the arts, spanning from the 1860s to the 1910s. It was practiced across Europe from Scotland to Russia, and found expression in a wide range of media, from art to music, literature to theatre. Yet today the history of art barely mentions it: how could something so big be forgotten? This course will introduce you to some of the key members of the Symbolist art circle, and discuss their work in relation to important social and artistic themes.

Rachael Grew MA MPhil PhD
16800 £88.00
  
10.30-12.30 Monday 19 January 2015
(8 meetings) Off-Campus
Further Info

The art of the 20th century

The art of the twentieth century can be both exhilarating and daunting. Often people feel that they would like to know more about it but are afraid that they will not be able to understand it or that they will be confused by all the different "isms" of twentieth century movements. This course is all about demystifying modern and contemporary art. It provides a general overview of some of the major movements, artists and ideas of twentieth century art and also introduces students to some of the important debates and controversies which surround the variety of art from the last century.

Blair Cunningham BA MFA
16340 £230.00
  
 Level  
13.00-15.00 Wednesday 24 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus

An A-Z kaleidoscope of painters

A series of Western paintings will be covered using the letters of the alphabet to select a wide number of artists of various periods since classical antiquity to recent times.  The works will be set in context, analysed and discussed with the class for interpretation and personal responses.

Christine Linnell MA PhD
16835 £88.00
  
13.00-15.00 Friday 10 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

20th century Scottish art

Art has changed enormously in the past one hundred years and Scotland has increasingly played an important part in the development of modern and contemporary art. This course is intended to be a guide to the bewildering array of movements and artists found in this and the last century, starting in the late 1890s and finishing in the present day.

Blair Cunningham BA MFA
16344 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 22 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus

Rubens and his Legacy

Helen Sutherland
22247 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 14 March 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

The depiction of women in art

Have you ever noticed how most women depicted in art are nudes and temptresses, wives and lovers? This course explores the portrayal of a variety of female figures in art by both male and female artists, comparing and contrasting their approaches to such figures as the Madonna, Venus, and the Monster, among many others.

Rachael Grew MA MPhil PhD
16836 £88.00
  
10.30-12.30 Monday 13 October 2014
(8 meetings. Please note: no meeting on 10 November) Kilmardinny House Arts Centre, Bearsden
Further Info

A tour of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh

Day/half-day Event An opportunity to explore developments in portrait painting in Scotland from the sixteenth to the twenty first centuries in the splendid refurbished Scottish National Portrait Gallery. The day will be divided into three discussion sessions in front of the paintings. Please meet in the main entrance hall.

Ailsa Turner BA PGCE
17561 £30.00
11.00-15.30 Saturday 08 November 2014
(1 meeting) Off-Campus
Further Info

Frances Macdonald: life and work

Day/half-day Event This one-off event will enable you to take a detailed look at the work of one of the least-known members of the Glasgow Four: Frances Macdonald. Using the collections at Kelvingrove and the Hunterian Art Gallery (including a trip behind the scenes to the print room), we will view original pieces of Macdonald’s art, including furniture, book illustrations, and her mysterious final watercolours.

Rachael Grew MA MPhil PhD
17240 £30.00
10.00-16.30 Wednesday 06 May 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

An artistic pot-pourri

This is a wide-ranging series of lectures, thematically approached. A different subject will be examined at each meeting and will include: the development of portraiture, of landscape, the classical myths, the classic Italian cities - Florence, Venice, Rome, Van Gogh, towards Abstraction, etc.

Ian Macdonald DA BA
17207 £88.00
  
13.30-15.30 Tuesday 13 January 2015
(8 meetings) Wellington Church, 77 Southpark Avenue
Further Info

An artistic pot-pourri

This is a wide-ranging series of lectures, thematically approached. A different subject will be examined at each meeting and will include: the development of portraiture, of landscape, the classical myths, the classic Italian cities - Florence, Venice, Rome, Van Gogh, towards Abstraction, etc.

Ian Macdonald DA BA
17206 £88.00
  
10.30-12.30 Tuesday 13 January 2015
(8 meetings) Wellington Church, 77 Southpark Avenue
Further Info

An artistic pot-pourri

This is a wide-ranging series of lectures, thematically approached. A different subject will be examined at each meeting and will include: the development of portraiture, of landscape, the classical myths, the classic Italian cities - Florence, Venice, Rome, Van Gogh, towards Abstraction, etc.

Ian Macdonald DA BA
17208 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 15 January 2015
(8 meetings) Pollockshields Burgh Hall, 70 Glencairn Drive
Further Info

Impressionism and beyond

This course will explore the developments that flowed from the stylistic and technical investigations of that group of painters labelled Impressionists who opened the flood gates to a succession of new ideas and theories that enriched the art of painting in Europe in the second half of the 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century.

Ian Macdonald DA BA
17109 £100.00
  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(9 meetings) Pollockshields Burgh Hall, 70 Glencairn Drive
Further Info

Impressionism and beyond

This course will explore the developments that flowed from the stylistic and technical investigations of that group of painters labelled Impressionists who opened the flood gates to a succession of new ideas and theories that enriched the art of painting in Europe in the second half of the 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century.

Ian Macdonald DA BA
17107 £100.00
  
10.30-12.30 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(9 meetings) Wellington Church, 77 Southpark Avenue
Further Info

Impressionism and beyond

This course will explore the developments that flowed from the stylistic and technical investigations of that group of painters labelled Impressionists who opened the flood gates to a succession of new ideas and theories that enriched the art of painting in Europe in the second half of the 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century.

Ian Macdonald DA BA
17108 £100.00
  
13.30-15.30 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(9 meetings) Wellington Church, 77 Southpark Avenue
Further Info

The art collectors and patrons of Glasgow

Glasgow's cultural history includes many distinguished men and women who supported the fine arts in Glasgow in the 18th and 19th centuries. This course looks at key figures who bought Old Master paintings and commissioned modern art, including Robert Foulis, Archibald McLellan, Alexander 'Picture' Gordon, James Smith of Jordanhill, Mrs Cecilia Douglas of Orbiston, John Bell of North Park, and Alexander Bannantyne Stewart, whose mansion in Langisde included a specially designed picture gallery.

George Fairfull-Smith MA
16611 £33.00
10.00-12.00 Wednesday 22 April 2015
(3 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Impressionism and beyond

This course will explore the developments that flowed from the stylistic and technical investigations of that group of painters labelled Impressionists who opened the flood gates to a succession of new ideas and theories that enriched the art of painting in Europe in the second half of the 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century.

Ian Macdonald DA BA
17110 £100.00
  
13.30-15.30 Thursday 09 October 2014
(9 meetings) Pollockshields Burgh Hall, 70 Glencairn Drive
Further Info

The Scots in Paris

Day/half-day Event In the second half of the 19th through to the first few decades of the 20th century Paris was the place to be. From Realism to Surrealism and from Courbet to Léger, Paris was a place of innovation. The city provided many Scottish artists with inspiration and for some a home. Artists such as Fergusson, Paolozzi and Gear all spent time in Paris and we will look at many more.

Blair Cunningham BA MFA
16368 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Thursday 14 May 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

Leonardo da Vinci and his followers

Day/half-day Event This one-day event examines the career of Leonardo, his artistic and scientific interests and the long-lasting legacy of his art. His works will be illustrated individually and in comparisons with those of his contemporaries. Leonardo left vast written and drawn material, which will also be used to illustrate some of the driving forces of his art. Finally, the impact of his artistic style will be examined by looking at art by his direct followers and in the artistic culture after his death in 1519.

Elisabetta Toreno Dott.ssa
18057 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 21 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

18th century British painting

Day/half-day Event What is Britishness? What does it look like? In the 18th century artists identified themselves as British in a new way which was reinforced by the establishment of the Royal Academy in 1768. We will explore this Britishness through close scrutiny of paintings by artists such as William Hogarth, Thomas Gainsborough, Joshua Reynolds, as well as by some landscapists.

Helen Sutherland MA PhD PGCHE Ailsa Turner BA PGCE
18058 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 25 April 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Rembrandt: The Finest Years

Day/half-day Event During a fifty-year career, Rembrandt's style grew steadily more personal and expressive. We will explore his late works, the subject of the 'Rembrandt: The Finest Years' exhibition at the National Gallery in London, for evidence of the technical innovation and original interpretation of traditional subjects which made him one of the greatest artists of all time.

Helen Sutherland MA PhD PGCHE
18064 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 6 December 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Beautiful Glasgow

Day/half-day Event In collaboration with French Ignition.See Glasgow like you've never seen it before. Professional French photographer Jean-Marc Millière will be sharing his vision of Glasgow through his photographs. Discover some of Glasgow's landmarks with Jean-Marc's fresh pair of eyes and attention to detail. This event will be conducted in French but is open to a anyone with some knowledge of French. There will be native speakers on hand to assist with understanding.

Jean-Marc Millière
18430 £15.00
17.30-20.00 Wednesday 04 March 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

Ingenious Impressions: behind the scenes at The Hunterian and Special Collections' exhibition

Day/half-day Event Each book has its own fascinating story to tell. The exhibition "Ingenious Impressions" explores the development and subsequent afterlives of the earliest printed books - the "incunabula" of the 15th century. Led by experts from Special Collections, this day event provides an introduction to, and tour of, the exhibition and will include behind-the-scenes opportunities to explore these remarkable Renaissance artefacts in more depth.

Julie Gardham MA MA Phil Robert MacLean BSc MSc
18475
10.15-15.30 Saturday 09 May 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Photography

Introduction to digital photography

Have a digital camera? Don't know what all the buttons do? Then come and find out! Learn how to take wonderful pictures with your camera and how to make them even better using the latest image manipulation software. You will be inspired by a number of practical sessions guiding you through different elements of photography. By the end of the course you should have a wide range of images to be proud of. Students must have their own digital camera and know how to use a computer.

Neil Miller
17661 £108.00
  
 Level  
17.30-19.30 Monday 06 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Introduction to digital photography

Have a digital camera? Don't know what all the buttons do? Then come and find out! Learn how to take wonderful pictures with your camera and how to make them even better using the latest image manipulation software. You will be inspired by a number of practical sessions guiding you through different elements of photography. By the end of the course you should have a wide range of images to be proud of. Students must have their own digital camera and know how to use a computer.

Neil Miller
17662 £108.00
  
 Level  
17.30-19.30 Monday 19 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

How to get the best out of your digital camera

Shooting in Automatic for 99% of the time? Here’s a course to enable students to develop their photography and move on to the next level. Really take control of your camera, and get the shots you’ve been looking for! Learn how to take effective shots and make them even better using image editing software. You will be inspired by both practical and theoretical sessions, and by the end of the course you will have built a portfolio of images to be proud of. Students must own a camera and be conversant with the basic operation of their camera.

Roger Harman
17058 £162.00
  
13.00-16.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

How to get the best out of your digital camera

Shooting in Automatic for 99% of the time? Here’s a course to enable students to develop their photography and move on to the next level. Really take control of your camera, and get the shots you’ve been looking for! Learn how to take effective shots and make them even better using image editing software. You will be inspired by both practical and theoretical sessions, and by the end of the course you will have built a portfolio of images to be proud of. Students must own a camera and be conversant with the basic operation of their camera.

Roger Harman
17057 £162.00
  
13.00-16.00 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Practical Art

Creative drawing and painting 3

This course provides a creative approach to drawing and painting suitable for both beginners and students with some experience. Learn about different materials and painting techniques including acrylics and oils, gouache and watercolour. Materials are not provided. New students are very welcome.

Irene Macneil BA DipAD
16875 £81.00
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 15 April 2015
(6 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Creative drawing and painting 1

This course provides a creative approach to drawing and painting suitable for both beginners and students with some previous experience. Learn about different materials and painting techniques including acrylics and oils, gouache and watercolour. Materials are not provided.

Irene Macneil BA DipAD
16733 £108.00
  
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Botanical painting and illustration 1

This course is suitable for beginners and intermediate students. We will explore the art of painting and drawing flowers, plants, fruit and vegetables, examining both traditional and contemporary styles. Starting with a visual presentation to inspire, you will develop your own working practice and make your own botanical book. Materials are not included.

Clare Crines MA BA
16436 £162.00
  
09.30-12.30 Monday 20 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Drawing in Glasgow museums 2

In pre-arranged meetings via email, in Glasgow's public museums and art galleries, we will learn on-the-spot drawing techniques, from objects in collections, interiors and architecture, working mostly in charcoal and pencil. A practical demonstration and brief discussion will be followed by individual tuition.

Steve McQueen BA
17493 £135.00
  
10.00-12.30 Thursday 22 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Absolute beginners: an introduction to painting techniques

This course introduces the student to various water-based painting techniques in translucent and opaque media in simple exercises. The student will learn the differences between watercolour, gouache and acrylic paint, how to use various methods of application and how to gain textural effects in their work. This course will include an introduction to colour mixing. Themes such as landscape, still life and abstract will be considered. Materials are not provided.

Maggie Ramage DA
17646 £162.00
  
10.00-13.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Absolute beginners: an introduction to portrait drawing

This course introduces the absolute beginner to accurate drawing of the human head. The student will learn about proportion and perspective, line, tone, texture and colour and how to use various drawing techniques and media. In a series of simple lessons and demonstrations the students will learn how to draw the human head from various angles. A fee will be charged for the model. Materials are not provided.

Maggie Ramage DA
17645 £202.00
  
10.00-16.00 Mon 15th June to Fri 19th June 2015
(5 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Fine art - drawing and painting 3

This course is designed to develop the drawing and painting skills you have already learned. You will be encouraged to try personal projects and learn how to plan for your final artwork as artists do. Possible themes include still life, landscape, portrait, figure, abstract, mixed media. A small fee will be charged for model if required. New students are welcome.

Maggie Ramage DA
17534 £122.00
  
10.00-13.00 Thursday 19 March 2015
(6 meetings) Netherlee Pavillion, Linn Park Avenue, Netherlee
Further Info

Fine art - drawing and painting 2

This course is designed to develop students' drawing and painting skills and to teach them drawing and painting techniques, using a variety of media. They will learn to see how an artist sees, draw and paint in various styles and learn how artists plan paintings. Possible themes include still life, landscapes, portraits, figures, mixed media and abstract. A small fee will be charged if model is required. Materials are not provided. New students welcome.

Maggie Ramage DA
17535 £162.00
  
10.00-13.00 Thursday 22 January 2015
(8 meetings) Netherlee Pavillion, Linn Park Avenue, Netherlee
Further Info

Botanical painting and illustration 3

This course is suitable for beginners and intermediate students. We will explore the art of painting and drawing flowers, plants, fruit and vegetables, examining both traditional and contemporary styles. Starting with a visual presentation to inspire, you will develop your own working practice and make your own botanical book. Materials are not included. New students are very welcome. Please note there will be no meetings held on 4 May and 25 May.

Clare Crines MA BA
16422 £122.00
  
09.30-12.30 Monday 20 April 2015
(6 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Botanical painting and illustration 2

This course is suitable for beginners and intermediate students. We will explore the art of painting and drawing flowers, plants, fruit and vegetables, examining both traditional and contemporary styles. Starting with a visual presentation to inspire, you will develop your own working practice and make your own botanical book. Materials are not included. New students are very welcome.

Clare Crines MA BA
16390 £162.00
  
09.30-12.30 Monday 19 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Painting – watercolours and acrylics

This course is suitable for beginners and those who want to follow a structured course in water based media. Exercises of varying difficulty will be followed covering the various elements of picture making, i.e. composition, colour, tone, texture, pattern etc. Subjects will include still life objects, portraiture and landscape themes. Bring your chosen medium to first class. No materials will be provided.

Julia Gurney BA MA
17250 £108.00
  
19.00-21.00 Monday 19 January 2015
(8 meetings) Bearsden Academy, Stockiemuir Road
Further Info

Absolute beginners: learn to draw in a week

This course introduces the absolute beginner to 'seeing' and drawing accurately. The student will learn how to use a variety of drawing techniques and drawing media and how to use line, tone, texture and colour in a drawing, presented in a series of simple lessons and demonstrations. The course will consider themes such as portraiture and still life in a variety of styles. Materials are not provided.

Maggie Ramage DA
17676 £202.00
  
10.00-16.00 Mon 8th June - Fri 12 June 2015
(5 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Absolute beginners: an introduction to drawing techniques

This course introduces the absolute beginner to 'seeing' and drawing accurately. The student will learn how to use a variety of drawing techniques and drawing media and how to use line, tone, texture and colour in a drawing, presented in a series of simple lessons and demonstrations. The course will consider themes such as portraiture and still life in a variety of styles. Materials are not provided.

Maggie Ramage DA
17678 £162.00
  
10.00-13.00 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Creative drawing and painting 2

This course provides a creative approach to drawing and painting suitable for both beginners and students with some previous experience. Learn about different materials and painting techniques including acrylics and oils, gouache and watercolour. Materials are not provided. New students are very welcome.

Irene Macneil BA DipAD
17213 £108.00
  
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Stained glass 2

This creative craft course is designed for both beginners, who will learn copper foiling techniques, and students with previous glass cutting experience who wish to develop their foiling technique or progress to leaded work. Students are required to purchase their own materials, the approximate cost of which, for one session, is £75. Nothing should be purchased before discussion with the course tutor on the first day of class. New students are very welcome.

Julie Smith
17498 £140.00
  
13.00-15.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus

Watercolours

This is a structured course aimed at beginners and returners. Basic techniques and approaches will be explored through exercises of varying difficulty and demonstrations will help to make this medium less off-putting. The elements of picture making will be covered: composition, focal point, texture, pattern, together with the use of the colour wheel, mixing and the expressive use of the brush. Watercolours should be brought to the first session.

Julia Gurney BA MA
17195 £108.00
  
19.00-21.00 Monday 20 October 2014
(8 meetings) Bearsden Academy, Stockiemuir Road
Further Info

Beginners plus: drawing and painting 1

This course is suitable for students who have completed the absolute beginners classes or who have basic drawing and painting skills. Lessons will be given in application of different types of paint and drawing materials. Students will learn the visual art process to plan for painting through drawing, development and research. Personal choices in materials to use for simple class projects (oil, acrylic, watercolour) will be made. Possible themes include still life, landscape, abstract figure/portrait (a small fee will be charged for model). Materials are not provided.

Maggie Ramage DA
17641 £162.00
  
13.00-16.00 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Fine art - drawing and painting 1

This course is designed to develop students' drawing and painting skills and to teach them techniques, using a variety of media. The student will learn to see how an artist sees, draw and paint in various styles and learn how artists plan paintings. Possible themes include still life, landscape, portrait, figure, mixed media and abstract. A small fee will be charged for model if required. Materials are not provided.

Maggie Ramage DA
17604 £162.00
  
10.00-13.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(8 meetings) Netherlee Pavillion, Linn Park Avenue, Netherlee
Further Info

Beginners plus: drawing and painting 2

This course is suitable for students who have completed the absolute beginners classes or who have basic drawing and painting skills. Lessons will be given in application of different types of drawing materials and paint (oils, acrylics etc.). Students will learn how to use the visual artist's working process to plan for a painting through drawing, development and research. Personal choices in materials for simple class projects will be made. Possible themes include still life, landscape abstract, portrait/figure (a small fee will be charged for model if required). Materials are not provided. New students welcome.

Maggie Ramage DA
17555 £162.00
  
13.00-16.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Drawing Glasgow

In pre-arranged meetings via email in public spaces (museums, botanic gardens, cafés etc.) we will learn on-the-spot drawing techniques from objects, interiors, architecture and people. Working mostly in charcoal and pencil, a practical demonstration and brief discussion will be followed by individual tuition.

Steve McQueen BA
17637 £102.00
  
10.00-12.30 Thursday 23 April 2015
(6 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Painting – watercolours and acrylics

This course is suitable for beginners and those who want to follow a structured course in water based media. Exercises of varying difficulty will be followed covering the various elements of picture making, i.e. composition, colour, tone, texture, pattern etc. Subjects will include still life objects, portraiture and landscape themes. Bring your chosen medium to first class. No materials will be provided.

Julia Gurney BA MA
17251 £108.00
  
13.00-15.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(8 meetings) Guide Hall, John Street, Helensburgh
Further Info

Drawing in Glasgow museums 1

In pre-arranged meetings via email, in Glasgow's public museums and art galleries, we will learn on-the-spot drawing techniques, from objects in collections, interiors and architecture, working mostly in charcoal and pencil. A practical demonstration and brief discussion will be followed by individual tuition.

Steve McQueen BA
17577 £135.00
  
10.00-12.30 Thursday 23 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Practical painting 2

This is a painting class for beginners or students interested in developing their own work, covering practical aspects of oil painting, acrylic, watercolour and gouache. Individual tuition and support will be offered. Materials are not provided. New students are welcome.

Irene Macneil BA DipAD
17077 £162.00
  
10.00-13.00 Saturday 24 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Practical painting 3

A painting class for beginners or students interested in developing their own work, covering practical aspects of oil painting, acrylic, watercolour and gouache. Individual tuition and support will be offered. Materials are not provided. New students are welcome.

Irene Macneil BA DipAD
17220 £122.00
  
10.00-13.00 Saturday 18 April 2015
(6 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Drawing and painting 2

This is a practical course suitable for beginners and more experienced students. It is designed to develop drawing and painting skills and provide students with a basic knowledge and understanding of some of the disciplines and techniques involved. Students will be taught at their own pace and individual tuition and support will be offered. Materials are not provided.

Ian Mackenzie BA
17075 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(8 meetings) McKechnie Institute, Girvan
Further Info

Watercolours in Spring

This course is aimed at beginners and returners who wish to try painting on location, weather permitting. A different theme will be introduced each week, i.e. Botanical Studies, Garden, Seascape, Woods, etc. Developing your own style and subject matter for returners will be encouraged. Watercolour paints should be brought to the first session.

Julia Gurney BA MA
17101 £108.00
  
13.00-15.00 Wednesday 15 April 2015
(8 meetings) Guide Hall, John Street, Helensburgh
Further Info

Practical painting 1

This is a course for beginners or students interested in developing their own work covering practical aspects of oil painting, acrylic, watercolour and gouache. Individual tuition and support will be offered. Materials are not provided.

Irene Macneil BA DipAD
16840 £162.00
  
10.00-13.00 Saturday 11 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Drawing and painting 1

This is a practical course suitable for beginners and more experienced students. It is designed to develop drawing and painting skills and provide students with a basic knowledge and understanding of some of the disciplines and techniques involved. Students will be taught at their own pace and individual tuition and support will be offered. Materials are not provided.

Ian Mackenzie BA
17053 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Wednesday 15 October 2014
(8 meetings) McKechnie Institute, Girvan
Further Info

Drawing and painting for beginners 3

This course is designed to develop your learned drawing and painting skills and techniques using a variety of media. You will be encouraged to try personal projects and learn how to plan for your final artwork as artists do. Possible themes include still life, landscape, portrait, figure, abstract, mixed media (a small fee will be charged for model, if required). New students welcome.

Maggie Ramage DA
17642 £122.00
  
10.00-13.00 Wednesday 18 March 2015
(6 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Watercolours

This is a structured course aimed at beginners and returners. Basic techniques and approaches will be explored through exercises of varying difficulty and demonstrations will help to make this medium less off-putting. The elements of picture making will be covered: composition, focal point, texture, pattern, together with the use of the colour wheel, mixing and the expressive use of the brush. Watercolours should be brought to the first session.

Julia Gurney BA MA
17196 £108.00
  
13.00-15.00 Wednesday 15 October 2014
(8 meetings) Guide Hall, John Street, Helensburgh
Further Info

Absolute beginners: an introduction to drawing techniques

This course introduces the absolute beginner to 'seeing' and drawing accurately. The student will learn how to use a variety of drawing techniques and drawing media and how to use line, tone, texture and colour in a drawing, presented in a series of simple lessons and demonstrations. The course will consider themes such as portraiture and still life in a variety of styles. Materials are not provided.

Maggie Ramage DA
18196 £108.00
  
13.00-15.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(8 meetings) Netherlee Pavillion, Linn Park Avenue, Netherlee
Further Info

Absolute beginners - introduction to painting techniques

This course introduces the student to various water-based painting techniques in translucent and opaque media in simple exercises. The student will learn the differences between watercolour, gouache and acrylic paint, how to use various methods of application and how to gain textural effects in their work. This course will include an introduction to colour mixing. Themes such as landscape, still life and abstract will be considered. Materials are not provided.

Maggie Ramage DA
18200 £108.00
  
13.00-15.00 Thursday 22 January 2015
(8 meetings) Netherlee Pavillion, Linn Park Avenue, Netherlee
Further Info

Absolute beginners: learn to paint in a week

This is an extensive course for students who have already attended "absolute beginners" drawing class or for students who have already learned basic drawing skills and would like to make paintings. Over the week you will learn how to mix colour and how to apply paint. You will learn the difference and how to paint in thick opaque paint and translucent paint and the various techniques and styles for each. Possible themes will include: still life, landscape, abstract and botanical studies. Materials are not provided.

Maggie Ramage DA
18363 £202.00
  
10.00-16.00 Mon 22 June - Fri 26 June 2015
(5 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Computing

Introduction to SQL in one day

Day/half-day Event SQL is an industry standard language used to access information held in almost every database system in the world. In just one day this practical crash course will introduce you to databases and teach you how to confidently write SQL to search and manipulate the data within them. Prerequisites: Students should be computer literate, in that they should be comfortable using a computer for general tasks. No previous programming experience is required.

Calum Alexander BSc MSc PhD
16408 £85.00
09.30-16.30 Saturday 11 October 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Introduction to Python programming

Python is an intuitive but powerful programming language. Even as a novice you can quickly build useful applications. Python is both a "procedural" and an "object-oriented" language, and you will learn about this and other features. Python is open source and fun to use. The course will be based on Python 2.7. Prerequisite: No previous programme experience is required, however, before starting the course, students should be confident with PC use and the internet.

Douglas Macdonald BSc MSc PhD
16567 £105.00
  
10.00-16.00 Saturday 25 October 2014
(3 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Introduction to Python programming

Python is an intuitive but powerful programming language. Even as a novice you can quickly build useful applications. Python is both a "procedural" and an "object-oriented" language, and you will learn about this and other features. Python is open source and fun to use. The course will be based on Python 2.7. Prerequisite: No previous programme experience is required, however, before starting the course, students should be confident with PC use and the internet.

Douglas Macdonald BSc MSc PhD
16568 £105.00
  
10.00-16.00 Saturday 07 February 2015
(3 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Learn to build, promote and analyse a basic website

Learn to create a basic website with no coding skills, what it takes to promote that site and understand what visitors are doing once they are on it. This journey will dispel myths, give you a very practical, interactive & real world project. You will learn the basic skills you need to get a simple business or hobby website on the internet and then use social media to promote it.

Alan Fair
16714 £55.00
19.00-21.00 Wednesday 22 October 2014
(5 meetings) Campus
Further Info

An Introduction to Business Data Report Writing

Day/half-day Event SQL along with tools such as Microsoft Report Builder are used to access and analyse information held in database system around the world. In just one day this practical crash course will introduce you to advanced aspects of SQL & teach you how to confidently write SQL for reports which group and summarise data for reporting and analysis.

Calum Alexander BSc MSc PhD
16376 £85.00
09.30-16.30 Saturday 21 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Business applications

Business Applications is ideal training and learning within an informal professional environment for those keen to develop an understanding of IT applications within contemporary organisations. Focusing on ICT, such as Microsoft Office, Social Media and the Internet, we introduce candidates to business functions, such as planning, accounts & finance, sales & marketing, management, customer service and communication, discovering best practice across multiple sectors.

Brian McEwan BA (Hons) Business & Information Management and Post Graduate Diploma Teaching Qualification in Further Education
17054 £110.00
  
18.00-20.00 Wednesday 01 October 2014
(10 meetings) Campus
Further Info

An introduction to business database report writing

Day/half-day Event SQL along with tools such as Microsoft Report Builder are used to access and analyse information held in database system around the world. In just one day this practical crash course will introduce you to advanced aspects of SQL & teach you how to confidently write SQL for reports which group and summarise data for reporting and analysis. Prerequisites: students should be computer literate, in that they should be comfortable in a computer for general tasks. No previous programming experience is required.

Calum Alexander BSc MSc PhD
16349 £85.00
09.30-16.30 Saturday 24 January 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Counselling Skills

Psychodrama: dipping your toe in the water

Day/half-day Event escribed by some as "a rehearsal for living", Psychodrama focuses on doing, thinking, feeling and reflecting. The active nature of this approach allows students to experience and explore its application therapeutically and educationally. Psychodrama sessions have three distinct and inter-dependent components: warm-up, enactment and sharing. This day event provides insight into the dynamic nature and application of Psychodrama.

Teresa Brown BA Dip.COT
16417 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 16 May 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

COSCA Counselling skills course

This COSCA validated course has also been accredited for CertHE credits by the University of Glasgow. The course provides an opportunity to develop and broaden your self-awareness as well as your listening and responding skills. You will be encouraged to develop an understanding of different theoretical counselling approaches as well as developing your own skills in a stimulating and supportive environment. The course is suitable for anyone using their skills in any helping role such as in health, education, social care, business or helpline work. More information and application forms can be found at www.gla.ac.uk/courses/openstudies/certificateincounsellingskills or contact Laureen Sykes; tel: 0141 330 1822 email: laureen.sykes@glasgow.ac.uk

Caterina O'Connor MA CQSW CASS DipCPS DipTP Richard Michael McCalmont BA BACP Counsellor
1003 £1,350.00
  
 Level  
18.00-21.00 Wednesdays from 24 September 2014
(29 Wed meetings and 6 Saturdays) Campus
Further Info

COSCA Introduction to group counselling skills course

The course is aimed at those who have already completed the Counselling Course Certificate (or equivalent). Participants' role as group leader will be developed. Primarily, it will assist participants to develop their knowledge and use of group counselling skills. The course is structured around themes and issues related to the life-span of a group, using the beginnings, middles and endings approach. It's a perfect course for people working with groups and also for those who wish to establish their skills in this environment.

Caterina O'Connor MA CQSW CASS DipCPS DipTP Richard Michael McCalmont BA BACP Counsellor
17508 £350.00
  
 Level  
18.00-21.00 Tuesday 27 January 2015
(12 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Counselling skills taster session

Do you find that people seem to turn to you for advice; do people say that you are a good listener and do you like to help others? On this taster session you will learn more about yourself and learn better ways to listen and respond to others. You will also get a better idea about whether you are ready to embark on a counselling skills training course with all that entails.

Caterina O'Connor MA CQSW CASS DipCPS DipTP
16599 £30.00
18.30-21.00 Tuesday 13 January 2015
(2 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Counselling skills taster session

Day/half-day Event Do you find that people seem to turn to you for advice; do people say that you are a good listener and do you like to help others? On this taster session you will learn more about yourself and learn better ways to listen and respond to others. You will also get a better idea about whether you are ready to embark on a counselling skills training course with all that entails.

Richard Michael McCalmont BA BACP Counsellor
16600 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Friday 17 April 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

COSCA Counselling Skills Course

This COSCA validated course has also been accredited for CertHE credits by the University of Glasgow. The course provides an opportunity to develop and broaden your self-awareness as well as your listening and responding skills. You will be encouraged to develop an understanding of different theoretical counselling approaches as well as developing your own skills in a stimulating and supportive environment. The course is suitable for anyone using their skills in any helping role such as in health, education, social care, business or helpline work. More information and application forms can be found at www.gla.ac.uk/courses/openstudies/certificateincounsellingskills or contact Laureen Sykes; tel: 0141 330 1822 email: laureen.sykes@glasgow.ac.uk

Caterina O'Connor MA CQSW CASS DipCPS DipTP Richard Michael McCalmont BA BACP Counsellor
10059 £1,350.00
  
 Level  
18.00-21.00 Thursdays from 15 January 2015 and 4 Saturdays
(32 evenings and 4 Saturdays full-days) Campus
Further Info

Counselling skills summer school

This week-long course provides entry-level students, with or without prior experience, the opportunity to work with accredited trainers to develop counselling skills. Listening and responding skills will be a major focus, as well as the enhancement of personal and professional development. This is an excellent preparatory course for the COSCA Certificate in counselling skills and allows students to gauge their suitability for a career in counselling.

Caterina O'Connor MA CQSW CASS DipCPS DipTP Richard Michael McCalmont BA BACP Counsellor
17638 £160.00
  
10.00-15.00 Mon 6th July - Fri 10 July 2015
(5 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Introduction to counselling listening skills

Change your life with more effective listening skills. Whether you simply wish to improve your communication at work and in personal relationships or you are considering pursuing a career in counselling, you will gain insights into key skills as well as the demands in seeking a professional qualification. Training is theoretical, experiential and interactive.

Colin Flynn
17046 £83.00
  
18.30-21.00 Monday 06 October 2014
(6 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Egan's Solution Focused Counselling

This course is open to people new to counselling and those with established experience. It introduces Egan’s 3-stage model which helps people solve problems and develop opportunities. The emphasis of this framework is on empowerment. The person’s own agenda is central, and the model seeks to move the person towards action leading to outcomes which they choose and value. This course is experiential and participants will have the opportunity to put what they are learning into practice

Colin Flynn
17494 £30.00
18.30-21.00 Monday 17 November 2014
(2 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Working with trauma

Trauma results when an event or incident overwhelms a person’s ability to cope or where it outweighs an individual’s personal resources: perhaps resulting in the experience of overwhelming emotion, fear of death and complete helplessness. Insight will be provided of working within the three stage model of recovery from trauma, an empowerment model used in many support organizations.

Isabelle Kerr
17219 £83.00
18.30-21.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(6 meetings) Campus
Further Info

COSCA Counselling Skills Course

This COSCA validated course has also been accredited for CertHE credits by the University of Glasgow. The course provides an opportunity to develop and broaden your self-awareness as well as your listening and responding skills. You will be encouraged to develop an understanding of different theoretical counselling approaches as well as developing your own skills in a stimulating and supportive environment. The course is suitable for anyone using their skills in any helping role such as in health, education, social care, business or helpline work. More information and application forms can be found at www.gla.ac.uk/courses/openstudies/certificateincounsellingskills or contact Laureen Sykes; tel: 0141 330 1822 email: laureen.sykes@glasgow.ac.uk

Caterina O'Connor MA CQSW CASS DipCPS DipTP Richard Michael McCalmont BA BACP Counsellor
1004 £1,350.00
  
 Level  
10.00-16.00 Friday 26 September 2014
(24 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Transactional analysis for Life

Day/half-day Event This short course outlines some of the basic concepts of Transactional Analysis to improve and understand your relationships with others and inner-self. Its role in the management of anxiety, stress and self-sustainment is explored. Students will gain an awareness of paterns of thinking, communication and behaviour to facilitate change.

Carole Wicks MSc CertEd PG Dip Int Psych
18318 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 07 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

History, International Affairs and Politics

Moray and Badenoch

Within the ancient province of Moray lie many important archaeological sites, carved stones and historic buildings. It is associated with key figures in Scottish history like Macbeth and the Wolf of Badenoch, and merits an in-depth study.

Irene Hughson MA FSAScot
18428 £88.00
10.00-12.00 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(8 meetings) Glen Hall, Neilston
Further Info

American

Native American worlds: from early contact to the Trail of Tears

This course introduces the world of Native American peoples from first contact on the eastern seaboard until forced removal and the Trail of Tears in the nineteenth century. With European colonisation came major challenges to the Indian way of life as both sides sought to accommodate new ideas of race, social class and sexual behaviour, but where some Indians sought compromise with colonisers, others resisted fiercely. Decades of warfare and enduring hostilities left their mark on indigenous landscapes. Domestic worlds, community, dress, familial responsibilities, hunting and social customs all underwent significant upheaval, and the new roles of men, women and children are explored thorugh this course, as they lived, loved and fought with Euro-American settlers.

Felicity Donohoe MA MLitt PhD
16355 £88.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 20 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

The American civil rights movement

We will consider the people, the events, the progress and the impact of the modern American civil rights movement. We will examine the origins of the movement, significant events including the Montgomery bus boycott, and the different ideas and strategies which characterised this tumultuous period. The significant role played by the often unheralded community activists who helped shape the movement will be examined in addition to the contribution of well-known leaders such as Dr Martin Luther King Jr. The course will be supported with film and primary source documents.

Robert Hamilton MA DipAdEd MPhil PhD
16924 £88.00
  
13.00-15.00 Tuesday 20 January 2015
(8 meetings) Clarkston Hall, Clarkston Road
Further Info

Black Nationalist groups and American civil rights

Day/half-day Event This 2-hour free evening event will examine black nationalist groups and their leaders, exploring the key differences in their approaches to achieving civil rights. From Marcus Garvey to Malcolm X and the Black Panthers, the event will study their responses to social prejudice and racial discrimination.The free event is offered as part of Black History Month.

Felicity Donohoe MA MLitt PhD
16385 £FREE
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 21 October 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Obama's final hurrah: the 2014 US Federal Election results

Day/half-day Event This one day event shall consider the results of the 2014 Federal Congressional Elections. It shall look at the winners and the losers, both individually, and from a wider partisan perspective. We shall examine the implications for the US, the Democratic and Republican parties, the Tea Party, and the ‘Legacy’ of President Obama, as he deals with the new Congress for the next two years.

Murray Leith BA MA PhD
16929 £30.00  Level  
10.00-16.00 Saturday 24 January 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

The American civil rights movement

We will consider the people, the events, the progress and the impact of the modern American civil rights movement. We will examine the origins of the movement, significant events including the Montgomery bus boycott, and the different ideas and strategies which characterised this tumultuous period. The significant role played by the often unheralded community activists who helped shape the movement will be examined in addition to the contribution of well-known leaders such as Dr Martin Luther King Jr. The course will be supported with film and primary source documents.

Robert Hamilton MA DipAdEd MPhil PhD
16925 £88.00
  
12.45-14.45 Thursday 22 January 2015
(8 meetings) Baljaffray Parish Church, Grampian Way, Baljaffray, Bearsden
Further Info

The American civil rights movement

We will consider the people, the events, the progress and the impact of the modern American civil rights movement. We will examine the origins of the movement, significant events including the Montgomery bus boycott, and the different ideas and strategies which characterised this tumultuous period. The significant role played by the often unheralded community activists who helped shape the movement will be examined in addition to the contribution of well-known leaders such as Dr Martin Luther King Jr. The course will be supported with film and primary source documents.

Robert Hamilton MA DipAdEd MPhil PhD
16926 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Friday 23 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

European and World

The United States as a global power: challenges and opportunities since the end of the Cold War

Day/half-day Event The United States remains the dominant power in the world. Since the end of the Cold War it has possessed unprecedented military, political and economic resources and influence. However, the promise of a "new world order" remains unfulfilled and the Obama administration has yet to find a focus to balance US power and responsibility in the twenty first century. This course will explore the foundations of US global power in the Cold War period and examine the search for a new global order in the 1990s under American influence. The impact of 9/11 will be assessed and the contribution of the Bush administration to the reformulation of foreign policy will be interrogated. The challenges to US power in the twenty first century will be assessed and questions in respect of the stability of the existing system will be posed.

Brian Girvin BA MA PhD FRHS
16663 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 14 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

The Holocaust

The mass murder of the European Jews by the Nazis stands out as one of the most horrific events in world history. This course offers a detailed, careful and comprehensive analysis of the descent of the Nazi persecution of the Jews into genocide. Using a wide range of primary and secondary sources, this course will also consider Holocaust denial and assess the legacy of the Holocaust to the modern world.

Robert Lynch BA PhD
17040 £88.00
  
 Level  
11.00-13.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

An introductory history of the Far East

A historical review of three major regions in the Far East, India,China and Japan from around 700BC to the present day,assessing the different political,cultural and religious pressures which have shaped three of the world's most important modern nations.

Oliver Thomson MA PhD
17591 £110.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Friday 03 October 2014
(10 meetings) Campus

1945: Seventy years on

Day/half-day Event This course is being held very near the seventieth anniversary of V-E Day ("Victory in Europe Day"), 8 May 1945; this was one of the most significant dates in the history of the twentieth century, Hitler was dead and Nazi Germany had surrendered, with its crimes against humanity now fully exposed. The year 1945 also marked the beginning of a new historical era. Concentrated in a short period were radical political change in Europe, the first use of nuclear weapons, the onset of the Cold War, and the beginning of the end of the European empires. There will be four sessions in this one-day course; in each an expert will talk about the end of its war and its consequences, and open a discussion.

Evan Mawdsley BA MA PhD Alex Marshall MA MA PhD Ben Shepherd BA MA PhD Juliette Pattinson BA MA PhD
17659 £30.00  Level  
10.00-16.00 Saturday 09 May 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

Europe's first "Great War" - the Thirty Years War 1618-48

Seventeenth century Europe is remembered as the age of the Baroque and the 'Scientific Revolution', less well remembered is the series of bloody religious wars known as the 'Thirty Years War' which raged across Europe and left Germany devastated. Using a rich array of official documents, personal letters, newpapers and art, we will investigate Europe's first 'Great War'- from Ireland and Scotland to Poland and Russia. Through the eyes of princes and emperors, captains and soldiers, civilians and priests we will explore its 'all destructive fury': the causes and conduct of the war, its financial and human costs, and its role in shaping modern Europe. With 'interventionism' so fundamental to modern Western dipolamcy, the lessons of the Thirty Years War highlight the fatal price of etanglement in other peoples' wars.

Patrick J F Parsons MA PGCE
18042 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Monday 19 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Goudou-Goudou: after the Earthquake: five years of reconstruction in Haiti

Day/half-day Event On January 12, 2010 a massive earthquake in Haiti flattened the capital, Port au Prince, and killed more than 250,000 people. The international community gave immediate help and promised assistance to rebuild a better Haiti. A little of it has been delivered but much has not and the difficulties facing the people of Haiti remain immense. But despite that there is a determination to rebuild and reconstruct supported by a dynamic history of cultural resistance to oppression and exploitation.

Paul Sutton Phd MLitt BSc Eve Hayes de Kalaf BA MA Rachel Douglas PhD BA to be decided
18065 £15.00
13.00-16.00 Saturday 17January 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Scotland and the Caribbean

Day/half-day Event Scotland has a long and continuing connection with the Caribbean. The course will explore this relationship beginning with a brief account of its role in colonial times and then go on to discuss in greater detail the key elements of its contemporary relationship. An important aspect of this is the African Caribbean community in Scotland whose contribution is often overlooked. It will conclude with an overview of work being done in Scotland to help reconstruction in Haiti after the earthquake.

Paul Sutton Phd MLitt BSc Graham Campbell Eve Hayes deKalaf BA MA
18080 £Free
14.00-16.00 Saturday 18 October 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Scottish, Irish and Local

Walks around Glasgow 2

Further fascinating sides of this city are explored in walks from Buchanan Street, in the Merchant City, in the Gorbals, the Necropolis and in two riverside areas. Do you know the characters, buildings, history and sculptures around the city? Find out about them. Be clad and shod for Glasgow's hills and weather though preferably avoid bringing umbrellas. We neither stroll nor race around the city. Light binoculars can be of use to see details on buidlings. You do not need to have done other walk series to join this one. Meet at the Lighthouse, Mitchell Lane for the first one. Prerequisite: ability to cope with Glasgow's terrain and a reasonably brisk walking tempo.

Margaret Anderson MA MSc
16342 £66.00 (£)
10.00-12.00 Tuesday 14 April 2015
(6 meetings) Off-Campus
Further Info

Walks around Glasgow 5

Come and discover areas away from the city centre. A second part of the Necropolis, Partick and Partickhill, Maryhill, part of Govan and of the East End allow us to see the differing aspects of the city and its history, residental and industrial sides. Be shod and clothed to meet the problems of Glasgow's weather and hills. Please consider bringing light binoculars and leaving umbrellas at home. The pace will be more than a stroll but not too brisk. The first walk starts outside the Kelvin Hall at the old Museum of Transport entrance. Prerequisites: ability to cope with Glasgow's hills.

Margaret Anderson MA MSc
16423 £66.00
14.00-16.00 Thursday 16 April 2015
(6 meetings) Off-Campus
Further Info

Walks around Glasgow 3

Come and appreciate areas of the West End, more of the City Centre and of the Gorbals. Glasgow's history, characters, sculpture and architecture will be looked at. Our pace will not be a stroll but not too brisk either. Please come ready to cope with Glasgow's hills and weather re footwear and clothing; light binoculars might be of use, but umbrellas are not appropriate. No previous experience of these walks is needed and the first walk starts at the St. Andrew's Building. Prequisite: ability to cope with Glasgow's terrain and a reasonably brisk walking tempo.

Margaret Anderson MA MSc
16437 £66.00
14.00-16.00 Tuesday 14 April 2015
(6 meetings) Off-Campus

Walks around Glasgow 4

The West End is where the first two walks are, the others are in the Blythswood estate, along the Forth and Clyde canal, in Finnieston/Anderston and in Park Circus/Woodlands. Parkland, residental and industrial areas with their history, architecture and people are included. Be shod and clothed for Glasgow's hills and weather. The pace is between a stroll and a brisk walk. Binoculars might be of use but umbrellas are not appropriate. Walk 1 begins at the Great Western Road main entry to the Botanic Gardens. Prerequisite: ability to cope with Glasgow's hills.

Margaret Anderson MA MSc
16441 £66.00
10.00-12.00 Thursday 16 April 2015
(6 meetings) Off-Campus
Further Info

Research your Scottish local and family history

Do you have a favourite building, place or organisation you'd like to know more about? Interested in researching the lives of your ancestors, or the history of your house? This course will guide you through researching local and family history, and show you the best ways of storing and presenting your results. We will explore a wide variety of library, archive and Internet sources.

Ronnie Scott BA MPhil PhD FSA Scot
17521 £110.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Friday 17/ April 2015
(10 meetings) Campus
Further Info

The Scots: who do we think we are?

Following the events of 2014 (the Commonwealth Games, the Year of Homecoming and, of course, the referendum) – all of which have heightened Scotland’s profile – it is a good time to take stock of ourselves and to think about the kind of country we live in. This course explores our sense of identity as a nation and the ways in which that may have changed in recent years, as well as some of the imagery which has been used to depict Scotland both at home and abroad. We will also look at the nature of Scottish society and some of the different communities who make up Scotland, as well as Scottish communities living overseas in the diaspora.

Duncan Sim BA PhD
17544 £88.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Tuesday 20 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Scotland under the Stewart Kings 1371-1603

The failure of the Bruce line saw the emergence of the Stewarts as Scotland's royal dynasty. As monarchs, they embraced the Renaissance, entered into regal union with France, endured the Reformation and entered into regal union with England. Was James I truly a tyrant? Was Mary really the 'harlot of Rome'? Was James VI the 'wisest fool in christendom'?

Craig Haggart MA PhD
16636 £88.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Thursday 02 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

The Independence Referendum result: what it means for Scotland and the UK

Day/half-day Event This one day event will closely examine the result of the September 2014 referendum on Scottish independence and the social and political implications of the results for the people of Scotland, the wider UK and Europe. We shall also examine the implications for the future politics of Scotland and the UK.

Murray Leith BA MA PhD Dr Duncan Sim Dr Duncan Sim
16660 £30.00  Level  
10.00-16.00 Saturday 25 October 2014
(1 meeting) Campus

The Irish Revolution, 1912-1925

The years 1912-25 saw the violent end of British rule in Ireland and its replacement of two new Irish states representing conflicting visions of the Irish future. Presented by Robert Lynch, author of a new study of the period Revolutionary Ireland, 1912-25, the course will examine the causes, course and consequence of revolutionary change in Ireland from the first stirrings of revolt in Ulster, through insurrection, guerrilla war, political upheaval, civil war and partition, the legacies of all these changes which shape modern Ireland to this day.

Robert Lynch BA MA PhD
16912 £88.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Saturday 18 April 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Introduction to Scottish family history on the internet

Day/half-day Event This enjoyable day school will show you the best ways of using the internet to research your family history in Scotland and beyond. It will help you to identify reliable sources of information, to find and use on-line catalogues and databases and to collate and store your results. It is ideal for those with a specific family history project, as well as people getting started with the internet. Prerequisites: some familiarity with computers and web browsing.

Ronnie Scott BA MPhil PhDFSA Scot
17600 £30.00  Level  
10.00-16.00 Saturday 31 January 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

The Jacobites: remembering the 1715 rebellion

Day/half-day Event Three hundred years on from the famous '15, the Jacobites remain intriguing and compelling. This short class will provide students with an understanding of the origins and impact of the Jacobite movement, placing Scotland’s experience firmly within its wider British and European context. Was the failure of Jacobitism inevitable? Why have the Jacobites inspired such romanticism and myth?

Kirsty McAlister BA PhD PGCE
16948 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 23 May 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Glasgow's villages, burghs and suburbs part 5

Glasgow expanded to include settlements which had been on its outskirts, some industrial while others were residential. There are all sorts of quirky details to be discovered in these areas. This course we will be looking at areas such as Govanhill, Crosshill, Langside, and perhaps Dennistoun and Hyndland. Though some of you having been looking at such areas before, all are welcome to come on this further discovery.

Margaret Anderson MA MSc
16413 £88.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

West End Lectures

Experts on Glasgow’s outstanding Victorian and Edwardian West End present illustrated talks on aspects such as architectural heritage, stained glass, local and industrial history and transport.  All 8 topics are totally new and different from any in previous years, with in-depth lectures followed by extended discussions. This long-established series aims to educate and entertain within a friendly and welcoming atmosphere, and is hosted by BBC journalist Colin MacKay.

Ann Laird BSc Gordon Urquhart MA Colin MacKay MA
16833 £88.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 28 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

War, Reformation and Union: Scotland 1500-1715

The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were two of the most turbulent and momentous in the history of Scotland. The impact of the religious disruption of the Reformation, conflict with the ‘auld enemy’, civil wars and relations with Ireland is still evident. Increasingly close contacts between Scotland and England, notably through the Union of the Crowns and the later Union of the Parliaments, created modern Britain and made the Scots ‘British’. The major focus will be on the political, religious and military processes which transformed Scotland from an independent European power in 1500 to a part of a ‘Greater Britain’ in 1707 - a process which was never inevitable.

Kirsty McAlister BA PhD PGCE
17112 £230.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Wednesday 24 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Orkney - its history and prehistory

Orkney is a really amazing place with lots to appreciate, not least its past, from the rich archaeological discoveries pouring out every year, and then via Vikings, Mediaeval Times to the remains from World Wars 1 and 2. We will learn of the islands and their peoples over many centuries - indeed millennia.

Margaret Anderson MA MSc
16416 £88.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 22 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus

Scottish music hall, variety and pantomime

Following its successful introduction last year, this expanded course explores the history of Scottish music hall, from its origins in earlier theatre, fairground geggies and the National Drama to the emergence of variety and the great stars of the interwar years such as Tommy Lorne, Harry Gordon and Dave Willis. Culminating in the story of Scottish pantomime, the course combines illustrated talks featuring audio and archive film clips with the opportunity to share memories of Scottish pantomime and variety. Presented in association with the King’s Theatre Glasgow and the University of Glasgow Library Scottish Theatre Archive, the course also includes a visit to the Archive, and the opportunity to buy tickets at a special group rate for a performance of Peter Pan at the King’s Theatre (not included in the course fee).

Paul Maloney BA MPhil PhD
17669 £55.00
10.00-12.00 Saturday 08 November 2014
(5 meetings) Campus
Further Info

A history of the western seaboard of Scotland

This course will provide a history from the dark ages to the late nineteenth century. It will cover social, political and economic aspects from Dalriada, the Vikings, Somerled and the Lordship of the Isles to Jacobitism, famine, clearance and emigration.

Craig Haggart MA PhD
17073 £88.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Thursday 22 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

British radicals, rebels and revolutionaries 1790-1926

This course looks at some of the unheralded men and women of British history who swam against the tide of the times that they lived in. Beginning with Tom Paine and the radical movement of the 1790s we move on to consider the challenges and dangers faced by individuals and groups who stood up for their rights as industrailisation and the growth of towns and cities got underway.Trade unionism, freedom of speech and voting rights for the working classes and women of all classes were considered as dangerous ideas at one time or another. Moving on the 20th century, we look at how the aims of the early feminists and socialists were translated into poltical realities and we consider the compromises that were made along the way.

Tom O'Hara MA MSc PGCE
17571 £88.00
  
 Level  
13.00-15.00 Monday 06 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Treasures of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow

Day/half-day Event This half-day event will provide an introduction to the wealth of historical material held at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow and will range from early printed books, surgical instruments through to contemporary art. Participants will get the opportunity of seeing many of the items at first hand as we tour the building.

Carol Parry BA MA
17660 £15.00
10.00-12.00 Tuesday 12 May 2015
(1 meeting) Off-Campus
Further Info

Figures in Scottish history

This course will examine eight key figures in Scottish history, including William Wallace, John Knox, Mary, Queen of Scots, Bonnie Prince Charlie, David Livingstone and John Maclean. We will discuss their lives and their reputations during their own lifetimes and since their deaths. We will learn how they have been manipulated over the years to suit the particular aims and amibitions of individuals and groups.

Kirsty McAlister BA PhD PGCE
18074 £88.00
  
 Level  
13.00-15.00 Wednesday 01 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Language

Ùlpan Gaelic

Ùlpan Taster - Units 1 and 2

22381 £5.00
10.00-13.15 Saturday 29th November 2014
(1 meeting) Campus

Languages

Arabic

Arabic Stage 1

Beginners’ course concentrating on modern standard Arabic for daily use: we cover introductions, greetings, farewells, thanks/apologies, and move onto questions and answers on many topics (nationality, occupations, travel, using phones, shopping, etc.). The basic elements of reading and writing Arabic will be introduced.

John O'Donnell ohn O'Donnell
17812 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Arabic Stage 2

For students who can read Arabic script and wish to develop their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course concentrates more on the structure of modern standard Arabic than Stage 1 but there is still plenty of opportunity to practise conversation.

John O'Donnell
17881 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Chinese

Chinese (Mandarin) Stage 1

For beginners: Chinese pronunciation; describing people and things; everyday situations (making friends, shopping, eating etc.); tourist situations; modal verbs and the basic tenses; some Chinese character writing. (Mandarin Chinese is the official language of mainland China, Taiwan and parts of S.E. Asia).

Ellena Xiaoqian Zhou BA MA
17878 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Monday 06 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Danish

Danish Stage 1

Aimed at people with little or no knowledge of Danish. Students will learn how to handle everyday situations in Danish (e.g. introducing yourself, meeting people, describing things). Basic grammatical structures, mainly the present tense. Aspects of culture will be covered.

Dorte Al-Gailani
17880 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Dutch

Dutch Stage 1

Introductory course for people with little or no knowledge of Dutch. Students will learn to handle everyday situations in Dutch (e.g. introducing themselves, greetings, exchanging personal information, ordering food and drink, etc.). Emphasis on pronunciation, basic grammar, vocabulary building and culture of the Netherlands and Flanders, through paired/group activities, games, music, role play and visits from native speakers.

Carlo Van Den Heuvel MA
17827 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Monday 06 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

French

French Stage 3

Aimed at people with a good command of the French language and conducted mainly in French, the aim is to improve conversation and knowledge of French culture through pair/group activities, role-plays, use of authentic documents, film clips, songs etc. A variety of listening and writing activities will also form an important part of the course.

Véronique Miller MPhil
17819 £210.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Monday 06 October 2014
(20 meetings) Baljaffray Parish Church, Grampian Way, Baljaffray, Bearsden

French Stage 3

Aimed at people with a good command of the French language and conducted mainly in French, the aim is to improve conversation and knowledge of French culture through pair/group activities, role-plays, use of authentic documents, film clips, songs etc. A variety of listening and writing activities will also form an important part of the course.

Audrey Langlasse MA CAPES CIOL DipTrans
17820 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

French Stage 3

Aimed at people with a good command of the French language and conducted mainly in French, the aim is to improve conversation and knowledge of French culture through pair/group activities, role-plays, use of authentic documents, film clips, songs etc. A variety of listening and writing activities will also form an important part of the course.

Meriem Corr
17821 £210.00
  
 Level  
14.00-16.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

French Stage 1

A course for beginners in which useful structures and language learning will be practised through paired/group activities, role-play, games, songs etc. By the end of Stage 1 students will be able to handle everyday situations in French and talk a bit about the future; they will also be introduced to the past (perfect) tense.

Véronique Miller MPhil
17926 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.15-21.15 Monday 06 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

French Stage 1

A course for beginners in which useful structures and language learning will be practised through paired/group activities, role-play, games, songs etc. By the end of Stage 1 students will be able to handle everyday situations in French and talk a bit about the future; they will also be introduced to the past (perfect) tense.

Valerie Sztrausberg LLM PGCE
17927 £210.00
  
 Level  
14.00-16.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

French Stage 2

This course will revise the language covered in Stage 1. You will be encouraged to use past, present and future tenses and to explain and describe specific situations and events. There will be plenty of opportunity to practise speaking tasks in a relaxed atmosphere in pairs, role-plays, etc. Language structures will be systematically covered with some French background study. You will learn French and have fun!

Valerie Sztrausberg LLM PGCE
17934 £210.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

French Stage 2

This course will revise the language covered in Stage 1. You will be encouraged to use past, present and future tenses and to explain and describe specific situations and events. There will be plenty of opportunity to practise speaking tasks in a relaxed atmosphere in pairs, role-plays, etc. Language structures will be systematically covered with some French background study. You will learn French and have fun!

David Welsh MA PGCE
17935 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.15-21.15 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

French Stage 4

This course is aimed at those students who took French Stage 3 or are at an equivalent level. Classes will be conducted entirely in French and include group discussions based on themes such as news items, short stories, etc. All activities will be aimed at building and maintaining fluency. Grammar points will be dealt with when necessary.

Meriem Corr
18003 £210.00
  
 Level  
11.00-13.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

French Stage 4

This course is aimed at those students who took French Stage 3 or are at an equivalent level. Classes will be conducted entirely in French and include group discussions based on themes such as news items, short stories etc. All activities will be aimed at building and maintaining fluency. Grammar points will be dealt with when necessary.

Véronique Miller MPhil
18004 £210.00
  
 Level  
12.45-14.45 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Baljaffray Parish Church, Grampian Way, Baljaffray, Bearsden

Francais Niveau 4

Cette classe s’adresse à des étudiants qui ont déjà effectué le ‘stage 4’ ou un cours équivalent. Le cours permettra aux étudiants de discuter en français de thèmes variés tels que les actualités, la culture française et la langue française. En plus nous proposons des activités variées pour maintenir votre français à niveau en vocabulaire, grammaire et expression écrite. Nous choisirons un livre littéraire français que nous étudierons ensemble. Venez parler avec nous!

Meriem Corr
18005 £210.00
  
 Level  
14.00-16.00 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Francais Niveau 4

Cette classe s’adresse à des étudiants qui ont déjà effectué le ‘stage 4’ ou un cours équivalent. Le cours permettra aux étudiants de discuter en français de thèmes variés tels que les actualités, la culture française et la langue française. En plus nous proposons des activités variées pour maintenir votre français à niveau en vocabulaire, grammaire et expression écrite. Nous choisirons un livre littéraire français que nous étudierons ensemble. Venez parler avec nous!

Véronique Miller
18006 £210.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Baljaffray Parish Church, Grampian Way, Baljaffray, Bearsden

Gaelic

Gaelic Stage 2

Course is suitable for all non-beginners, whether they have followed Stage 1 or not. As well as offering greater fluency, it will cover essential background knowledge of Gaelic culture and history. Place names and personal names, according to the class’s interest, will be discussed.

John McGeachy BA
17877 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Gaelic Stage 1

This course is primarily intended for complete beginners and will cover: greetings, likes and dislikes, personal and place names and origins of words, basic tenses and word order; opportunities for conversation and an introduction to traditional Gaelic culture.

Joy Dunlop BA
18128 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

German

German Stage 3

Class for those who have completed Stage 2 or equivalent and is conducted mainly in German; conversation activities in pairs and small groups revolving around written articles and audio-visual materials; revision of different tenses and introduction to new grammar (e.g. reflexive verbs, word order, the passive voice). A focus on expanding confidence and skills in speaking German.

Irina Scheck MA
17836 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.15-21.15 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

German Stage 1

This course is for students with no knowledge of German. It covers everyday language, both spoken and written. Elements of basic grammar will also be taught. Students will learn to conduct simple conversations in everyday situations in a German speaking environment.

Richard Kirkwood BA PGCE
17838 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Monday 06 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

German Stage 1

This course is for students with no knowledge of German. It covers everyday language, both spoken and written. Elements of basic grammar will also be taught. Students will learn to conduct simple conversations in everyday situations in a German speaking environment.

Conny Hommel-Platt
17839 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.15-21.15 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

German Stage 2

This class is for students who have already completed German Stage 1 or equivalent. The course will cover revision and consolidation of Stage 1 and focus on expanding vocabulary and grammar, improving pronunciation, and increasing confidence communicating in German.

Esther Brown MA PGDE
17931 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Monday 06 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

German Stage 4

Dieser Kurs, in dem wir uns praktisch nur auf Deutsch verständigen wollen, bietet sich für Lerner an, die German Stage 3 absolviert oder ein vergleichbares Niveau erreicht haben. Der Schwerpunkt liegt im freien Sprechen, wozu viele Stimuli sowie Diskussionen und Partnerarbeit animieren sollen. Literarische Kurzformen, Liedtexte, Lyrik, Hörspiel-, Film- und Fernsehausschnitte sollen bei den Kursteilnehmern auch Lese- und Hörverstehen schärfen. Grammatik wird nach Wunsch behandelt und dem Bedarf der jeweiligen Teilnehmergruppe angepasst. Ein Kursbuch ist nicht erforderlich, die Materialien werden vom Tutor zusammengestellt. ‘Brauchbare’ Wörterbücher sind im Unterricht aber mehr als gern gesehen. Das Schriftliche hat in dieser Stufe ebenfalls eine ganz zentrale Rolle, steht und fällt aber ganz erheblich mit der Schreibbereitschaft der Teilnehmer während der 20 Kurswochen.

Riccarda A Mickovski
18134 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.15-21.15 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Italian

Italian Stage 2

A revision of the main structures from Stage 1. Everyday topics of conversation such as leisure, sport, travel, hobbies, etc; other topics as requested by students. Introduction to the perfect and imperfect tenses.

Maria Cunningham BA PGCE (PSE) PGDE
17814 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.15-21.15 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Italian Stage 2

A revision of the main structures from Stage 1. Everyday topics of conversation such as leisure, sport, travel, hobbies, etc; other topics as requested by students. Introduction to the perfect and imperfect tenses.

Luisella Golzio Mosley Dott.ssa
17815 £210.00
  
 Level  
14.00-16.00 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(20 meetings) Royal Yachting Club, Rhu, Helensburgh

Italian Stage 2

A revision of the main structures from Stage 1. Everyday topics of conversation such as leisure, sport, travel, hobbies, etc; other topics as requested by students. Introduction to the perfect and imperfect tenses.

Luisella Golzio Mosley Dott.ssa
17816 £210.00
  
 Level  
13.00-15.00 Friday 10 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Italian Stage 3

Consolidation and revision of Stage 2. Conducted mainly in Italian to extend competence and increase fluency. Group discussions and various materials will be used. Introduction to the conditional and subjunctive.

Christina Gislason
17869 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.15-21.15 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Italian Stage 3

Consolidation and revision of Stage 2. Conducted mainly in Italian to extend competence and increase fluency. Group discussions and various materials will be used. Introduction to the conditional and subjunctive.

Marilyn Allan Dott.ssa MA
17870 £210.00
  
 Level  
13.00-15.00 Friday 10 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Italian Stage 4

A review and consolidation of Stage 3. The main grammar points covered include a more in-depth look at the conditional, subjunctive and use of the ‘passato remoto’. The course will be conducted entirely in Italian and students will discuss a variety of topics. Videos, articles and short stories will be used to stimulate discussion.

Marilyn Allan Dott.ssa MA
17873 £210.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Friday 10 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Italiano Livello 4

Questo corso è stato pensato per gli studenti che hanno completato ‘Italian Stage 4’ o un equivalente. L’obiettivo è di migliorare il vocabolario e apprendere e praticare strutture linguistiche più sofisticate. La classe verrà tenuta esclusivamente in italiano e la grammatica sarà trattata secondo le necessità del gruppo. Oltre a leggere e creare testi originali, gli studenti esamineranno spezzoni di film e programmi italiani, discuteranno di attualità e prepareranno presentazioni su una varietà di argomenti a loro scelta. E’ prevista l’adozione di un testo di lettura.

Giovanna Vignati Dott.ssa Cert/Dip Spanish (Open)
17875 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.15-21.15 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Italiano Livello 4

Italiano Livello 4 è per coloro che hanno completato ‘Italian Stage 4’ o un livello equivalente. L’obiettivo è di migliorare il vocabolario e apprendere e praticare strutture linguistiche più sofisticate. La classe verrà tenuta esclusivamente in italiano e la grammatica C48 trattata secondo le necessità del gruppo. Oltre a leggere e creare testi originali, gli studenti esamineranno spezzoni di film e programmi italiani, discuteranno di attualità e prepareranno presentazioni su una varietà di argomenti a loro scelta. E’ prevista l’adozione di un testo di lettura.

Elisabetta Toreno Dott.ssa
17876 £210.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Friday 10 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Italian Stage 1

For complete beginners in which useful structures and language learning will be practised through paired/group activities, roleplay, songs, etc. By the end of Stage 1 students will be able to handle everyday situations in Italian (mainly in the present tense), and possibly be able to talk a bit about the past.

Elisabetta Toreno Dott.ssa
17882 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Italian Stage 1

For complete beginners in which useful structures and language learning will be practised through paired/group activities, roleplay, songs, etc. By the end of Stage 1 students will be able to handle everyday situations in Italian (mainly in the present tense), and possibly be able to talk a bit about the past.

Christina Gislason
17883 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.30 Thursday 15 January 2015
(16 meetings) Campus

Italian Stage 1

For complete beginners in which useful structures and language learning will be practised through paired/group activities, roleplay, songs, etc. By the end of Stage 1 students will be able to handle everyday situations in Italian (mainly in the present tense), and possibly be able to talk a bit about the past.

Luisella Golzio Mosley Dott.ssa
17884 £210.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Friday 10 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Japanese

Japanese Stage 2

For those who have completed Stage 1 or equivalent and are looking to improve their ability to communicate in a variety of everyday situations. There will be group work and paired speaking activities using audio-visual materials. By the end of the course you will be able to communicate effectively in Japanese with confidence and in a range of everyday situations.

Kazuko Dow BA UCLES CerPDATL
17817 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.15-21.15 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings)

Japanese Stage 1

For complete beginners. This course covers everyday topics of conversation and is practised through paired/group activities, e.g. introducing yourself, eating, shopping, etc. The course will also introduce and explore many interesting aspects of Japanese culture and how this differs from Western culture. Writing in Japanese characters (Hiragana and Katakana) will be covered in this stage.

Chie Ishii-McGinness BA MA MA PgDip
17856 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Monday 06 October 2014
(20 meetings)

Norwegian

Norwegian Stage 1

Situations covered are introductions, small-talk, shopping, holidays, eating out, etc. These will be practised through paired/group activities,role-play and games. Conversations will be mainly in the present tense though the past tense will be touched on.

Sheena Russell BA
17852 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Monday 06 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Norwegian Stage 2

Everyday topics of conversation (such as leisure, travel, family, etc.); increasing knowledge of vocabulary and expressions; the past and future tenses; conversational practice through activities similar to those in Stage 1.

Sheena Russell BA
17919 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Portuguese

Portuguese Stage 1

Course for complete beginners in which useful structures and language learning will be practised through paired/group activities, role-play, games, etc. Students will learn to handle everyday situations in Portuguese (mainly in present tense), and be able to talk a bit about the future and possibly introduced to the perfect tense. This course is also relevant to students visiting Brazil.

Ted Scanlon MSc
17900 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Russian

Russian Stage 1

A course for complete beginners in which useful structures and communication in everyday situations (introductions, asking directions, shopping, etc.) will be practised through paired/group activities, role-play, games, etc. The Cyrillic alphabet will be introduced and video materials and CDs will be used to practice pronunciation and comprehension skills.

Sonia Bates PGDip IT BSc
17850 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Russian Stage 2

Development of conversation skills around situations (hobbies, city and transport, my day, etc.); further study of grammar (e.g. uses of cases of nouns and conjugation of verbs) with the emphasis on their practical use. Audio visual materials, newspaper and magazine articles will also be extensively used.

Sonia Bates PGDip IT BSc
17860 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Russian Stage 3

This course is intended for those who have completed Russian Stage 2 or the equivalent. Further development of conversation and listening skills; revision of basic tenses and introduction to grammatical structures not yet covered. Activities will be based on reading and discussing newspaper articles and video materials.

Maria Mott BA MICS MCIL
17861 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Spanish

Spanish Stage 3

For students who have completed Stage 2 or equivalent. Talk about yourself, your interests and ambitions; grill the opposition; make brilliant suggestions and order everybody about. Conditional, past perfect and subjunctive (no problem!) covered; plus review of previous grammar input and various activities depending on the interests of group.

Liam Kane MA PhD
17823 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Monday 06 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Spanish Stage 3

For students who have completed Stage 2 or equivalent. Talk about yourself, your interests and ambitions; grill the opposition; make brilliant suggestions and order everybody about. Conditional, past perfect and subjunctive (no problem!) covered; plus review of previous grammar input and various activities depending on the interests of group.

Marcia Domínguez MSc MBA MA
17824 £210.00
  
 Level  
12.45-14.45 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(20 meetings) Baljaffray Parish Church, Grampian Way, Baljaffray, Bearsden

Spanish Stage 3

For students who have completed Stage 2 or equivalent. Talk about yourself, your interests and ambitions; grill the opposition; make brilliant suggestions and order everybody about. Conditional, past perfect and subjunctive (no problem!) covered; plus review of previous grammar input and various activities depending on the interests of group.

Victoria Reina Gil BA
17825 £210.00
  
 Level  
11.00-13.00 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Spanish Stage 2

For students who have completed Stage 1 or equivalent. Talking about various experiences in the past; telling fortunes; situations/vocabulary identified by students; the preterite, perfect, imperfect and future tense

Marcia Domínguez MSc MBA MA
17844 £210.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Monday 06 October 2014
(20 meetings) Baljaffray Parish Church, Grampian Way, Baljaffray, Bearsden

Spanish Stage 2

For students who have completed Stage 1 or equivalent. Talking about various experiences in the past; telling fortunes; situations/vocabulary identified by students; the preterite, perfect, imperfect and future tenses.

Linda Lovat BA
17845 £210.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Monday 06 October 2014
(20 meetings) Eastwood House, Giffnock

Spanish Stage 2

For students who have completed Stage 1 or equivalent. Talking about various experiences in the past; telling fortunes; situations/vocabulary identified by students; the preterite, perfect, imperfect and future tenses

Sofia Stewart Dip PR
17846 £210.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Spanish Stage 2

For students who have completed Stage 1 or equivalent. Talking about various experiences in the past; telling fortunes; situations/vocabulary identified by students; the preterite, perfect, imperfect and future tenses.

Leire Martiartu-Zugasti
17847 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.15-21.15 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Spanish Stage 4

Course suitable for those who have completed Stage 3 or equivalent. Course aim is to provide practice in spoken Spanish and to increase fluency and confidence: classes conducted almost entirely in Spanish; texts, periodicals, tapes, videos, etc. used as stimuli for discussion; students encouraged to take initiative in conversations; grammar revised as requested.

Victoria Reina Gil BA
17863 £210.00
  
 Level  
12.00-14.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Spanish Stage 4

Course suitable for those who have completed Stage 3 or equivalent. Course aim is to provide practice in spoken Spanish and to increase fluency and confidence: a lot of the class is conducted in Spanish; texts, periodicals, tapes, videos, etc. used as stimuli for discussion; students encouraged to take initiative in conversations; grammar revised as requested.

Linda Lovat BA
17864 £210.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Eastwood House, Giffnock
Further Info

Spanish Stage 4

Course suitable for those who have completed Stage 3 or equivalent. Course aim is to provide practice in spoken Spanish and to increase fluency and confidence: classes conducted almost entirely in Spanish; texts, periodicals, tapes, videos, etc. used as stimuli for discussion; students encouraged to take initiative in conversations; grammar revised as requested.

Sofia Stewart Dip PR
17865 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Español Nivel 4

Este curso está dirigido a estudiantes que han terminado Spanish Stage 4 o equivalente. El objetivo del curso es incrementar la fluidez y expandir el vocabulario y el uso de estructuras más sofisticadas. Las clases serán conducidas enteramente en español. Los estudiantes tendrán la oportunidad de discutir temas de actualidad, noticias, películas, etc. y leerán y discutirán una novela corta de actualidad. La gramática - según las necesidades del grupo.

Marcia Dominguez MSc MBA MA
17866 £210.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Baljaffray Parish Church, Grampian Way, Baljaffray, Bearsden
Further Info

Español Nivel 4

Este curso está dirigido a estudiantes que han terminado Spanish Stage 4 o equivalente. El objetivo del curso es incrementar la fluidez y expandir el vocabulario y el uso de estructuras más sofisticadas. Las clases serán conducidas enteramente en español. Los estudiantes tendrán la oportunidad de discutir temas de actualidad, noticias, películas, etc. y leerán y discutirán una novela corta de actualidad. La gramática - según las necesidades del grupo.

Marcia Domínguez MSc MBA MA
17867 £210.00
  
 Level  
10.00-12.00 Friday 10 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus

Español Nivel 4

Este curso está dirigido a estudiantes que han terminado Spanish Stage 4 o equivalente. El objetivo del curso es incrementar la fluidez y expandir el vocabulario y el uso de estructuras más sofisticadas. Las clases serán conducidas enteramente en español. Los estudiantes tendrán la oportunidad de discutir temas de actualidad, noticias, películas, etc. y leerán y discutirán una novela corta de actualidad. La gramática - según las necesidades del grupo.

Marcia Dominguez MSc MBA MA
17868 £210.00
  
 Level  
13.00-15.00 Friday 10 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Spanish Stage 1 Twice a Week

This is the standard Spanish Stage 1 course except that by meeting twice a week students complete the course in only 10 weeks. For people in a hurry to learn Spanish.

Mavourneen Watkins MA Cert Ed
17906 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 13 January 2015
(20 meetings) Campus

Spanish Stage 1

A course for complete beginners in which useful structures and language learning will be practised through paired/group activities, role-play, games, songs, etc. By the end of Stage 1 students will be able to handle everyday situations in Spanish (mainly in the present tense), and be able to talk a bit about the future and be introduced to the past tenses.

Mavourneen Watkins MA Cert Ed
17908 £210.00
  
 Level  
18.00-20.00 Monday 06 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Spanish Stage 1

A course for complete beginners in which useful structures and language learning will be practised through paired/group activities, role-play, games, songs, etc. By the end of Stage 1 students will be able to handle everyday situations in Spanish (mainly in the present tense), and be able to talk a bit about the future and be introduced to the past tenses.

Sofia Stewart Dip PR
17909 £210.00
  
 Level  
13.00-15.00 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Spanish Stage 1

A course for complete beginners in which useful structures and language learning will be practised through paired/group activities, role-play, games, songs, etc. By the end of Stage 1 students will be able to handle everyday situations in Spanish (mainly in the present tense), and be able to talk a bit about the future and be introduced to the past tenses.

Raquel Martinez Martin
17911 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Swedish

Swedish Stage 2

For students who have completed Stage 1 or equivalent. There will be a revision of the language covered in Stage 1 before moving on to speaking about the past. You will be gently encouraged to use more Swedish and there will be plenty of opportunity to practise speaking tasks in a relaxed atmosphere in pairs, role-plays, etc. Language structures will be systematically covered with some background to life in Sweden.

Hanna Jedh
17890 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Monday 06 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Swedish Stage 1

A course for complete beginners. Useful language input will cover everyday situations, e.g. introductions, meeting people, getting around, shopping, etc. Students will practise the language through a variety of communicative activities. Written homework will also be given. Basic grammar structures will also be covered and students will be introduced to interesting aspects of Swedish culture.

Hanna Jedh
17918 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Swedish Stage 3

For those who have completed Stage 2 or equivalent, and who wish to cover further aspects such as tenses and moods. The class will be conducted mainly in Swedish, and there will be an emphasis on speaking and listening, as well as writing and reading. There will also be some group discussions and project work.

Hanna Jedh
18014 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Thursday 09 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Turkish

Turkish Stage 1

Spoken and written Turkish for beginners; students will learn how to handle everyday situations in Turkish (meeting people, polite forms, asking directions, shopping, etc.) using the present tense.

Filiz Kirk
17837 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Turkish Stage 2

For those who have completed Turkish Stage 1 or equivalent. Further study of the structure of the language; building up vocabulary; talking about the past and the future; practice in speaking Turkish to improve fluency, pronunciation and confidence.

Filiz Kirk
17930 £210.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(20 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Ùlpan Gaelic

Ùlpan Level 1 - Units 1-24

TBA
18144 £210.00
  
19.00-20.30 Tuesdays and Thursdays
(30 September - 11 December 2014) Campus

Ùlpan Level 2 - Units 25-48

TBA
18145 £210.00
  
19.00-20.30 Tuesdays and Thursdays
(13 January - 26 March 2015) Campus

Ùlpan Level 3 - Units 49-72

TBA
18146 £210.00
  
19.00-20.30 Tuesdays and Thursdays
(14 April - 2 July 2015) Campus

Law

"There's been a murder." Criminal law in action

Day/half-day Event This course sets out the background to the criminal process; by reference to actual cases, we discuss the range of evidential sources, the rules that apply to the conduct of criminal cases, access to justice and seek to understand the trial and jury processes. The topics will be illustrated by reference to current cases. If you have ever fancied being Rumpole, Taggart or a judge, this course is for you with interactive sessions and scenarios to debate to gain an in depth understanding of criminal law in Scotland today.

Gillian Mawdsley LLM LLB Dip LP Dip FM NP
17569 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 29 November 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Law in the 21st century: examination of Law in our culture, literature and fiction

This course is in two parts. Part One sets out the background of examining "what law is". How should law evolve to deal with challenges of contemporary Scotland. What is the impact of our multicultural society, European Convention of Human Rights, Equality Act, increasing criminalisation of new offences and technological developments such as social media. Part Two will concentrate on the effect that literature and films have on our perceptions of law. By using American and UK film and literature we debate how and if such a medium seeks to educate, entertain and inform us.

Gillian Mawdsley LLM LLB Dip LP Dip FM NP
18047 £30.00
18.30-21.00 Thursday 05 March 2015
(2 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Death, medicine and the law

Day/half-day Event Death should be private. How and why are there investigations into deaths? This course will consider and provide an understanding of the respective roles of the Crown, Police and Doctors in investigating deaths. It will consider the public inquiry system and look at its remit in hearing such inquiries by looking at incidents such as Dunblane, Ibrox and Lockerbie. How do they helping shape legislation and practices to avoid such incidents arising again? There will be a chance too to consider how the Law should deal with ethical issues and the end of life debate.

Gillian Mawdsley LLM LLB Dip LP Dip FM NP
18084 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Wednesday 04 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Literature, Creative Writing and Film

Creative Writing

Dialogue in fiction

Day/half-day Event This is a practical one day course that focuses on dialogue in fiction. The following questions will be addressed. How is successful dialogue constructed? What techniques do writers use to create dialogue? Why is some diaolgue flat and unconvincing? What is movement within dialogue? How is character developed through dialogue? What methods do writers use to capture "realistic speech"? Practical examples from fiction will be used throughout the day and students will have the chance to write in class and leave with a deeper understanding of how dialogue functions.

Alan McMunnigall BA
17517 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 01 November 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Fiction showcase 1

Day/half-day Event Over the years, the Centre for Open Studies has produced many notable, award-winning and widely published writers. These writers have enhanced the reputation of the Centre. Each year, new and returning students produce excellent work during their time at the Centre.This event showcases the work that has been written during the term by creative writing students. Students will read stories, extracts from novels and other fiction forms at this special event that will also include music, visual art and refreshements. All welcome.

To be advised
17509 £5.00
18.30-21.00 Tuesday 09 December 2014
(1 meeting) STUC Building, Woodlands Road, Glasgow
Further Info

Getting more out of poetry

There is no poeTRY without that little word 'try' and this new class is perfect for anyone wishing to give writing a go. We are ALL artists and every authentically lived, happy, useful and balanced life is an evolving work of art. "To be yourself and to make that self worth being", was, for Hugh MacDiarmid the purpose of poetry. Every poet may be a special sort of person; but every person is DEFINITELY a special sort of poet. Language is power. By helping us understand how others think and feel, reading and writing poetry develops self expression, self realisation and self fulfilment. It broadens and deepens us. And its fun! Poetry is also the ultimate 'transferable skill'. This course is suitable for writers of all levels of experience or none.

Donny O'Rourke MA MPhil
17682 £198.00
  
14.00-16.00 Wednesday 01 October 2014
(18 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Writing fiction: residential weekend

This residential weekend will take place in the beautiful surroundings of the Isle of Arran. The weekend includes accommodation, full breakfast and dinner. Five classes in writing fiction will be held and particpants can also perform readings of their work. There will also be the opportunity to explore the island.

Alan McMunnigall BA
17519 £200.00
Friday - Sunday
(1 meeting) Isle of Arran
Further Info

Character in fiction

Day/half-day Event Character is one of the most fundamental and important elements of fiction. This day school will look at how writers create characters. We will examine the techniques and approaches that writers use to create memorable and believable characters. Published work will be examined to see examples of successful characterisation in fiction. Students will write in class, using writing exercises that will allow them a deeper understanding of how character works in fiction.

Alan McMunnigall BA
17512 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 07 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Writing fiction: the short story

This course will focus on the discussion of students' fiction and will involve a range of approaches to the creation of fiction. Extracts from novels and short stories will be examined in order to learn more about literary strategies and techniques. The main form discussed will be the short story.

Alan McMunnigall BA
17586 £88.00
  
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 20 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Creative writing: fiction

Intensive workgroup sessions will aim to develop skills in writing prose fiction (the novel and the short story). Discussions of students' work will be at the centre of the course and will build upon some literary analysis of well-known texts. This course offers you the opportunity to develop your skills in a friendly, supportive environment. Intensive workshops include peer critique and in-class writing exercises, as well as some literary analysis.

Pamela Ross BA Mlitt Cathy McSporran BA MLitt PhD
17667 £460.00
  
 Level  
18.00-21.00 Wednesday 24 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Getting more out of creative writing

EVERYONE can benefit from reading and writing poetry and this class is designed to help ANYONE starting to write, or wishing to develop their poetry. Each week a compositional task is assigned and the resulting poems are discussed at the next session. Carefully chosen examples of the art, craft and inspiration of poetry are analysed alongside the work of course participants. An atmosphere of generous cooperation and constructive candour informs every aspect of this informal yet exacting course. Many students have gone on to publish, bring out books, win awards or to prestigious post graduate degrees. Others have simply got greater fun and fulfillment from poetry and from being part of a nurturing, stimulating and supportive group of fellow practitioners. The tutor is one of Scotland's most respected poets and is an Honorary Teaching Fellow in the School of Education.

Donny O'Rourke MA MPhil
17547 £198.00
  
18.00-20.00 Thursday 02 October 2014
(18 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Writing fiction: taster 2

Day/half-day Event This taster is for people who are interested in taking a course in creative writing and would like to know more about what such a course involves. Come along and participate in a one-off class that allows students to work with an experienced tutor and to explore writing fiction, discussing fiction from a writer's perspective and joining in a group critique. All students will leave the session having completed a short story.

Alan McMunnigall BA
17549 £10.00
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 13 January 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Franz Kafka: a tribute night

Day/half-day Event Franz Kafka (1883 - 1924) is rightly regarded as one of the most important writers of the twentieth century. His influence extends across the modern and contemporary novel, cinema, theatre, radio, dance and other art forms. The prevalence of the term "Kafkaesque" underlines his continuing cultural impact. The writers he has influenced include Albert Camus, Jorge Luis Borges and James Kelman. In cinema his influence can be seen in the work of film makers such as Orson Welles and David Lynch. In the year of the ninetieth anniversry of his death, this tribute night will feature readings of works by Kafka - fragments, short stories and extracts from novels. In addition, works inspired by Kafka and written by creative writing students of the Centre for Open Studies will be premiered. The evening will also feature music and discussion.

To be advised
17643 £5.00
18.30-21.00 Wednesday 22 October 2014
(1 meeting) STUC Building, Woodlands Road, Glasgow
Further Info

An introduction to creative writing 2

In this daytime course, novelist Cathy McSporran introduces you to all kinds of creative writing. Try your hand at writing short stories, novels, non-fiction and drama, in an informal and supportive atmosphere. The classes are suitable for everyone, but nervous beginners are especially welcome.

Cathy McSporran PhD MLitt BA
17589 £88.00
  
13.30-15.30 Thursday 22 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Creative writing: the novel

In this course students will study the novel form, looking at structural aspects and techniques from a writer's perspective in order to help develop their own writing. The course will include writing in class, using exercises and prompts, and reading published work to better understand techniques. Each week students' own fiction will be discussed in a supportive environment. During the course students will have the opportunity to complete a portfolio of original writing.

Alan McMunnigall BA Pamela Ross BA Mlitt
17595 £230.00
  
 Level  
14.00-16.00 Saturday 27 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus
Further Info

The novel: redrafting and editing

How do writers redraft their work? What can we learn from the working methods of novelists when it comes to editing their work? These questions will be addressed during this course. An examination of how first drafts are re-worked and improved as second, third and fourth drafts will allow students to learn practical and valuable editing techniques that will inspire and enhance any manuscript. Editing of students' fiction will form the core of this course.

Pamela Ross BA MLitt
17497 £88.00
  
19.00-21.00 Thursday 16 April 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

A day of creative writing

Day/half-day Event Try your hand at creative writing in this one-day event. Novelist and short story writer Cathy McSporran introduces you to prose writing in a supportive and encouraging environment. The session is open to everyone, but nervous beginners are particularly welcome.

Cathy McSporran PhD MLitt BA
17558 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 11 October 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

The novel: the first fifty pages

This practical course may be taken by those attending The novel: getting started but is also open to new students. What challenges face novelists in writing the first fifty pages of a new work? Discussion of literary forms, techniques and how writers begin to structure a narrative work forms the basis of this course. Practical advice and helpful tips will be given to support those writing the early stages of a novel. Students' fiction will be workshopped in class each week.

Pamela Ross BA MLitt
17559 £88.00
  
19.00-21.00 Monday 19 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

An introduction to creative writing 3

In this daytime course, novelist Cathy McSporran introduces you to all kinds of creative writing. Try your hand at writing short stories, novels, non-fiction and drama, in an informal and supportive atmosphere. The classes are suitable for everyone, but nervous beginners are especially welcome.

Cathy McSporran PhD MLitt BA
17677 £88.00
  
13.30-15.30 Thursday 16/ April 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Creative writing: the short story

In this course students will study the short story form, looking at structural aspects and techniques from a writer's perspective in order to help develop their own writing. The course will include writing in class, using exercises and prompts, and reading published work to better understand techniques. Each week students' own fiction will be discussed in a supportive environment. During the course students will have the opportunity to complete a portfolio of original writing.

Alan McMunnigall BA Pamela Ross BA Mlitt
17640 £230.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Thursday 25 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus
Further Info

An introduction to creative writing 1

In this daytime course, novelist Cathy McSporran introduces you to all kinds of creative writing. Try your hand at writing short stories, novels, non-fiction and drama, in an informal and supportive atmosphere. The classes are suitable for everyone, but nervous beginners are especially welcome.

Cathy McSporran PhD MLitt BA
17570 £110.00
  
13.30-15.30 Thursday 02 October 2014
(10 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Writing fiction: the novel

This course will focus on the discussion of students' fiction with particular emphasis on novel writing. In order to learn more about narrative, use of dialogue, development of character and literary techniques, a contemporary novel will be studied and analysed during the course.

Alan McMunnigall BA
17668 £110.00
  
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 30 September 2014
(10 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Writing fiction: taster 1

Day/half-day Event This taster is for people who are interested in taking a course in creative writing and would like to know more about what such a course involves. Come along and participate in a one-off class that allows students to work with an experienced tutor and to explore writing fiction, discussing fiction from a writer's perspective and joining in a group critique. All students will leave the session having completed a short story.

Alan McMunnigall BA
17572 £10.00
19.00-21.00 Monday 22 September 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Creative writing: fiction

Intensive workgroup sessions will aim to develop skills in writing prose fiction (the novel and the short story). Discussions of students' work will be at the centre of the course and will build upon some literary analysis of well-known texts. This course offers you the opportunity to develop your skills in a friendly, supportive environment. Intensive workshops include peer critique and in-class writing exercises, as well as some literary analysis.

Alan McMunnigall BA Pamela Ross BA Mlitt
17666 £460.00
  
 Level  
10.00-13.00 Saturday 27 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Margaret Atwood: a tribute night

Day/half-day Event Margaret Atwood is a renowned novelist, short story writer, essayist and poet. Her work embraces myth, fable, fairy tales, realism and fantasy. Notable works include The Handmaid's Tale, Alias Grace, The Blind Assassin and Oryx and Crake. Her contribution to areas of thought, such as feminism and politics has led to her being ragarded as one of the most important writers in contemporary literature. This tribute night will feature readings of Atwood's stories and poems. In addition, works inspired by Atwood and written by creative writing students of the Centre for Open Studies will be premiered. The evening will also feature music and discussion.

To be advised
17492 £5.00
18.30-21.00 Wednesday 13 May 2015
(1 meeting) STUC Building, Woodlands Road, Glasgow
Further Info

Fiction showcase 2

Day/half-day Event Over the years, the Centre for Open Studies has produced many notable, award-winning and widely published writers. These writers have enhanced the reputation of the Centre. Each year, new and returning students produce excellent work during their time at the Centre.This event showcases the work that has been written during the term by creative writing students. Students will read stories, extracts from novels and other fiction forms at this special event that will also include music, visual art and refreshements. All welcome.

To be advised
17651 £5.00
18.30-21.00 Tuesday 31 March 2015
(1 meeting) STUC Building, Woodlands Road, Glasgow
Further Info

Intermediate techniques in fiction writing

This course offers students the chance to join a more advanced fiction writing class. Intensive workshop sessions will focus on students' work. Published fiction will be studied in order to advance students' knowledge of structure and aid the application of techniques to their own writing. There is the opportunity to develop new fiction during the course, including a portfolio of original work. Only students who have successfully gained 40 credits on Level 1 Creative Writing courses will be eligable to take this course.

Alan McMunnigall BA Pamela Ross BA Mlitt
17504 £460.00
  
 Level  
14.00-17.00 Saturday 27 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Raymond Carver: a tribute night

Day/half-day Event Considered by many critics to be the most important short story writer of the twentieth century, Raymond Carver (1938-1988) continues to influence new generations of writers. Stories such as 'Cathedral', 'Will You Please be Quiet, Please?' and 'I Could See the Smallest Things' are cited by writers and readers as contemporary classics and he is regarded as a major innovator and exponent of the short story form. This tribute night will feature readings of Carver's stories and poems. In addition, works inspired by Carver and written by creative writing students of the Centre for Open Studies will be premiered. The evening will also feature music and discussion.

To be advised
17648 £5.00
18.30-21.00 Wednesday 11 February 2015
(1 meeting) STUC Building, Woodlands Road, Glasgow
Further Info

Writing fiction

This course will focus on the discussion of students' fiction. Topics such as tone, perspective, character, use of detail and dialogue will be examined and a range of different literary forms and structures will be discussed.

Alan McMunnigall BA
18178 £88.00
  
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 14 April 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Film

Getting more out of movies 2

Ever come out of the cinema wishing you could talk about what you have seen with an expert? Movies mean more to us if we know how to "read" them. Anyone can enjoy watching tennis or football but it's more fun if you know the rules! Learning how to analyse films doesn't stop us relaxing or enjoying them. On the contrary: knowing EXACTLY why some films impress and others don't makes an outing to the picture house even more fun and instructive fun is what our warm and welcoming approach guarantees. Though rigorous, the classes are informal and discussion based. Students go to the GFT in their own time and we gather once a fortnight to talk about the chosen film. This is the evening equivalent of our morning class, also run in association with GFT.

Donny O'Rourke MA MPhil
17582 £110.00
  
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 01 October 2014
(10 meetings)
Further Info

The Melted Heart

Italian screenwriter Inga J Sempel from Storm and Light Pictures, www.stormandlightpictures.com, will take you on a journey through the developments of her latest feature film script “The Melted Heart”, from first inspiration to historical research and the pre-production stage .The story is inspired by the real life events of Italian prisoners of war in Orkney during the Second World War and tells how a young Italian prisoner overcomes the barriers of his imprisonment to conquer a local girl's heart.

Inga J Sempel
22161 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 31 January 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

Getting more out of movies 1

Ever come out of the cinema wishing you could talk about what you have seen with an expert? Movies mean more to us if we know how to "read" them. Anyone can enjoy watching tennis or football but it's more fun if you know the rules! Learning how to analyse films doesn't stop us relaxing or enjoying them. On the contrary: knowing EXACTLY why some films impress and others don't makes an outing to the picture house even more fun and instructive fun is what our warm and welcoming approach guarantees. Though rigorous, the classes are informal and discussion based. Students go to the GFT in their own time and we gather once a fortnight to talk about the chosen film.

Donny O'Rourke MA MPhil
17647 £110.00
  
11.00-13.00 Wednesday 01 October 2014
(10 meetings)
Further Info

World Cinema 2

Day/half-day Event Despite growing interest in foreign-language cinema at the box office, British cinema screens are still dominated by routine Hollywood fare. These day classes seek to broaden our horizons by examining some of the key films in the history of "World Cinema", as well as what we understand by the term. After focusing on European cinema in class one, this second class will look further afield, at the cinematic output of countries such as Japan, India and Iran, and how they have shaped the course of "World Cinema".

Chris Gow MA PhD
16586 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 21 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Getting more out of plays in performance

Discuss the plays you've seen! Coming out of the theatre we passionately yearn to talk about every detail of the production. Well now you can. And with an expert chairing the chat and providing insights, context and commentary. This is a class for ANYONE who loves drama. The performances reviewed will take in shows from Glasgow and Edinburgh - everything from RSC and RNT tours, to the Tron and Traverse and Citizens and Pavilion and Play and a Pie and a Pint. We'll even critique plays relayed live to the GFT, Panto, Rep, Avant-Garde, Carbaret.... The occasional DVD.... If it happens in a theatre it's up for conversational grabs!

Donny O'Rourke MA MPhil
17593 £135.00
  
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(10 meetings)
Further Info

World Cinema 1

Day/half-day Event Despite growing interest in foreign-language cinema at the box office, British cinema screens are still dominated by routine Hollywood fare. These day classes seek to broaden our horizons by examining some of the key films in the history of "World Cinema", as well as what we understand by the term. Class one will focus on Europe, looking at some of the most important artistic movements to emerge from countries such as France, Germany and Italy and how they changed the course of cinema history.

Chris Gow MA PhD
17052 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 25 October 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Literature

Now read the book: short stories

While film adaptations of novels often have to leave much out, those based on classic short stories can allow their themes to blossom in a different medium. This class will read, watch and discuss a number of stories and their film versions, looking at the art of adaptation as well as individual tales which inspired The Man Who Would Be King, The Company Of Wolves, Away From Her , 2001 and others. Extracts and film clips will be provided.

Andrea Mullaney MA PG Dip
17516 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

The later modern novel

In this course we will examine the novel from the time of World War Two, studying texts that employ a variety of literary styles and techniques. Major themes will be considered. Discussions will be placed within the overall context of literary historical movements. Authors whose work we will discuss include Margaret Atwood, Paul Auster, Bret Easton Ellis, James Kelman, Jean Rhys and Kurt Vonnegut.

Pamela Ross BA MLitt
16584 £230.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 23 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Scottish Literature on Screen

Dr Jeckyll, Miss Jean Broadie, Richard Hannay and a cast of supporting characters from Scottish literature have had other lives on film and television. This class explores how Scottish books, plays and other texts have inspired screenwriters and directors. We'll look at the originals and watch clips of the screen versions of a wide variety of texts, and discuss the relative merits of reading and viewing.

Ronnie Scott BA MPhil PhD FSA Scot
17536 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Friday 23 January 2015
(8 meetings)
Further Info

The Imperfect Garden: Measure for Measure and Michel de Montaigne

1604. Shakespeare has a new play out on Boxing Day, a winter-cold cosmos of diplomacy and self-discovery. And John Florio has recently brought out his luminous translation of Montaigne's Essays. Our passion for 'the I in ourselves' is met by both works in ways not seen again until the 21st Century. Flaubert said we would 'love Montaigne'. I can't promise that, but we'll read him: as Shakespeare did.

Anne Scott MA
17546 £110.00
  
13.00-15.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(10 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Now read the book: Jane Austen

From Mr Darcy’s wet shirt to the Californian teenagers of Clueless, Jane Austen’s hugely popular novels have repeatedly been turned into massively successful films, TV serials and now even YouTube online series. In this class, we’ll look at examples of adaptations of each of her books, as well as those very loosely based on her work or life, with clips, lecture and discussion. Just what is it about these books that has proved so adaptable? What has been the effect of the marketing of these versions and how has that affected Austen’s literary reputation? And what’s next for the ‘Jane Austen industry’?

Andrea Mullaney MA PG Dip
17596 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Tuesday 20 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

A Globe in the Window: A Celebration of Seamus Heaney

He said in 2000 that he found his bearings between the circumference and the first centre, that it would all be there in the poetry, out of the marvellous, the verity of his life. The poems are his maps: we'll follow him.

Anne Scott MA
17605 £110.00
  
13.00-15.00 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(10 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Shakespeare on his own stage: the case of Macbeth

The Scottish play is Shakespeare's version of what he fondly imagines to be life in Scotland. How close is it to what really happened in the early middle ages, and how much of it is really a sly compliment to the new King of England, James VI of Scotland?

Paul Innes MA PhD
16831 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 22 January 2015
(8 meetings)
Further Info

The 19th century English Novel

In this course major novelists will be used to examine key movements in the cultural, social and political history of the period and to trace how the Novel rose to become the dominant literary genre of the age. Authors will include Jane Austen Mansfield Park, Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre, Charles Dickens Great Expectations, George Eliot Middlemarch, and Thomas Hardy Tess of the D'Urbervilles.

Patrick Reilly MA BLitt
17560 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(9 meetings) Eastwood House, Giffnock

Early 20th century European writers

Europe in the first half of the 20th century was the setting for profound intellectual, social and political changes which continue to affect world history to this day. The course will consider certain major European writers to investigate these world-transforming developments. Authors will include Thomas Mann Death in Venice, Mario and the Magician, Kafka The Trial, Metamorphosis, In the Penal Settlement, Sartre Nauseau, Huit Clos and Camus The Myth of Sisyphus, The Outsider, Cross Purpose.

Patrick Reilly MA BLitt
17664 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Thursday 22 January 2015
(8 meetings) Eastwood House, Giffnock

Literature of the First World War

Soldier poets from the Great War have become twentieth century classics; present-day novelists have revisited the conflict; the centenary has called out a mass of new material. How and why is its literature so different in many ways from that of World War Two and later conflicts? We shall consider wartime politics and military strategy only in so far as they influence writers struggling to comprehend horrific experience.

Ann Karkalas MA MLitt
18364 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Monday 26 January 2015
(8 meetings)
Further Info

Merchants House of Glasgow Talks

Macbeth

Day/half-day Event

Paul Innes
16429 £5.00
12.00-13.00 Wednesday 01 October 2014
(1 meeting) Off-Campus

18th century pioneers - William Hunter and Captain Cook

Day/half-day Event The Hunterian is Scotland's oldest public museum and is the legacy of Dr William Hunter (1718 - 1783), an obstetrician and teacher with a passion for collecting. It houses an exciting collection of both natural and artificial "curiosities", many of which are believed to have come from the voyages of Captain James Cook. Dr Sally-Anne Coupar will talk about this internationally important collection, bringing along some rare artefacts from the stores.

Sally-Anne Coupar PhD MA PGCAP
16434 £5.00
12.00-13.00 Wednesday 05 November 2014
(1 meeting) Off-Campus

The Sun: our local star

Day/half-day Event Innocuous thought it looks, the Sun is an amazing globe of hot gas enormous, on a human scale. We'll take a quick look at its nature, comparing it with other stars, and go on to consider the beautiful and enigmatic phenomena of its dynamic, sometimes explosive outer layers. Might they have consequences here on Earth?

Alexander L MacKinnon BSc PhD FRAS
16348 £5.00
12.30-13.30 Wednesday 04 February 2015
(1 meeting) Off-Campus
Further Info

Darwin in Scotland

Day/half-day Event Charles Darwin, the father of evolution studied in Edinburgh, visited Glasgow and explored parts of the highlands. This talk explores Darwin's connection with Scotland from his earliest observations of marine life in the Firth of Forth to his interest in Scottish geology. We will discuss how these informative years and experiences are likely to have influenced his later work in Origin of Species.

Dominic McCafferty BSc PhD
16414 £5.00
12.00-13.00 Wednesday 14 January 2015
(1 meeting) Off-Campus

The Scottish Colourists

Day/half-day Event The Scottish Colourists - Fergusson, Peploe, Cadell and Hunter - are now recognised as among Scotland’s most significant artists and each one has been the subject of a major exhibition in the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art. They exhibited together for the first time in Paris in 1924 and only Fergusson lived long enough to hear himself described as a ‘Colourist’. Come along and find out more about them - who they were, who influenced their art, what they shared in common and how each made such an important contribution to the development of Scottish painting in the early twentieth century.

Maureen Park MA AMA PhD
16370 £5.00
12.00-13.00 Wednesday 01 April 2015
(1 meeting) Off-Campus

Mindfulness

Using mindfulness to work with loss, grief and bereavement

Day/half-day Event Loss, grief and bereavement affects all of us at some time. A mindfulness framework can allow us to explore loss, grief and bereavement with compassion. The use of mindfulness to support clients and therapists with anticipatory loss, complicated grief, and palliative care working is considered. Working in this environment it can be difficult and stressful for therapists so the importance of keeping therapists safe will be covered.

Karen Fenna
17249 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 06 December 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Mindfulness and Buddhism

Mindfulness is valuable for anyone wishing to open the door to a fuller, richer experience of life. It's a way of waking from the half-life of habit, knee-jerk reaction and limiting self-views, allowing individuals to engage with a more active, conscious role in life. This short course explore how Mindfulness has been drawn from the Buddhist meditation tradition and applied within our current society to enhance wellbeing and effectiveness.

Richard Michael McCalmont BA BACP Counsellor
17045 £30.00
18.30-21.00 Monday 09 March 2015
(2 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Mindfulness and art psychotherapy

Day/half-day Event Mindfulness is the ability to identify with the present moment without judgements and with appreciation. Mindfulness teaches us to live in the present moment where our real lives are unfolding and where we can make skilful choices. Mindfulness and art psychotherapy go hand in hand, offering both support and challenge. Mindfulness is presented as a way of life that is joyful, spontaneous, energised and engaged and during this day event its application to art and art psycotherapy will be made clear.

Karen Fenna
17113 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 14 March 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Mindfulness based stress reduction

This course covers the theoretical and practical aspects related to Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction. MBSR skills are used widely now in a range of fields to help manage stress and anxiety. The teaching approach will involve discussion of relevant research, guided meditations, and enquiry into experience. Students will be encouraged to adopt critical thinking skills and engage in home practice to further deepen understanding of the area.

Alastair Storie BA MSc PG Dip PG Cert. C Psychol
17592 £88.00
  
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 21 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Mindfulness - managing stress and bringing peace to your work and home life

Day/half-day Event This course will help participants understand the significant benefits of mindfulness in both their professional and personal life. Through case studies, participants will learn how others have benefitted from introducing mindfulness to their lives. You will also have an experiential introduction to mindfulness as well as having practical tips on how to introduce mindfulness, both at home and at work.

Angela McCusker BA CA MBA MSc
17673 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 28 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Taster in mindfulness

“Mindfulness is the practice of paying attention from moment to moment to whatever arises, with curiosity and without judgement” (Jon Kabat-Zinn). Its concepts are becoming ever more popular in a range of areas, such as education, counselling, and business. An overview of the evidence for mindfulness-based approaches to reducing stress will be offered. In addition, insight will be offered into the approaches used. This taster provides an opportunity to explore this topic before enrolling on some of our other mindfulness courses.

Alastair Storie BA MSc PG Dip PG Cert. C Psychol Chartered Psychologist, BA,MSc, PG Dip, PG Cert.
17626 £30.00
18.30-21.00 Monday 29 September 2014
(2 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Taster in mindfulness

Mindfulness is the practice of paying attention from moment to moment to whatever arises, with curiosity and without judgement (Jon Kabat-Zinn). Its concepts are becoming ever more popular in a range of areas, such as education, counselling, and business. An overview of the evidence for mindfulness-based approaches to reducing stress will be offered. In addition, insight will be offered into the approaches used. This taster provides an opportunity to explore this topic before enrolling on some of our other mindfulness courses.

Alastair Storie BA MSc PG Dip PG Cert. C Psychol
17627 £30.00
18.30-21.00 Tuesday 28 April 2015
(2 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Mindfulness and sport

Sport, like many other areas of life is becoming more aware of the potential benefits of mindfulness. Attendees on this course will gain an understanding of the basic principles of mindfulness and how it is currently employed in sport. Tuition will involve direct experience of the skills, and evaluation of the underpinning theories and research. The intention is to develop strategies which can enhance the performance of athletes and practitioners.

Alastair Storie BA MSc PG Dip PG Cert. C Psychol
18072 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 24 January 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Mindfulness in addiction recovery

Day/half-day Event It can be argued that the core of addiction is avoidance of painful emotional states and the use of substances or behaviours to escape living in the present moment. Mindfulness helps develop greater acceptance of life’s challenges and awareness of the triggers that can precede relapse. This introductory course aims to assist you to experientially discover the links between mindfulness and relapse prevention. Through self-awareness, recovering addicts can be supported to apply mindfulness and take preventive action minimising the risk of relapse.

Rosie West BA PgCert
18086 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 07 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Music

Popular music studies: an introduction

The course acts as an introduction to the academic study of popular music. It aims to develop an understanding of popular music and the role it plays within society. The course adopts a broadly cultural studies approach and locates the music within broader historical and social contexts. The overall aim of this course is to introduce students to popular music studies as an academic discipline.

Adam Behr MA MSc PhD
16389 £230.00
  
 Level  
18.30-20.30 Tuesday 23 September 2014
(11 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Reading and writing music 2

This course develops the skills of students with some experience of reading and writing music. It introduces the fundamentals of music theory and develops competence in sight reading and composition. It may also assist those preparing to sit a recognised examination. Computer-aided learning and practical activities will play a significant part in the course.

Moira Ann Harris BMus PhD LTCL PGCE
16565 £135.00
  
19.15-21.15 Tuesday 20 January 2015
(10 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Russian history in Russian opera

Nineteenth-century Russian opera is unusual in often finding subjects not from just any nation’s history but from crucial turning-points in the Russian past, sometimes as reflected through the national literary heritage. We focus on the historical perspectives offered by A Life for the Tsar, Boris Godunov, Khovanshchina and Prince Igor, all created against the backdrop of post-Napoleonic heightened national consciousness.

Stuart Campbell MA BMus PhD
16399 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Monday 06 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus

Reading and writing music 4

This course is for those who have completed Level 3 or equivalent. It further extends knowledge of music theory and enhances competence in analysis, aural awareness, composition and sight singing. It reinforces the foundations of musicianship, written harmony and arranging. Computer-aided learning, listening and practical activities are important features of the course. Please contact the department for advice regarding prerequisites.

Moira Ann Harris BMus PhD LTCL PGCE
16612 £135.00
  
19.15-21.15 Monday 19 January 2015
(10 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Reading and writing music 5

This course is for those who have completed Level 4 or equivalent. It reinforces previous knowledge of music theory and enhances competence in analysis, aural awareness and musicianship. Skills in arranging, composition and written harmony will be developed. Computer-aided learning, listening and practical activities are important features of the course. Please contact the department for advice regarding prerequisites.

Moira Ann Harris BMus PhD LTCL PGCE
16665 £135.00
  
19.15-21.15 Tuesday 14 April 2015
(7 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Portraits in music 2

A series of presentations about aspects of composers and compositions designed to help listeners get more out of listening. Classical music of all periods will be covered.

TBA
16350 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(8 meetings). Eastwood Theatre, Giffnock. Please note the meeting on 11th Fen 2015 will be in Eastwood House

Portraits in music 2

A series of presentations about aspects of composers and compositions designed to help listeners get more out of listening. Classical music of all periods will be covered.

TBA
16351 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(8 meetings) Steeple Hall, Kilbarchan

Opera afternoons

We sample the vast repertoire of musical theatre as displayed in the current season of Scottish Opera, the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and other performers. Composers likely to be represented include Gluck, Rossini, Verdi, Lehár, and Janácek. Various approaches are taken, sometimes looking at literary or mythical sources, the libretto, the first performers, production style and so on.

Stuart Campbell MA BMus PhD
16346 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Monday 19 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus

Reading and writing music 1 intensive

This course introduces the fundamentals of reading and writing music. Rhythm and pitch notation, scale formation as well as elementary sight-reading and composition will be included, allowing you to sing or learn to play a musical instrument with confidence. Computer-aided learning and practical work will be important features of the course.

Moira Ann Harris BMus PhD LTCL PGCE
16705 £135.00
  
13.00-16.30 Monday 03 August 2015
(5 meetings) Campus

Sir Walter Scott: literature, music and the fine arts

Day/half-day Event "Tis two hundred years since...": Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley Novels, art and music. In 1814 a then anonymous author began publishing a series of books which resonated powerfully in the work of painters and composers, mainly during the first half of the nineteenth century. After an outline of the character and significance of Scott’s activity, we consider examples in vision and sound, concentrating on Scottish subjects, in the hands primarily of leading British, French and Italian artists.

Stuart Campbell MA BMus PhD Andrew Hook FBA FRSE MA PhD Ailsa Turner BA PGCE
16394 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 29 November 2014
(1 meeting) Campus

Portraits in music 1

A series of presentations about aspects of composers and compositions designed to help listeners get more out of listening. Classical music of all periods will be covered.

TBA
16365 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(8 meetings) Eastwood Theatre, Giffnock. Pleae note that the meetings on 29 Oct, 5 Nov & 12 Nov 2014 will be held in Eastwood House

The orchestral season in Scotland

The course introduces some of the music to be played by Scotland's orchestras during the 2014-15 season. We shall examine a wide range of repertoire in detail, and will also explore relevant artistic and organisational issues that concern all the orchestras. Threads running through the whole season's concerts include American music, romantic symphonies and the music of Richard Strauss.

Hugh Macdonald BMus MLitt ARCO
17105 £110.00
14.00-16.00 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(10 meetings) Campus

Popular music history

This course follows on from Popular music studies: an introduction (XXX), and students are required to have undertaken this course (or a similar course, or have relevant music industry experience) and will be admitted at the discretion of the tutor. The course will place the study of the history of popular music within broader socio-economic trends and increase students’ understanding of popular music studies as an area of academic study. It will encompass an evaluation of the roles of various agencies in the development of popular music history, feminist critiques of popular music history, and critical engagement with key text in popular music studies.

Adam Behr MA MSc PhD
18012 £230.00
  
 Level  
18.30-20.30 Tuesday 13 January 2015
(11 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Scottish Modernism: literature, music, painting and Erik Chisholm

Day/half-day Event Erik Chisholm (1904-1965) was a vital force in the arts at a crucial time in Scotland in the 1920s and 1930s, bringing internationally significant figures like Bartók to Scotland. His activities as composer, performer and catalyst are set in the context of his contemporaries - Ronald Center and F G Scott, Lewis Grassic Gibbon and MacDiarmid, J D Fergusson and Stanley Cursiter. The presentation will be abundantly illustrated in sound and vision. A series of performances is being arranged to coincide with the 50th anniversary of Chisholm's death - details will be available later.

John Purser MA PhD Alan Riach BA PhD
18060 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 06 June 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

The operas of Richard Strauss (1864-1949)

Day/half-day Event Strauss enriched music with compositions in many forms, perhaps nowhere more than by his fifteen operas. They span the gamut from Guntram, by way of Salome, Elektra and Der Rosenkavalier and the other works written in collaboration with Hofmannstahl, all the way to Capriccio, and represent half a century lived in the musical limelight. The course offers a conspectus of this large repertoire.

Derek Watson BMus LRAM
18062 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 25 October 2014
(1 meeting) Campus

Philosophy and Religious Studies

Famous philosophers half day series: Descartes

Day/half-day Event Descartes is often dubbed the father of modern philosophy; his radical separation of mind and body, and insistence on logic (rather than observation) as a route to knowledge, was at the heart of a revolution in philosophy that reverberates to this day, shaping not only modern philosophy but also literature, art, film, religion, politics and media. Nor can we get to grips with ancient or medieval thought without understanding how Descartes has given us an - often distorting - lens through which to gaze at them. Anyone interested in any aspect of western philosophy or theology will find this introduction to Descartes invaluable.

Sophie Cartwright BA MTh PhD
16392 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 07 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

20th century philosophy

The twentieth century witnessed some of western philosophy's greatest figures: Bertrand Russell, G. E. Moore, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Rudolf Carnap, Jean-Paul Sartre, Willard Van Orman Quine, Thomas Khun, and Michel Foucault. This course explores the ideas of these and many other mighty thinkers by charting the progress of philosophy during the better part of the last 100 years. This course provides an excellent grounding in the recent history of the issues that form the cutting edge of philosophy today.

John Donaldson MA MSc
16359 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Tuesday 20 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus

Philosophy and emotion

What are emotions? Are they simply feelings, blind irrational forces? Or do they have a deeper connection with human understanding? The first part of this course explores theories about what emotions are, from antiquity to the present day, including those of Aristotle, the Stoics, Darwin, William James, Freud, and others. In the second part we ask why emotions matter to us; is it because of how they feel, the goals they help us achieve, or something else? We consider the connection between emotion and moral value, and the question of our responsibility for our emotions.

Sophie Cartwright BA MTh PhD
16352 £230.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Thursday 25 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Philosophy - in Technicolour!

This course introduces a variety of philosophical issues as explored in works of film and television alongside a discussion of some of the central themes in the philosophy of art. We will address questions like "what is art?" and "are the origins of art biological or cultural?" And we will look at the work of Alfred Hitchcock, Woody Allen, Quentin Tarantino, Larry David, Monty Python, and David Simon. In this tour of some of the more erudite parts of popular culture, the philosophy of many great thinkers will be examined, including: Socrates, Plato, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, David Hume, Rousseau, Descartes, Kant, and John Stuart Mill.

John Donaldson MA MSc
16425 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Tuesday 30 September 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Philosophical ethics of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle

This course will examine Greek ethics focusing on Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. At the centre will be Plato’s Republic and Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. It is a stand-alone course and can be taken as a foundation course for many other areas of study. Anyone with an interest in western philosophy of any period in time will find this course useful as we go back to the basics of western philosophy and look at the questions which are still with us today, such "how should be live?", "what is happiness?" and "what is justice?"

Sophie Cartwright BA MTh PhD
16428 £230.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Wednesday 24 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Famous philosophers half day series: Nietzsche

Day/half-day Event Nietzsche's influence today remains enormous and extends far beyond the confines of philosophy. But what did he believe? In what sense was he a philosopher? Was he the first post-modernist? We will explore some key aspects of Nietzsche's thought; his perspectivism, his ideas about tragedy, music and culture, the nature of value, the problem of modernity and his ideal of how we should try to live.

Paul Harkin MA MPhil PhD
17030 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 02 May 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

Environmental ethics

What is wrong, if anything, with GM foods? Is it morally wrong to travel with your pet abroad? Should you neuter your pets? Should mountains, hills, rocks and rivers be protected from human activities? Is it morally wrong to eat meat? Are wind turbines morally good? You can answer these and many other environmentally related questions through this course.

Costas Athanasopoulos BA BA (Spec) PgDip MEd PhD FHEA
16440 £88.00
  
Monday 06 October 2014
(8 sessions) Off-Campus

Is science compatible with religion?

Day/half-day Event The theory of evolution is inconsistent with the literal account of human origins given in Genesis and other religious works. Other scientific theories are inconsistent with miracles, the efficacy of prayer, and the existence of supernatural beings that intervene in the natural order. But does this mean that religious belief in general is incompatible with a scientific worldview? This day-school will address this question by examining different conceptions of science and religion to determine whether any are consistent.

John Donaldson MA MSc
16334 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 22 November 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

God, faith, science and reason: an introduction to the Philosophy of Religion

Day/half-day Event Is there a God? How do we answer that question? Can we? Should a rational person follow a religion and also believe in the results of natural science? What is a religion, anyway? This course will provide answers to these and related questions by examining some of the classic arguments discussed in the philosophy of religion by great historical thinkers such as Plato, Leibniz and Hume, as well as more contemporary figures such as Alvin Plantinga.

John Donaldson MA MSc
16400 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 16 May 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Famous philosophers half day series: Schopenhauer

Day/half-day Event For Schopenhauer life is a pointless work-filled drudge where unsatisfied cravings continue until we cease to exist and return to a state where there is no God or judgement on our behaviour. If life were any better then we'd die of boredom. This is the worst of all possible worlds but there is a way to overcome the pointlessness of existence. Come and find out how.

Kenneth Hutton BA MPhil PhD
16968 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 28 March 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Life, the universe and everything! An introduction to philosophy

What is philosophy? What is it to philosophise? What do philosophers do? This course will answer these questions by charting the history of modern philosophy up to the present day, covering all the main areas of philosophy: metaphysics (the study of the ultimate nature of reality), epistemology (the study of knowledge and justified belief), value theory (the study of ethical, political, religious and aesthetic value), and logic (the study of reason). Along the way, the work of key figures from the history of philosophy will be discussed, including Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill, and Russell, as well as more contemporary thinkers.

John Donaldson MA MSc
16391 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus

Science fiction and philosophy

Day/half-day Event In this class we will examine philosophical issues commonly encountered to science fiction; including: (1) Time Travel: what happens if I go back and kill my grandfather? What does considering such questions tell us about the nature of time? (2) Personal Identity: if my Star Trek teleporter malfunctions and creates two copies of me while destroying the original, which copy is me? What does considering this issue tells us about the nature of the self? (3) The Matrix: is the world as it appears? Can you know that you are not in the Matrix, or a brain in a jar being supplied experiences by electrodes? What does considering these questions tell us about the nature of knowledge, perception, and our relationship with the world?

John Donaldson MA MSc
16393 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 31 January 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

The body in western thought

Having a body is a central fact of human existence, but how do our bodies relate to who we and others are and the way we experience the world? Are we the same thing as our bodies? Do we survive death and, if so, is this with our bodies, or not? Is the way we experience our bodies biologically inevitable, or is it shaped by our social and political context? How do sex and gender relate to the body? We will explore these questions, examining some of the most influential answers in western thought, from ancient philosophy to modern queer theory.

Sophie Cartwright BA MTh PhD
16356 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Monday 19 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

D'oh! The Simpsons introduce philosophy

Day/half-day Event The Simpsons is one of the modern world’s greatest cultural artefacts partly because it is so full of philosophy. Aristotle, Kant, Marx, Camus, and many other great thinkers’ ideas are represented in what is arguably the purest of philosophical forms: the comic cartoon. This day-school will explore some of philosophy’s most inspiring ideas as presented in Matt Groening’s monument to the absurdities of human existence.

John Donaldson MA MSc
16395 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 25 October 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Philosophy and music

Why does music matter to us? Since music has no words, how can it have meaning? Can music tell stories or express emotions? Should we judge rock or jazz music by different standards to those we use when appreciating "classical" music? What does it mean to say that music is sentimental or profound? This course looks at some of the recent debates in the contemporary philosophy of music.

Paul Harkin MA MPhil PhD
17246 £88.00
  
14.00-16.00 Thursday 02 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus

Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art

What is beauty? Are the galleries and curators the ones who decide what art is? Can there be an objective aesthetical value? Is Art and Aesthetics the Ethics and Politics of the Future? Can a work of art be immoral? In this course you will find answers to these important questions and you will get the chance to think about the core issues through the texts of Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, Tolstoy, Collingwood, Sartre, Wittgenstein and others.

Costas Athanasopoulos BA BA (Spec) PgDip MEd PhD FHEA
16360 £88.00
  
Monday 26 January 2015
(8 meetings)

A brief introduction to reasoning and argument

This course will use a practical and interactive approach to explore how, through applying the tools of philosophy, you can evaluate the "soundness" of arguments and present sound arguments. It is important to be alert to false arguments and to others' attempts to persuade you through appealing to your emotions. This course will increase your alertness to these situations through analysing real-life instances, gleaned from newspapers, TV and radio.

Margaret Kirkwood BSc MEd PhD
17047 £33.00
14.00-16.00 Monday 27 April 2015
(3 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Buddhism in more detail

Day/half-day Event This course is for those who have a basic understanding of Buddhism but would like to know more. It offers a mix of Buddhist philosophy and an outline of Buddhist practice as well as a look at the relationships to western philosophy. There are two tutors each with different expertise in Buddhism from which to draw.

Kenneth Hutton BA MPhil PhD Venerable K Sri Rewatha Thero BA MA PGDE
16804 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 14 March 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Business ethics

Is there any Ethics in Business or is the expression “Business Ethics” an oxymoron or a paradox? Find out how you can create and organise a business on the basis of a solid ethical and moral foundation. Whether you are a manager, a CEO or an employee you will find benefit through this course in your moral decision making in a business environment. Particular emphasis will be given to the study of practical application of ethical theory through concrete business study cases.

Costas Athanasopoulos BA BA (Spec) PgDip MEd PhD FHEA
16335 £88.00
  
Online course week beginning 13 April 2015
Online course (8 sessions)

What is love? Plato's Symposium

Love, wine and philosophy! The Symposium is one of Plato's most famous and accessible works. Written in the 4th century BC, it is set at a dinner party attended by a number of prominent ancient Athenians, including the philosopher Socrates. Whilst enjoying several glasses of wine, the guests take it in turn to speak of love. The book is also a Trojan Horse for some of Plato’s wider philosophical ideas and has had a significant influence on later thinkers. Students will gain a fuller insight into the foundations of the western philosophical tradition and other works of Plato.

Kenneth Hutton BA MPhil PhD
16842 £88.00
  
10.00-12.00 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Buddhism for all

Day/half-day Event This course is for those who are curious about the basics of Buddhism. It offers an outline of the major concepts of Buddhism such as karma and nirvana and an outline of Buddhist practice. There are two tutors each with different expertise in Buddhism from which to draw. The course is non-religious.

Kenneth Hutton BA MPhil PhD Venerable K Sri Rewatha Thero BA MA PGDE
16715 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 29 November 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Are we still human?

Day/half-day Event Technological and medical advances mean that the possibilities of human existence are constrained less and less by what our bodies are capable of. At the extreme, will we one day be able to "upload" human consciousness into computer memory? We will ask if we are still "human” and speculate about the possible lives of our distant descendants.

Alexander L MacKinnon BSc PhD FRAS Paul Cockshott BSc PhD John Donaldson MA MSc and others
16711 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 21 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Existentialism and the human situation

What kind of beings are we? In what sense are we free? What is it to live an authentic existence? How do we find meaning in our lives? This introductory course explores the central questions that define existentialism and its continuing relevance for contemporary philosophy. Click video for more..

Paul Harkin MA MPhil PhD
17194 £88.00
  
19.00-21.00 Thursday 22 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus

Famous philosophers half day series: Kant

Day/half-day Event Kant transformed philosophy. More than any other philosopher he attempted to reconcile human freedom with the growth of scientific understanding and to find a place for freedom, reason and aesthetic pleasure in a mechanistic world. Autonomy, moral thought and the role of emotion; whether we can know the world as it is - all these are issues to which Kant made key contributions. Even today, a grasp of Kant's arguments remains essential for anyone interested in these topics.

Paul Harkin MA MPhil PhD
16841 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 21 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

Women philosophers

In this course we’ll explore the thought of six key female philosophers covering topics such as human moral agency, race relations, and existentialism. Text book philosophy is often written as if there are no female philosophers to speak of. These insightful philosophers show the poverty of this approach and offer us a collection of voices from different female perspectives. We start with Mary Wollstonecraft, political philosopher and ethicist of the eighteenth century, and move onto later philosophers such as Elizabeth Anscombe and Angela Davis - thinkers whose philosophy has variously shaped the discipline and brought them to the coal-face of contemporary political discourse.

Sophie Cartwright BA MTh PhD
16403 £66.00 (£)
13.00-15.00 Tuesday 14 April 2015
(6 meetings) Campus
Further Info

An introduction to Philosophical Practice: what it is and what it can do for you

Day/half-day Event With DSM-5 you can say everybody is sick! So complained an American psychiatrist (and co-author of previous such psychiatric diagnostic manuals) recently. But do we need to resort to psychiatric help and expensive medicine to deal with mental and psychological difficulties we encounter in our daily lives? This course will enable you to decide when things go out of control and how to avoid getting things worse.

Costas Athanasopoulos BA BA (Spec) PgDip MEd PhD FHEA
16396 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 07 March 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

Beyond belief

With the emergence of New Atheism philosophers attempted to bring new techniques to bear on traditional problems regarding religion and religious belief. In this class we will explain what philosophical examination of religion is, address the matter of argumentation about God’s existence and take up the issue of whether or not belief in God needs to rest on rational argument.

Ioanna-Maria Love MA PhD
16734 £88.00
  
19.00-21.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus

It's alive! The philosophy of Artificial Intelligence

Day/half-day Event Can machines be conscious? If not, why not? If machines can be conscious, how can they, and what obstacles need to be overcome until we can build some? If conscious machines are ever built will this make human beings obsolete? This course will address these questions and more in the light of the very latest research in the philosophy of mind and cognitive science.

John Donaldson MA MSc
16369 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 25 April 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Famous philosophers half day series: Hegel

Day/half-day Event Hegel treats the community of persons as more fundamental than individual persons. He stresses that human life is essentially social and historical - that to be an individual person is to take up a series of socially instituted roles (husband, father, friend, plumber, teacher, footballer...). Hegel’s anti-individualism is the most potent and plausible alternative to the individualism that is at the heart of contemporary western culture. He has an exciting grand vision of reality as essentially rational, knowable and meaningful.

Jonathan Trigg MA MSc PhD
18044 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 28 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

Famous philosophers half day series: Hume

Day/half-day Event Hume argued that our most basic ways of thinking about ourselves and the world - ways of thinking shared by all people in all cultures at all times - are not based on experience or reason but are held in place simply by custom and habit. His work is still enormously influential. He is not just the most important Scottish philosopher, he may well be the most important philosopher full stop! Come and find out why he is still treated the world over as one of the most important thinkers who has ever lived.

Jonathan Trigg MA MSc PhD
18045 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 14 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

Famous philosophers half day series: Bertrand Russell

Day/half-day Event Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) was perhaps one of the most prolific and most influential of British philosophers in the twentieth century. Philosopher, Social Activist, Educational Reformer, Pacifist and Humanist, he was often the target of both admiration and criticism. In this course we will study three particular aspects of his work: his early critique of Neo-Hegelianism in Logic, Language and Mathematics, his attempt at Educational Reform and his engagement and support to the Nuclear Disarmament and the Peace Movement against the Vietnam War.

Constantinos Athanasopoulos BA MEd PgDip PhD FHEA
18122 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 23 May 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Wittgenstein

Wittgenstein argues that there can be no such thing as a theory or picture of the world which shows what different kinds of things there ultimately are and how they fit together. If we look for such a theory or picture in philosophy, religion or science, we are like Pooh Bear and Christopher Robin looking for the East Pole. Wittgenstein is sometimes considered the most radical and important of modern philosophers: he doesn't contribute another theory or picture to compete with those we already have - he explains (exactly) why no such theory or picture is even possible.

Jonathan Trigg MA MSc PhD
18640 £66.00
14.00-16.00 Wednesday 15 April 2015
(6 meetings) Campus

Psychology

Personality differences

Possessing an attractive personality can enhance our social standing among friends, family and colleagues. In our daily lives, we often strive to present an "ideal" personality to the world rather than our "true" authentic selves. Should we persevere in aiming for an ideal rather than a "true self? Or are we justified in hiding characteristics which we have learned are distastful to others? Through mini-lectures, discussion, questionnaires and quizzes, the course will present both sides of the argument.

Clare Caddell BA MEd PhD C.Psychol
16358 £83.00
  
 Level  
18.00-21.00 Wednesday 08 October 2014
(5 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Alexander technique

Day/half-day Event This day school introduces the principles of the Alexander technique, demonstrating how to use the principles to change habit patterns in everyday movement. The course will give a perspective on how the psychophysical connection in all of us can be integrated into existing activities, with opportunity to explore practical applications. Practical uses of the technique including bending, walking, using the voice, breathing will be explored and activities tailored to the needs and interests of participants. Enrolment limit 10.

Lynn MacDonald McLean MA MSTAT
17650 £40.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 02 May 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) for weight loss: exploring why it works

Day/half-day Event Ever wondered why people are always on a diet but never lose weight? Explore the reasons why people find it so difficult to maintain weight loss and how this can be turned around using Cognitive Behavioural Techniques. CBT is popular in the treatment of issues like phobias and addictions. After this workshop, you will have a greater understanding of the barriers to dieting and how CBT can tackle them.

Heather Campbell MA
16433 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 31 January 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Introduction to social psychology

This course provides insight into how in this dynamic social world, other peoples' lives are interwoven with ours. Interactions shape development, mental well-being and behaviour - often outside of our awareness. Some examples of topics under discussion will be: why adversity can be an aphrodisiac; how a whole nation might condone and participate in genocide; why prison guards need good training; why ordinary young people would riot in London.

Niamh Friel MA
16943 £230.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Wednesday 24 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus

Analysing personality

Day/half-day Event How true to ourselves is the personality we display to colleagues and friends? This class will identify the theories of “ideal self”; “actual self” and “true self” and how this knowledge can help us lead authentic rather than inauthentic lives.

Clare Caddell BA MEd PhD CPsychol
16419 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 21 March 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Developing the motivated, confident, mindful performer: Innovations in sport and exercise psychology

This course will provide an overview of the role of the sport and exercise psychology. Drawing on research, case studies, and real life examples, attendees will gain an understanding of the techniques and approaches employed to enhance psychological aspects of performance. In addition to traditional methods, more recent approaches which are influenced by acceptance-based models such as mindfulness will be explored. The course will also cover the optimisation of team environments and athlete development.

Jane McKay BSc MSc PhD Alastair Storie BA PGDip MSc C.Psychol
17540 £83.00
  
18.30-21.00 Thursday 30 April 2015
(6 meetings) Campus
Further Info

What can psychology tell us about disability?

This course will provide an overview of introductory topics in psychology highlighting why the study of these topics is important. The role that psychology can play within the field of disability will be a recurrent theme. The range of topics will include emotion, sleep, learning, attitudes, memory, stress and intelligence. A diverse range of disabilities, including autistic spectrum disorders, Down's Syndrome, Fragile X and William's Syndrome, will be explored within the context of the psychological topics.

Carrie Ballantyne BSc MSc PhD Laura Sharp BSc PhD
16341 £115.00
  
 Level  
Week beginning 29 September 2014
(11 sessions) Online course
Further Info

Health psychology

This course will provide a brief overview of health psychology and its contribution to our understanding of the factors influencing health, illness and well-being. The application of health psychology in public and private industries and to various population groups will also be discovered. This course will introduce topics including stress, pain, communication, risk perception and social cognitions models. Sessions will include taught components as well as interactive discussions, group work and quizzes.

Deirdre Holly BA MSc MSc Dpsych Alyssa Gillinsky BSc MSc
16614 £115.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Monday 12 January 2015
(11 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Stress

Do you suffer from stress? This subject has become very prominent in today’s culture and has often instigated fierce debate as to its very existence. This course will investigate theories and research from a psychological aspect and by group discussion, psychological testing and questionnaires, will work towards a consensus of opinion on the subject.

Clare Caddell BA MEd PhD CPsychol
16367 £83.00
  
 Level  
13.00-16.00 Tuesday 03 March 2015
(5 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Helping children to be smart thinkers

Day/half-day Event This brief course will use a practical and interactive approach to explore how to help children and young people to be smart thinkers who can think clearly and well in whatever situation. We will explore a range of strategies that support the development of critical and creative thinking. Whether you work with kids, have your own, or simply find the mind of the child fascinating, this course will engage you and leave you keen to try out the ideas.

Margaret Kirkwood BSc MEd PhD
17036 £30.00
13.00-15.30 Wednesday 04 March 2015
(2 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Understanding drug and alcohol problems

Day/half-day Event This taster course offers students an opportunity to explore problem drug and alcohol use. During the interactive session fundamental aspects of the concept of addiction will be explored. In addition, some of the major contemporary and seminal theories used to explain the behaviour will be outlined and consideration given to interventions developed to overcome these behaviours.

Alice Russell MSc
17491 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 08 November 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Summer school: Alexander technique

This three day course will outline the history, background, and principles of the Alexander technique. The link between thinking and muscle tone, attention, concentration and balance will be introduced and body-mind connection explored. One-to-one work using the hands-on approach unique to the Alexander technique will be included each day. Enrolment limit 10.

Lynn MacDonald McLean MA MSTAT
17236 £120.00
10.00-16.00 Monday 27 July 2015
(3 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Autism throughout the lifespan

This course will take you through the lifespan of individuals with autism. It will look at differences and challenges that present themselves from infancy right through to old age. Autism varies in the degree of severity and the symptoms but it is a lifelong condition that at times, is little understood and this course will help you debunk some of those myths. Some of the psychological topics that will be consideresd include theory of mind, social cognition and movement disorders.

Carrie Ballantyne BSc MSc PhD
16336 £30.00
18.30-21.00 Tuesday 27 January 2015
(2 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Fundamentals of psychology

Scientists have studied human behaviour, cognition and development for only about 200 years, however, in that time our understanding of the human mind has undergone radical changes. This team-taught course provides insight into how psychologists study human behaviour and introduces significant early concepts and modern psychological theories. Some of the topics include psychology's history, sleep, language development, memory and practical experimental methods. Areas of psychology include biological, cognitive and developmental. You will be selected by interview for this course. A small constituent of this course requires work with number as part of the practical section.

Helena Paterson MA PhD
17562 £460.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Tuesdays from 23 September 2014 and 6 Saturdays
23 Tuesdays and 6 Saturdays Campus
Further Info

Alexander technique

Day/half-day Event This day school introduces the principles of the Alexander technique, demonstrating how to use the principles to change habit patterns in everyday movement. The course will give a perspective on how the psychophysical connection in all of us can be integrated into existing activities, with opportunity to explore practical applications. Practical uses of the technique including bending, walking, using the voice, breathing will be explored and activities tailored to the needs and interests of participants. Enrolment limit 10.

Lynn MacDonald McLean MA MSTAT
17649 £40.00
10.00-16.00 Monday 08 December 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Pschology of addictions

This course focusses on understanding what addictions are; how they are different from obsessions, compulsions and mere bad habits; how they develop and are overcome with reference to alcohol, drugs, sex, gambling, eating and other excessive behaviours in which people can become trapped.

Iain Brown MBE MA Med AFBPsS CPsychol
16371 £230.00
  
 Level  
18.00-21.00 Monday 22 September 2014
(17 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Introduction to cognitive psychology

As humans we interact with the world, think, reason and communicate with seeming effortless skill. Many of the processes that underlie these amazing feats elude our conscious mind. The study of human cognition spans how we think, how we communicate, how we remember, how we experience the world and how we reason. This course will introduce you to how psychologists have studies such complex processes and focus on how research is conducted to support the discoveries made. Credit is gained through completion of lab reports and a final exam.

Heather Cleland Woods BSc MSc PhD
17826 £230.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Thursday 25 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Psychogeography: an introduction

Interest in Psychogeography has never been higher, the term has turned up in colour supplements, lifestyle magazines, and documentaries but what is it and what does it mean? We examine the history of psychogeography and it's influence on Thomas DeQuincey throught to the Sex Pistols

Drew Mulholland
18367 £30.00
18.30-21.00 Monday 16 February 2015
(2 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Music and psychogeography

This course will open with an explanation of the theories and practices of psychogeography. Following this the practice of psychogeography will be explored with consideration of how it can influence the writing of music, and how recorded sound and the exploration of landscape can trigger involuntarily memory.

Drew Mulholland
18392 £30.00
18.30-21.00 Tuesday 12 May 2015
(2 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Science

Astronomy

Photographing the night sky, aurorae and noctilucent clouds

Day/half-day Event Looking at the night sky through a telescope can sometimes be disappointing because many of the significant objects are faint. Photography overcomes this problem and as well as describing some of the beautiful objects we will show you how to capture them on camera, and indicate how to extract the hidden detail possible. Prerequisite: None, though some basic photography and computer skills will be an advantage.

Douglas Cooper BA BSc MInstP
16372 £30.00
10.00-14.00 Saturday 08 November 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Five autumn constellations

Autumn and winter are dominated by some of the best-known and most beautiful constellations. We will take a close look at five of these, at famous and less well-known objects within them, and recall the tales they have to tell about the lives of stars and our place in the Universe.

Alexander L MacKinnon BSc PhD FRAS
16930 £55.00
19.30-21.30 Tuesday 28 October 2014
(5 meetings) Cove Sailing Club, Kilcreggan
Further Info

Planets, stars and galaxies

Astronomy is both the oldest of the sciences, and one now seeing new discoveries at a dizzying rate. Starting from the night sky and its regular changes we will take a very brief look at the organisation of our universe and discuss what sort of bodies we find in it: planets, stars and galaxies.

Alexander MacKinnon BSc PhD FRAS
16834 £55.00
14.00-16.00 Tuesday 14 October 2014
(5 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Processing your photos of the night sky

Day/half-day Event Looking at the night sky through a telescope can sometimes be disappointing because many deep sky objects are so faint. Photography overcomes the problem and this basic image processing course indicates how to maximise the detail captured in digital images using computer software. Complements "Photographing the Night Sky".

Douglas Cooper BA BSc MInstP
16362 £15.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 28 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus

Space, time, particles and the Universe

We look at several hot topics from the forefronts of fundamental science, e.g. gravitational waves; the expansion of the Universe and cosmic "inflation"; the search for the Higgs Boson; "dark energy" and "dark matter"; the quantum world.

Alexander L MacKinnon BSc PhD FRAS Norman Gray BSc PhD Kenneth Wraight BSc PhD others
16700 £88.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Monday 19 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus

Hands-on space Astronomy

This is a golden age for Astronomy, with vast quantities of leading-edge data freely available and computers to help us to use them. These possibilities will enable us to explore modern astrophysics, from the solar system to the distant galaxies. You should have a little knowledge of Astronomy, e.g. from Open Studies courses, and be able to use a PC.

Alexander L MacKinnon BSc PhD FRAS Andrew Conway BSc PhD FRAS
18002 £230.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 24 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Biology

Marine mammal field course

This course will introduce you to the diversity, behaviour and ecology of seals, whales and dolphins. We focus on learning how to identify and record the behaviour of UK species and study how they are adapted to their aquatic existence. The course includes lectures, laboratory sessions and field work on research vessels in the Firth of Clyde on the west coast of Scotland. The course is residential (full board) and is based at FSC Millport, Isle of Cumbrae. This course involves part-time and full-time students from four participating UK universities.

Dominic McCafferty BSc PhD Roslyn Anderson BSc MSc PhD
16967 £Field course cost £480 + £230 normal tuition
  
 Level  
Residential course 10 July - 17 July 2015
Residential

Introducing evolution

This course provides an introduction to biological evolution that explains the diversity of life on Earth. Firstly, we will explore the historical development of evolution through the work of Darwin, Wallace and contemporary figures such as Dawkins and Jones. Following this, the link between evolution and animal behaviour will be examined using examples from across the animal kingdom. The course will consist of talks, discussion and a museum visit.

Dominic McCafferty BSc PhD Robyn Stewart BSc
16855 £88.00
  
11.00-13.00 Tuesday 07 October 2014
(8 meetings) Campus

Introduction to evolution and ecology

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to biological evolution and ecology that explain the diversity of life on earth. You will learn how organisms evolved, how natural selection influences animal behaviour, what determines plant and animal distribution and how natural ecosystems function. We will study a range of species and different habitats through illustrated lectures and discussion. In Semester 1 there will be two Saturday study days (am only) and in Semester 2 one Saturday (full day) zoo visit.

Dominic McCafferty BSc PhD Donald Reid PhD Robyn Stewart BSc Leoni de Wert PhD Roslyn Anderson BSc MSc Phd
16837 £230.00
  
 Level  
19.00-21.00 Monday 22 September 2014
(22 meetings) Campus

Marine biology (Distance Course)

This course will introduce you to the basic principles that rule life in the sea and to the biodiversity of marine environments. It is a ten-week distance study course followed by a one-week residential field course (11-15 May 2015) at the Field Studies Council Millport centre, Isle of Cumbrae. The course will be taught by providing lectures and learning resources on the WWW with weekly on-line group tutorials. The field course will put theory into practice and emphasis will be on identifying marine species and studying local habitats.

Tony Robertson BSc PhD Dominic McCafferty BSc PhD
17502 £Field cost £320 + CertHE Fee £230
  
 Level  
Week beginning 12 January 2015
Off-Campus
Further Info

Identification of wild plants

This course teaches you how to identify wild plants that grow in the Glasgow area. The first five weeks will be indoors looking at the main diagnostic features used for identifying wild flowers. This will be followed by visits to five local sites to look at plants and their habitats. The course will interest anyone who wishes to improve their knowledge of botany as well as teachers or countryside rangers involved in environmental education.

Keith Watson BSc MSc
17915 £110.00
  
19.00-21.00 Tuesday 17 March 2015
(10 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Introduction to animal welfare

Animals play many different roles in our society, from food source to research tool to companion. In this six week course, we will introduce participants to the scientific and ethical concepts underpinning animal welfare. We will explore how welfare is assessed and improved through research, illustrated by a selection of studies. Through discussion, we will develop an understanding of the different perspectives on the acceptability of animal use.

Dorothy McKeegan BSc PhD Katherine Herborn BA MRes PhD
18384 £66.00
19.00-21.00 Wednesday 21 January 2015
(6 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Introducing ecology

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the principles of ecology. How plant and animal populations along with climate and landscape create unique eco systems. We will discuss the physical and biological factors that influence the distribution and population size of organisms. Drawing on examples from eco systems in Scotland the course will explore the concept of biodiversity, how it can be measured and importantly why it should be conserved. The course will be taught through talks, discussion and museum visit.

Leoni de Wert BSc PhD Donald Reid BSc PhD
18433 £88.00
  
11.00-13.00 Tuesday 20 January 2015
(8 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Animal welfare

Day/half-day Event We interact with animals in our society in wide range of contexts, many of which give rise to welfare concerns. In this one day course we will introduce participants to the topic of animal welfare and provide them with an understanding of key underpinning scientific and ethical concepts. Welfare issues relating to different forms of animal use will be outlined, and there will be time for discussion of different perspectives on their acceptability. We will explain the aims, approaches and limitations of welfare research and highlight these in current work via a selection of ongoing studies in animal welfare presented by researchers working in this field.

Dominic McCafferty BSc PhD Katherine Herborn BA MRes PhD Ruedi Nager PhD Paul Jerem BSc Mres
18481 £FREE
10.00-13.00 Saturday 15 November 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Earth Science

Introducing geology

Geology is the study of our planet, Earth. Earthquakes, volcanoes, climate, rivers, glaciers and life have all shaped the Earth during its 4.5 billion year history. We will examine these processes with examples from around the globe and you will get to explore the intricate and beautiful world of rocks, minerals and fossils. Scotland has some of the most diverse and accessible geology in the world, and you will see many examples in our classes. By the end of the course you should have acheived the basic skills to start exploring geology yourself!

Simon Cuthbert BSc PhD
16668 £110.00
  
19.30-21.30 Tuesday 30 September 2014
(10 meetings) Campus
Further Info

The geology of Mars

Day/half-day Event An introduction to the geology of this fascinating planet, suitable for those with at least a little experience of geology or astronomy who wish to expand their knowledge of planetary science. We will explore the diverse surface terrains of the Red Planet, look in detail at some of its rocks and try to find out what stories they have to tell. You will see how geology is being explored right now on the surface of Mars and try out some investigations of your own. Finally, we will consider whether Mars has, or ever had, the conditions to support life.

Simon Cuthbert BSc PhD
16699 £30.00
09.30-16.30 Saturday 07 February 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Introduction to the composition and structure of the Earth

A study will be made of scientific evidence for present-day models of the Earth’s evolution and internal structure and how this complements geological evidence for the theory of plate tectonics. The nature of internal processes will be investigated through the study of rocks and minerals, volcanic activity, earthquakes, structural forms and metamorphism. Processes including erosion, transportation and deposition of sediments will be examined in a wide variety of surface environments and note taken of the role of palaeontology in geology. Students should acquire basic skills in identification of rocks and minerals in the laboratory and in the field. Together with: Evolution of the earth, life and environments (offered next session), these two courses cover the complete syllabus of level 1 Earth Science.

Ben Doody BSc PhD Gordon Curry BA (Mod) PhD DIC Margaret Donnelly BSc SCST Simon J Cuthbert BSc PhD
16404 £230.00
  
 Level  
19.30-21.30 Wednesday 24 September 2014
(22 meetings)

Geology in the field

Field studies and examining rocks in the field are the basis of all geology. We will examine the geology and geomorphology of a series of areas within easy reach of Glasgow. Following an introductory meeting when plans and venues will be discussed, there will be five full-day excursions by private car. Walking will generally be easy, and no prior knowledge of geology needed.

Mike Keen BSc PhD James G MacDonald BSc PhD Alistair McGowan PhD Iain Allison BSc PhD
17210 £130.00
  
10.00-13.00 Wednesday 22 April 2015
(6 meetings) Campus

Geology around the Mediterranean

Most of us have been to the Mediterranean region on holiday and seen its rocks and even volcanoes. Now is a chance to learn something about its geological evolution from part of Gondwana, to the Tethys Ocean, its closure, and Alpine mountain building. Along the way we will study characteristic rocks, minerals, and fossils. Students will also be able to suggest areas for study.

Mike Keen BSc PhD
17055 £198.00
  
14.00-16.00 Thursday 09 October 2014
(18 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Exploring the Earth's interior

Day/half-day Event This course provides an overview of the techniques used to investigate the Earth's interior, and a summary of the current state of knowledge about processes deep within the Earth that have a direct impact at the surface (including earthquakes, volcanoes, plate tectonics, natural resources). It will include practical work investigating how geophysical techniques are used to determine the location of earthquakes.

Gordon Curry BA (Mod) PhD DIC
16380 £30.00
10.00-16.00 Saturday 08 November 2014
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Sociology

Understanding disability and society

During this course participants will engage with the key issues surrounding disability within society. This will be achieved by examining how disability is explained by key sociological theorists. Bourdieu's contribution will be considered exploring his concepts of symbollic violence and habitus and also Goffman's focus on stigmatisation. Current disability research will be explored along with how a move towards a participatory approach to disability research would be beneficial.

Caroline Jarvis BSc MSc
17217 £30.00
18.30-21.00 Tuesday 26 May 2015
(2 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Why gender still matters

Is feminism a dirty word? Is feminism dead ? Have all the battles been won? These are questions commonly found in today’s media. This introductory sociology class will explore these through the history of feminism and gender inequality. We will then look at how relevant feminism is in the 21st century. Why not join us and be part of this conversation?

Julia Young BSc
18069 £30.00
18.30-21.00 Tuesday 17 February 2015
(2 meetings) Campus
Further Info

Special Events

Planning for your retirement, what to think about to have a good retirement income - an introduction

Day/half-day Event This is a general interest course suitable for those starting to think about their retirement plan AND their families, wishing to have some knowledge of what is meant by the ideas: final salary, money purchase, annuities, open market etc plus alternative plans like ISAs etc. Thus giving them the opportunity to gain some insight into this area before speaking to a financial adviser.

Robert Davidson BA (Hons) MSc PgC FHEA
18432 £45.00
10.00-13.00 Saturday 24 January 2015
(1 meeting) Campus
Further Info

Search courses:

with subject:

location:

title containing the text:

starting:

on day of week:

with tutor:

start month: