History 2AM: Society, Culture & Politics In North America HIST2002

  • Academic Session: 2015-16
  • School: School of Humanities
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 2 (SCQF level 8)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes

Short Description

The American History Level 2 course will concentrate on several fundamentally significant eras and themes in the history of the portion of North America that became the United States, covering the period from first contact between Native Americans and Europeans in 1492 to the present.

Timetable

This class is taught as per the scheduling on My Campus

Requirements of Entry

Grade D or better in any ONE level 1 course in History or Economic and Social History

Assessment

Examination 60% (held at end of course), essay 20%, assessed seminar paper 10%, overall seminar contribution 10%.

Main Assessment In: December

Course Aims

To familiarise you with fundamentally significant eras and themes in the history of the portion of North America that became the United States, covering the period between first contact between Native Americans and Europeans in 1492 and the present; to improve your critical and evaluative skills in the handling of a variety of primary and secondary sources, enabling you to proceed with confidence to Honours; to enhance your independence of judgment in dealing with conflicting interpretations of major issues; to improve your presentational and analytical skills through seminar reports and discussion.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

On completion of the module you will be expected: to be able to describe the development of the English and British colonies in North America, their path to independence, and the nature of the American republic; to be able to discuss the development of the United States from a small and weak nation into a superpower: including analysis of the values and objectives that have informed American policies and objectives; to be able to analyse the role of race in American history; encompassing relations between whites and indians, the development of racial slavery, the move toward civil rights and equality, and the place of other racial groups such as Latino Americans; to be able to distinguish historical narrative from historical interpretation, and to appreciate the function of each; to be able to construct a coherent historical argument based on an appropriate selection of evidence and on an evaluation of the validity of alternative interpretations; to be able to present such an argument convincingly and clearly.