Guth Nam Ban 1450-1750 GAELIC4008

  • Academic Session: 2014-15
  • School: School of Humanities
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 4 (SCQF level 10)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: No

Course Aims

The aims of this module are: to deepen students' understanding of the Gaelic literary tradition from the 16th to the 19th centuries, by identifying some of its homogeneous characteristics and distinctive strands; to highlight the contribution of women to the development of Gaelic poetry and song; to develop students' analytical and interpretative skills in regard to linguistic and literary registers of the 16th to 19th centuries; to develop students' literary critical skills.

Timetable

Class will meet twice weekly for ten weeks

Assessment

The mark for this module will be determined on the following basis: 25% from contributions and seminars (5% general preparation and contribution, 5% individual presentation of seminar, 15% written summary of seminar presentation); 25% from written assignment essay; 50% from two-hour degree examination.

Main Assessment In: April/May

Course Aims

The aims of this module are: to deepen students' understanding of the Gaelic literary tradition from the 16th to the 19th centuries, by identifying some of its homogeneous characteristics and distinctive strands; to highlight the contribution of women to the development of Gaelic poetry and song; to develop students' analytical and interpretative skills in regard to linguistic and literary registers of the 16th to 19th centuries; to develop students' literary critical skills.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

On completion of this module the students should be able to: discuss in detail the distinctive features of the folksong tradition and its points of overlap with the male literary tradition; identify the main characteristics of the work of specific women poets from the 16th to 19th centuries, with reference to their literary and socio-historical contexts; discuss the value of the texts studied as sources of social history; identify the varied musical traditions associated with the texts studied.