10% Alumni PhD Fee Discount

10% Alumni PhD Fee Discount

The College of Social Sciences is offering a 10% discount to former University of Glasgow graduates (Alumni) wishing to pursue a Postgraduate Research Degree in the College.

This discount will be for all Postgraduate Research Students (PhD, EdD, MPhil by Research & MLitt) full and part-time, who have previously completed an Undergraduate or Postgraduate Degree at the University of Glasgow.

The discount will apply for the full term of study, excluding any thesis pending period.

There is no restriction on the period of time between completion of the current award and enrolling on a the Postgraduate Research Degree Programme.

To be granted this discount you must indicate when applying for admission that you are a University of Glasgow graduate.

Researching Multilingually at the Borders of Language, the Body, Law, and the State

Researching Multilingually at the Borders of Language, the Body, Law, and the State

Proposed PhD Studentship Title: “Silence as an integration strategy?”

Studentship Package

Each studentship is tenable for three years of full-time study, and offers the following financial support package:

  • An annual stipend at RCUK rates for three years (full time)
    (see rates at http://www.rcuk.ac.uk/skills/training/);
  • Fee waiver from the College of Social Sciences for three years (full time);
  • Access to research training support funds, including conference and travel support.

Successful applicants will possess:

  • a first-class or 2:1 undergraduate degree in Law or related discipline*;
  • an LLM/MSc (completed or in progress) in a relevant subject area; or relevant equivalent qualification and experience is desirable but not essential;
  • an outstanding academic record and research potential.
    *Exceptional candidates possessing an undergraduate degree with lower classification but who have equivalent relevant professional and academic experience may be considered.

Eligibility

We are looking for an applicant who has an outstanding academic pedigree and research potential, such as through the publication of journal articles and other publications. Applications are considered according to their academic merit. Factors such as financial status and nationality are not taken into account. 

Awards can be held on a full-time basis only over three years. The successful candidate is expected to complete the doctoral research within three years. They are required to be based in the School of Law, University of Glasgow during this period to benefit from the support and networking offered by the large grant project.

It would be of benefit to the candidate to have one or more European languages.

The studentship is not available for

How to Apply

Please provide the following documentation to apply:

  • Current CV;
  • Two academic references;
  • Transcripts of your previous degree(s);
  • English Language certificate. Applicants whose first language is not English are required to include evidence of their English Language ability, this should be a minimum IELTS score of 7.0 with no sub test less than 6.5 or equivalent.;
  • A proposal of maximum 1500 words, describing a self-standing project. It should show how it would contribute to Case Study 2’s work within the Researching Multilingually project (see Project Topic below).

Send all application documents including references in one email to Sarah Craig (sarah.craig@glasgow.ac.uk) & Karin Zwaan (k.zwaan@jur.ru.nl)
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONSFriday 29 April 2016 (5pm GMT).

Your application for the studentship will be reviewed by the proposed supervisors, Sarah Craig (School of Law, University of Glasgow) and Karin Zwaan (Centre for Migration Law, Radboud University, Nijmegen). Sarah and Karin lead Case Study 2 “Translating Vulnerability and Silence into the Legal Process” of the Researching Multilingually project: http://researching-multilingually-at-borders.com/?page_id=812

Shortlisted applicants will be invited for interview by skype, or in person, in May 2016. Applicants will be notified whether they have been successful in late May 2016. The start date of the studentships are 1st October, 2016.

Informal queries about the studentship can be directed to Sarah Craig (sarah.craig@glasgow.ac.uk) & Karin Zwaan (k.zwaan@jur.ru.nl).

More information about the Researching Multilingually Project

This large-grant AHRC-funded project is embedded within the “Translating Cultures” theme. The theme addresses the need for understanding and communication within, between and across diverse cultures. It supports research that explores the role of translation, understood in its broadest sense, in the transmission, interpretation, transformation and sharing of languages, values, beliefs, histories and narratives.

The project brings together an international, multidisciplinary team of researchers and collaborators to work on an imaginative programme that integrates the following: (i) empirical research on translation and interpretation at different kinds of border (relating to language, the body, law, and the state); (ii) the development of theory, ethical research practices and research methodologies; and (ii) a range of creative arts projects.

The innovative project structure has the following components: (a) a Researching Multilingually and Translating Cultures (RMTC) 'hub'; (b) five original case studies (involving research in the UK and US, as well as in Bulgaria, Gaza, The Netherlands, Romania and Uganda); and (c) a Creative Arts and Translating Cultures (CATC) 'hub'. This overall structure provides for the development within a single, integrated project of new theoretical, conceptual and empirical understandings of processes and practices of translation, interpretation and representation, and also of the methodological, ethical and epistemological issues that arise when research is conducted in contexts where more than one language is used.

The studentships is embedded within this research programme. Doctoral students will be working alongside members of the team, focusing on their own project and contributing to the research and publication programme of the project.

Project Topic: Silence as an integration strategy?

Adjudicative processes typically require communication in one language only (English) and interpreters are often used. Applicants may feel silenced, or pressurised to speak. What happens when language is replaced by silence as decisions about immigration status are taken? How do interpreters, legal practitioners, decision makers – and researchers – address the issue of silence in this field, where the fundamental human rights of extremely vulnerable people are often at stake? 

Courts and tribunals have consistently required communication in adjudicative processes to take place in English. In recent years other public institutions have also adopted requirements regarding communication in English. Such developments may be portrayed as an indicator of integration, with the result that the ability to speak English/Dutch becomes a substantive condition to be met.

For people applying for leave to remain under Immigration provisions, the ability to speak English may be one of the required conditions (see UK Immigration Rules for spouses or partners). Speaking English may also be regarded as a sign of integration when applying for citizenship. When UK Courts and tribunals are considering, under the Immigration Acts, whether the public interest justifies a breach of a person’s human right to respect for private and family life, they must regard, among other considerations, the ability to speak English as being in the public interest (Nationality Immigration and Asylum Act 202 s 117).  Current policy proposals would make the ability to speak English fluently a requirement for front-line public service workers (UK Immigration Bill 2015-16 Part 7).

Such requirements have both procedural and substantive implications.

In most immigration and asylum cases, the applicant’s first language will not be English, and translation/interpretation is likely to be relied on during the adjudicative process.  The implications of such reliance for access to and participation in the adjudiative process have been the subject of research by linguists (Inghilleri, Rycroft, Pollabauer) and by social anthropologists and sociologists (Good, Gibb), and the processes of power negotiation in intercultural encounters have also been scrutinised (Piller, 2011). These procedural, linguistic barriers to participation in the process can have substantive consequences where they influence or determine whether (or not) refugee or other immigration status is granted. This project will explore such questions from an “access to justice” perspective. The methods and forums for that study will be explored with the successful candidate, but could cover immigration detention, or the overlap between immigration and criminal law and process, as well as immigration and asylum adjudication.

Substantively, the requirement to demonstrate an ability to speak English can influence, and in some cases determine, a person’s future work prospects or immigration status. The level of fluency required raises issues which concern colleagues working in the hubs and other case studies in the Researching Multilingually project. Where the ability to speak English determines a person’s future work prospects or immigration status, how is fluency to be measured? What tests will be applied? How are decisions on such matters arrived at, and their reliability and fairness ensured? 

Where the question of a person’s entitlement to stay in the UK depends on the communication between an applicant, an interpreter and an adjudicator, what are the expectations on each side? This project will explore the scope for that duty to be interpreted so that its communicative dimensions are emphasised (Hathaway, Foster). Existing procedural rules, protocols and standards at EU and national levels provide for translation and interpretation. To what extent could an emphasis on communication incorporate the role of the interpreter more fully? What would be the procedural implications of such an approach?

Participation in a judicial process requires communication, silence may be treated as prevarication, and language is under pressure.  To what extent can the human rights framework (international, European, national) be called on to assist in finding a more appropriate space for communication in such circumstances? What scope if there for equality/human rights perspectives on language and communication (e.g. on the role of the interpreter in immigration and asylum adjudication) to be developed? This project will explore the implications, from the legal perspective, of substantive English language requirements and/or of reliance on interpretation and translation in immigration contexts and procedures.

This project will develop (some of) the procedural and/or substantive issues outlined above, and the precise scope of the project will be developed in conjunction with the successful candidate. It will draw on legal standards and international, EU and UK norms and consider how they relate to the developing findings of the Researching Multilingually project. It will draw down knowledge and expertise from the wider project, and will contribute to the Researching Multilingually theme by providing knowledge and insights from a legal perspective. For example, where legal provisions specify a level of linguistic fluency, or provide for testing, interdisciplinary perspectives of the sort developed in the Researching Multilingually project are essential to the production of informed explanations of and critiques of such developments. The project will contribute to the work of Case Study 2, in particular in relation to its comparative examination of UK procedures, as outlined above, but also in relation to substantive aspects and consequences.

The project will also contribute to the wider Researching Multilingually theme in that the PhD student will have the opportunity to explore and develop methodological insights into ethnographic and narrative methods of inquiry where multiple languages are present. This part of the research is complementary to the PhD- research already being done on the topic of CS 3 (Project Topic 2: Intercultural dialogue at borders). The project will develop alongside the work of the hubs, and of CS3, and will contribute in key respects to the ongoing work of the Researching Multilingually project by providing crucial input on relevant legal and policy developments.

Supervision and support

The PhD student will be supervised by Co-I Craig and by Co-I Zwaan. The project student will receive full research training in a range of social science methods and conceptual frameworks and will join a cohort of PhD students in the College of Social Sciences and thoughout GRAMnet’s PG network who provide regular for a for discussion and presentation of work, seminars, student led conferences and publishing. Knowledge exchange and impact activities will also be part of the comparative scope of this project, with the multilingual film series and translated reading group texts generated in collaboration with GRAMNet http://gramnet.wordpress.com/. The PhD student will conduct his/her own research with its unique and specific focus. As with the other PhD student projects, this student will benefit from being part of the RMTC hub team in receiving supervisory and research training in researching multilingually. The PhD student's development is complemented by Co-I Craig's role in researcher development and synthesis of PhD projects across the entire Researching Multilingually project.

Further information:

Researching Multilingually at the Borders of Language, The Body, Law and The State

http://researching-multilingually-at-borders.com/

How to apply for a research degree at University of Glasgow

http://www.gla.ac.uk/research/opportunities/howtoapplyforaresearchdegree/

College of Social Sciences Graduate School

http://www.gla.ac.uk/colleges/socialsciences/graduateschool/

Centre for Migration Law

http://www.ru.nl/law/cmr/

Informal queries about the studentship can be directed to Sarah Craig (sarah.craig@glasgow.ac.uk) & Karin Zwaan (k.zwaan@jur.ru.nl).

China Scholarship Council Scholarships 2016-17

China Scholarship Council Scholarships 2016-17

Economic and Social Research Council and Skills Development Scotland Co-Funded PhD Studentship.

Economic and Social Research Council and Skills Development Scotland Co-Funded PhD Studentship.

Work readiness: Understanding its complexity and developing policy interventions

Background

This is a rare and exciting opportunity for a high achieving social science graduate to gain a PhD through a policy-relevant project.

Skills Development Scotland (SDS) is co-funding this PhD studentship in partnership with the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences (SGSSS) which is the Scottish Economic and Social Research Council Doctoral Training Centre (DTC).  SDS is Scotland’s national skills body tasked with developing the skills and learning system in Scotland for the benefit of individuals, organisations and society. The SGSSS-SDS Collaborative PhD Programme is an innovative research programme to provide opportunities for PhD students to undertake research on skills-related topics. The Programme is now in its fourth year of operation and supports a number of PhD students researching skills and employment issues across Scotland.

The successful candidate will be based in the Subject of Management in the Adam Smith Business School. The lead supervisor will be Dr Scott Hurrell. The Department of Management provides a vibrant and supportive intellectual environment for PhD students alongside a structured approach to their training and development (further details here). The successful candidate will be second supervised by Professor Dora Scholarios from the Department of Human Resource Management at the University of Strathclyde. This co-supervisory arrangement gives the student a valuable opportunity to participate in the activities of both Departments. The student will also have a named sponsor in SDS who will provide support for their project. There will also be opportunities to participate in activities arranged by SDS (such as networking events) and through SGSSS (such as the Business and Management pathway colloquium and the Summer School). 

The scholarship will run for 3 years from October 2016, with award details below.

Project outline

Aims

The work-readiness (or employability) of education leavers and other disadvantaged groups has long been a UK policy concern. This concern pervades, with recent Employer Skills Survey data, for example, revealing that a significant minority of Scottish employers believe those leaving education are not well prepared for work

The overall aim of this research is to establish how different stakeholders perceive work readiness for different labour market groups and how skills policy may better meet the requirements of these groups. The research will also aim to create policy that is mindful of dignity at work (e.g. by trying to avoid the risk of recasting factors such as obedience within poor quality employment as a skill). The following questions will be addressed.

  1. How is work readiness understood by different stakeholders? Does the meaning of work readiness differ between labour market groups (e.g. young workers, graduates, the unemployed, the disabled and care leavers)?
  2. What are the barriers to these different groups in developing work readiness?
  3. How can policy interventions be designed to improve work readiness in a way that meets the needs of multiple stakeholders?

Methodology

It is expected that the empirical research will comprise three phases, although the student will have input into the direction of the project:

  1. Interviews with two key groups of employers, a) those who have reported particular problems with work readiness (e.g. as identified through secondary analysis of UKCES Scottish employers’ skills survey data); and b) those who have actively engaged with employability/work readiness initiatives in Scotland (e.g. through analysing policy literature).
  2. Interviews with advocates of particular groups such as umbrella bodies (e.g. Universities Scotland) and third sector organisations (e.g. the Wise group).
  3. A purposive sample of individual worker case studies across the groups of interest, provided through the above engagement with employers and advocate groups  

Profile of the student

The candidate should have a first class or 2:1 Honours (undergraduate) degree and a Master’s degree in a social science area, with a significant research training element in both quantitative and qualitative methods. As the majority of the planned research is qualitative, an interest in using these methods is essential. We are particularly keen to receive applications from candidates with a strong social science background in subjects including, but not limited to, employment studies, economic/work sociology, work/organisational psychology, human resource management, behavioural science or economics. The student should expect to work during the PhD to improve her/his knowledge base and skill set, as required, under the guidance of the supervisory team.

Eligibility

ESRC eligibility criteria apply. Comprehensive information on eligibility requirements can be found at: http://www.esrc.ac.uk/funding-and-guidance/postgraduates/prospective-students/eligibility/index.aspx

Unfortunately, any student not meeting the ESRC eligibility criteria cannot be considered for the studentship.

The University has an ESRC ‘Award Eligibility Checker’ tool which you should use to check whether you are eligible for the award. Please include the PDF summary of your responses that it creates with your application.

The Award

The scholarship will run for a maximum of 3 years full-time commencing on October 2016 and will provide:

  • An annual maintenance grant at the RCUK full-time rate (2016/17 rate £14,296 p.a.)
  • Fees at the standard Home/EU or International rate
  • A research training support grant of £750 per annum

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to alan.mcconnell@glasgow.ac.uk by 23rd May 2016:

A cover letter

Detailing:

  1. Your research interests.
  2. A detailed course description of your Master's research training.
  3. Details of any other relevant training and skills you have.
  4. Your long-term career goals.
  5. A short statement (max 800 words) explaining how the above fit with, and can add to, the research project.

A curriculum vitae (CV).

Academic Transcript(s)

Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate).

2 references

On official headed notepaper and signed by referees.

References given to candidates in sealed envelopes should be opened, scanned and attached to the email.

Alternatively, references can also be emailed direct to alan.mcconnell@glasgow.ac.uk by referees via their official University email address; clearly labelling the reference e.g. “John Smith ESRCS-SDS Scholarship Reference”

A copy of the PDF summary generated by the ESRC Award Eligibility Checker.

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

Please direct informal enquiries to Dr Scott Hurrell (scott.hurrell@glasgow.ac.uk) or Professor Dora Scholarios (d.scholarios@strath.ac.uk)


Selection Process


Short-listed applicants will be invited to interview in Glasgow. The Interviews are expected to take place during July 2016. The successful applicant will be informed shortly after the interview.

The successful candidate will be required to complete and submit a Scottish Graduate School for Social Sciences Doctoral Training Centre Coversheet and Equal Opportunities Form.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

SGSSS-DTC ESRC Administrative Data Research Centre Studentship

SGSSS-DTC ESRC Administrative Data Research Centre Studentship

Linking housing, poverty & the labour market

Type of award:                                   ESRC Studentship (1+3 or +3 award)

Closing date for applications:          Thursday 26 May

Date for interviews:                          Tuesday 7 June

Start by:                                             1st October 2016

Applications are invited from social scientists (or those from other relevant disciplines) with an interest in pioneering the use of administrative data to examine the relationships between housing, poverty and the labour market. The successful applicant will have an interest in housing or social policy, and they will be keen to develop advanced quantitative skills particularly in the analysis of linked administrative datasets. They will need to meet the ESRC research training and residency requirements (see ‘Eligibility’ below).

The studentship provides a superb opportunity for a high quality academic training. The student will be located within Urban Studies, one of Europe’s leading centres for inter-disciplinary urban research – rated joint first in its field at the REF 2014. They will be a part of the ESRC-funded Administrative Data Research Centre for Scotland (ADRC Scotland), a research centre at the cutting edge of the exploitation of administrative data for social research. The student will also be encouraged to form links with the ESRC-funded Urban Big Data Centre, based at the University of Glasgow. The student will benefit from excellent supervisory support. Co-supervisors Professor Nick Bailey and Professor Ken Gibb have long track-records of research and policy engagement in housing and social policy fields.

Studentship award

The award is available as a ‘+3’ or ‘1+3’ studentship.Applicants can indicate which option they prefer although this can also be discussed in the interview. A ‘+3’ studentship is available to someone who has completed or is near to completing a relevant Masters qualification and therefore meets the research training requirements (see ‘Eligibility’). In this case, the student would commence work on the PhD immediately. Funding would cover three years’ fees (at the Home rate), and provide an annual stipend of £14296 (2016/17 rate) as well as £750 pa for research and training expenses.

A ‘1+3’ studentship is available to someone who has completed or is in the final year of an undergraduate degree. For the first year, the student undertakes the research training Masters degree at the University of Glasgow (the MRes in Urban Research). During this time, the award only covers fees (at the Home rate). After that, the student commences work on the three years of the PhD. For those three years, the award covers fees, and provides a stipend and an allowance for research and training expenses (details as above).

Eligibility

All applicants must have a good first degree (2.1. or higher) in the social sciences or another relevant discipline (such as statistics) or, if in the final year of an undergraduate degree, should be projected to achieve this. Applicants for a ‘+3’ award should also be able to show that they meet the ESRC’s research training requirements: successful completion of Masters-level courses in quantitative methods, in qualitative methods and in social theory for social scientists. Students due to complete a Masters programme prior to October 2016 are encouraged to apply although any award may be contingent on final results.

Applicants for a ‘+3’ award with strong quantitative skills who do not have the required Masters-level training in qualitative methods and/or social theory may be considered. In these cases, the award of the studentship will be conditional on them successfully completing agreed training during the first year of the PhD. In exceptional cases, applicants for a ‘+3’ award may be exempt from the research training requirement if they can demonstrate excellent research skills obtained through previous employment.

The studentship has residency requirements in addition to academic requirements. Funding for fees is only available to people who are ‘ordinarily resident in an EU state’ while the stipend is only payable to people who are also ‘ordinarily resident in the UK’. For further information on these requirements, please see: http://www.esrc.ac.uk/funding-and-guidance/postgraduates/prospective-students/eligibility/index.aspx

The selected candidate will need to be approved by the Scottish Graduate School Doctoral Training Centre.

How to apply

Please submit the following documents to Alan McConnell (alan.mcconnell@glasgow.ac.uk) by Thursday 26th May 2016.

For queries regarding the PhD topic or focus, please contact Nick Bailey (nick.bailey@glasgow.ac.uk) or Ken Gibb (ken.gibb@glasgow.ac.uk). For general information including suitability of existing research training or eligibility, please contact Professor Mhairi Mackenzie (mhairi.mackenzie@glasgow.ac.uk).

Background

The studentship will examine the relationships between housing, labour markets and welfare. Policy developments have combined to alter these relationships in recent years. First, there has been a long-term shift in housing subsidies from bricks-and-mortar to personal means-tested subsidies like housing benefit. The recent striking growth of private renting has also been significant. Proponents of private renting argue it provides locational choice, fostering mobility and hence improved employment outcomes. Critics argue that high costs act as a barrier to employment, while conditions can be poor and security low. Second, welfare reforms have emphasised the centrality of work while the returns from the labour market have become more unequal. In-work poverty now accounts for over half of all in poverty Third, alongside general reductions in the value of benefits for working-age households, there have been specific reductions in entitlements to housing benefit. At the same time housing costs have become less affordable, and differentially so by tenure. Fourth, spatial variations in both housing and labour markets have grown as a result of uneven economic growth and differential policies across the devolved UK.

The overall aim of the PhD is examine how housing tenure and subsidies affect labour participation and progression in work, and how these relationships vary over time and over space. It will examine the longitudinal pathways into, through and out of poverty for different kinds of households navigating limited housing, place and employment choices. It will draw conclusions about the efficacy of existing and plausible alternative policies in this space.

Data and methods

The research will be advanced by used linked administrative data – that is data on individuals created by their interaction with administrative systems such as the welfare benefits or tax systems, or housing organisations. The data will be linked to permit the tracking of (anonymised) individuals through the labour market and housing systems. This would permit pathway analysis of duration of poverty by household and housing circumstances broken down by various control variables, including local spatial data. The work may also exploit the DWP/HMRC data being linked to Understanding Society (permissions sought in Wave 5/2013-4). We envisage initially working at a Scottish level but moving in time to GB level.

Key stages

The first research activity (after literature review and associated project development and methodological work, ethical approval, and conceptual work connecting, housing, poverty and labour markets) will involve negotiation of data access and assembly of the data. This will be a challenging task but one that will add value to the work already being undertaken by ADRC-S. The second stage will involve descriptive analysis of housing and labour market outcomes as well as charting the complex web of poverty pathways that exist and conducting bi-variate analysis of these pathways with respect to key drivers like housing tenure, quality and cost, as well as household and individual characteristics and circumstances. The third stage will involve the investigation of possible natural policy experiments. Illustrative examples might include: the impact of welfare benefit cuts to local housing allowances in the private rented sector; differential policy responses to the bedroom tax between Scotland and England; regional variations in housing costs and earnings impacting on poverty outcomes.

Research training and supervision

The student will be based in Urban Studies, part of the College of Social Sciences. Urban Studies has a global reputation as a centre for innovative, interdisciplinary urban research which makes an impact. It was ranked joint 1st in its panel in the REF2014 and has a thriving community of academics and PhD students. It is home to the ESRC-funded Urban Big Data Centre, as well as having close ties to the ADRC-S. There are extensive opportunities for advanced training within the University and beyond. These include a range of advanced quantitative methods courses run by the College of Social Sciences as part of its doctoral training programme, as well as specialist courses provided by ADRC-S, UBDC and others. The successful candidate will also be part of the Scottish Graduate School in Social Science and will be able to attend the range of activities which they organise, including the annual Summer School. Students will have some funding to attend external conferences and will be encouraged to build links to wider academic and policy networks.

The successful candidate will be supervised by Bailey and Gibb jointly. There will be regular meetings with supervisors plus annual reviews of progress with the PhD convenor for Urban Studies. The student will be required to assess their wider training and skills development needs, and address these through a planned series of activities over the life of the PhD.

SGSSS-DTC ESRC and Scottish Women's Aid Collaborative Studentship

SGSSS-DTC ESRC and Scottish Women's Aid Collaborative Studentship

‘Careful calculus’ in its structural and policy context: what does it cost to leave an abusive relationship?

This studentship, funded by the ESRC through the Scottish Graduate School of the Social Sciences, is a collaboration between the University of Glasgow and Scottish Women’s Aid.  The societal costs of domestic abuse are estimated to be a significant drain on the UK public purse and considerable support is given by a myriad of public and third sector professionals to assist women to develop safe routes out of abuse relationships.  As has been long recognised, leaving an abusive relationship is a process rather than event and rather than asking the question ‘why does she not leave?, those supporting women should consider the considerable barriers that women need to overcome before leaving is a viable option. These barriers are emotional, physical, financial and, fundamentally, related to safety.  The judgement that women make on their own and on behalf of their children has been described as a ‘careful calculus’.

This studentship will focus on understanding the role and nature of financial barriers to leaving an abusive relationship and on exploring how women’s personal financial situations prior and post leaving are likely to be affected by key social security policies in Scotland and the UK.  Qualitative interviews will be used to seek women and support staff’s narratives of financial planning in making decisions about if, when and how to exit an abusive relationship; in tandem, the studentship will use quantitative techniques to model the financial impact of current and planned welfare reforms on women in different family circumstances.

The originality of this studentship lies in its engagement simultaneously with micro level financial planning and macro level politics and policies. Its results will be of interest across academic disciplines (social policy, politics, criminology, sociology) and to policymakers and practitioners. Embedded in Scottish Women’s Aid - the key third sector organisation in relation to the provision of support for women, advocacy and policy engagement – the student will have the opportunity to make a significant impact at policy and practice levels.  More detailed information can be found on the ‘Careful calculus’ Application Form.

The student will be based in Urban Studies within the School of Social & Political Sciences.  Urban Studies is a leading centre of urban, housing and broader public policy research (ranked joint first in the UK in REF 2014).  It promotes both disciplinary or inter-disciplinary research on the economic, social and governance aspects of regional, urban, neighbourhood, housing and health issues and on public policy more generally.  Supervision will be provided by Professor Mhairi Mackenzie and Dr Jon Minton (both in Urban Studies), Dr Oona Brooks from the Scottish Centre for Crime and Social Justice and Dr Marsha Scott from Scottish Women's Aid. Scottish Women’s Aid is the lead organisation in Scotland working towards the prevention of domestic abuse and playing a vital role campaigning and lobbying for effective responses to domestic abuse.

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here:
http://www.esrc.ac.uk/funding-and-guidance/postgraduates/prospective-students/eligibility/index.aspx

The Award

The scholarship is available as a +3 or a 1+3 programme depending on prior research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2016.  It includes

  • an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2016/17 rate £14296 full-time)
  • fees at the standard Home rate
  • a research support grant of £750 per annum

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to alan.mcconnell@glasgow.ac.uk by Thursday 26th May:

Academic Transcript(s)
Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate).

2 references
On official headed notepaper and signed by referees.

References given to candidates in sealed envelopes should be opened, scanned and attached to the email.

References can also be emailed direct to alan.mcconnell@glasgow.ac.uk by referees via their official University email address; clearly labelling the reference e.g. “John Smith XX Scholarship Reference”

Copy of CV

Research Proposal
Applicants are required to submit a brief 2-page document outlining their understanding of the conceptual methodological and practical challenges of working in this research area, what they would bring to the studentship, and how they meet the following criteria:

Applicants must have:

• A good first degree (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component

• Evidence of excellent oral, as well as written, communication skills

• A desire to find practical solutions to social and policy problems

Desirable qualities include:

• An interest in social justice and gender issues

• Experience of qualitative interviewing with the general public or vulnerable groups

Scottish Graduate School for Social Sciences Doctoral Training Centre Coversheet

ESRC Award Eligibility Checker Report PDF

Equal Opportunities Monitoring Form

Selection Process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 2nd June 2016. Interviews will take place on the 8th June 2016.

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

 

 

 

SGSSS-DTC ESRC and Clyde Gateway Urban Regeneration Company Collaborative Studentship

SGSSS-DTC ESRC and Clyde Gateway Urban Regeneration Company Collaborative Studentship

Regeneration for Community Health: Beyond the employability agenda in deprived neighbourhoods

Within the context of austerity, the relationship between employability and health policy agendas is changing rapidly: concern with health inequalities increasingly coexists alongside economic imperatives to reduce the number of people receiving out-of-work benefits. However, recent research highlights a challenge for the employability agenda, identifying poor health in deprived communities as a significant barrier to economic and social regeneration goals in areas of concentrated disadvantage. This is a widespread issue in many post-industrial communities across the UK. This studentship will investigate limitations of the employability agenda in relation to adults with severe / multiple health issues. Although policy interest in the health-employability relationship is growing, younger people have been the main focus, and little is yet understood about the range and depth of health issues affecting older, working-age adults. Recognising concentrated deprivation as a challenge, the research will adopt a community psychology orientation, to understand the role of institutions and social context in promoting and/or damaging individual and community wellbeing and quality of life. The experience and perspectives of working-age adults with health issues will be prioritised as fundamental to the research design and creation of appropriate policy recommendations. A range of qualitative methods will be used to generate and share new learning about how regeneration, employment, education and health policymakers and practitioners can collaborate effectively to support the needs of adults furthest from the labour market.

This studentship is based in Urban Studies at the University of Glasgow. Urban Studies is a world-leading centre for high impact, interdisciplinary urban, housing and public policy research, ranked joint first in the most recent UK Research Excellence Framework (REF) assessment. The collaborative partner, Clyde Gateway, is an award winning partnership, managing Scotland’s largest and most ambitious regeneration programme. The studentship is supported by the Scottish Graduate School of Social Science Doctoral Training Centre, the largest facilitator of funding, training and support for doctoral social science students in the UK. The 1+3 scheme provides funding for a one year research training Master's degree, linked to a three year PhD. It is designed for students who have not already completed an ESRC recognised programme of research training, in this case, a Master’s degree in Urban Research.

Further information on the project is available on the Regeneration for Community Health case for support.

Eligibility

Home/EU applicants are eligible to apply for this scholarship.

Full eligibility information:
http://www.esrc.ac.uk/funding-and-guidance/postgraduates/prospective-students/eligibility/index.aspx

The Award

The scholarship will run for up to 4 years full-time from 1st October 2016. Funding will be available on either a 1+3 or a +3 basis in the case of suitably qualified applicants and will provide:

  • an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2016/17 rate £14296 full-time)

  • fees at the standard Home/EU rate

  • a research support grant of £750 per annum

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to julie.clark@glasgow.ac.uk by Sunday 5th June:

Academic Transcript(s)
Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate).

2 references
On official headed notepaper and signed by referees.

References given to candidates in sealed envelopes should be opened, scanned and attached to the email.

References can also be emailed direct to julie.clark@glasgow.ac.uk by referees via their official University email address; clearly labelling the reference e.g. “John Smith XX Scholarship Reference”

Copy of CV

Research Application
Applicants are required to submit a 2-page document outlining their understanding of the conceptual, methodological and practical challenges of working in this research area, what they would bring to the studentship, and how they meet the following criteria:

Applicants must have:

• A good first degree (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component

• Evidence of excellent oral, as well as written, communication skills

• A desire to find practical solutions to social and policy problems

Desirable qualities include:

• Experience or working or volunteering on community-based projects

• Understanding of the challenges and tensions involved in urban regeneration

• Experience of qualitative interviewing with the general public or vulnerable groups

Scottish Graduate School for Social Sciences Doctoral Training Centre Coversheet

ESRC Award Eligibility Checker PDF Report

Equal Opportunities Monitoring Form

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Selection Process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and interviews will take place on 1st July 2016. Applicants will be notified of the decision on their application by 15th July 2016

For further information about the studentship, informal inquiries may be sent to the principal supervisor, Dr Julie Clark at:  Julie.clark@glasgow.ac.uk