10% Alumni PhD Fee Discount

10% Alumni PhD Fee Discount

The College of Social Sciences is offering a 10% discount to former University of Glasgow graduates (Alumni) wishing to pursue a Postgraduate Research Degree in the College.

This discount will be for all Postgraduate Research Students (PhD, EdD, MPhil by Research & MLitt) full and part-time, who have previously completed an Undergraduate or Postgraduate Degree at the University of Glasgow.

The discount will apply for the full term of study, excluding any thesis pending period.

There is no restriction on the period of time between completion of the current award and enrolling on a the Postgraduate Research Degree Programme.

To be granted this discount you must indicate when applying for admission that you are a University of Glasgow graduate.

'Reputation, Risk and Moral Hazard in Sovereign Debt Markets'

'Reputation, Risk and Moral Hazard in Sovereign Debt Markets'

The successful student will be part of a larger international team of academics from Scotland, Switzerland, Spain and Sweden exploring uses of the past in international economic relations. One of the many exceptional aspects of the global financial crisis of 2008 was the prominence policy‐makers and commentators gave to the importance of history in helping to determine responses to the crisis. Ben Bernanke, the Chairman of the US Federal Reserve System famously reached for his copy of Friedman and Schwartz’s seminal volume on the 1930s depression to seek inspiration (Friedman and Schwartz, 1963). Comparisons with the great depression of the 1930s feature prominently in commentaries on the depth and spread of the global financial crisis and reveal the extent to which policy‐makers seek to ‘learn’ from the past. But how relevant is the past as a guide to the present, or even the future, and how is it used when policymakers, bankers and the public are faced with difficult economic challenges?

The programme of doctoral research will focus on the European cases in socialist Eastern and Central Europe during the 1970s‐1980s; Poland, Czechoslovakia, Romania and Hungary. Perceptions of the past played a significant role in the Eastern and Central European debt crises of the 1970s‐1980s. Political considerations heavily influenced discussions about sovereign debt in Europe in this period whether the aim was to bring the two halves of Europe closer, or to merely loosen the Soviet hold on Eastern Europe. In particular, as some of the banks involved were under state control, governments prioritised historical and political reflections over economic rationales to support those countries in difficulty. Relevant archives include relevant international commercial banks as well as the IMF in Washington. This project promises a rich discussion of the overlapping economic, political, cultural and financial influences on the role of international finance in the transition from the Cold War and how interpretations of the histories of these states influenced their behaviour and position in the market.

The main objective of the programme of research is to build an understanding of how both policy‐makers and market actors use the past as a foundation for their decisions, how they create and discriminate among different interpretations of the past to fit their preconceptions and how they are conditioned by the experiences of their predecessors. Through careful archival research and case studies we also seek to trace the intergenerational transfer of interpretations of the past and how the past is used within a range of institutions across Europe. The project will therefore break new ground for our understanding of how the past is used in the context of international economic relations, particularly at times of crisis. We also hope to refresh the research agenda in economic history in the European Research Area to engage with the uses of the past.

For more information, please contact Professor Catherine R. Schenk

Eligibility

Candidates should have, or be studying for, a Master’s degree or similar postgraduate qualification (or have equivalent experience).

They should also be normally resident in the UK, Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.

EU students from other countries who have been ordinarily resident in the UK throughout the 3-year period preceding September 2016 (including for full-time education) are also eligible to apply.

All applicants must meet the Arts & Humanities Research Council Eligibility Criteria.

The scholarship is available on a full-time basis only.

The Award

The scholarship will run for a maximum of 3 years full-time commencing September 2016 and will provide:
• an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2016/17 rate £14296 full-time)
• fees at the standard Home/EU rate
• a research support grant of £750 per annum

How to Apply

All applicants should collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to catherine.schenk@glasgow.ac.uk by 12th July 2016:

Academic Transcript(s)
Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate).

2 references
On official headed notepaper and signed by referees.
References given to candidates in sealed envelopes should be opened, scanned and attached to the email.
References can also be emailed direct to catherine.schenk@glasgow.ac.uk by referees via their official University email address; clearly labelling the reference e.g. “Name, XX Scholarship Reference”

Copy of CV

Research Proposal
A brief 2-page document outlining the proposed research project.

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

Selection Process

Applications will be ranked by the project supervisor and applicants will be notified of the decision on their application by 15th July 2016.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Europe-Asia Studies PhD Scholarship

Europe-Asia Studies PhD Scholarship

Applications are invited for this prestigious three year scholarship in Central and East European Studies, School of Social and Political Sciences.

The proposed research can be in any field as long it addresses issues covered by CEES/Europe Asia Studies. This includes both contemporary and historical issues in Russia/ FSU territories or in any of the countries in central Europe.

Eligibility

Home/EU and international applicants are eligible to apply as well as students already in their first year of a University of Glasgow PhD. Both full-time and part-time students are eligible.

The Award

The scholarship will run for a maximum of 3 years full-time or 5 years part-time commencing on October 2016 and will provide:
• an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2016/17 rate £14296 full-time/£8577.60 part-time)
• fees at the standard Home/EU or International rate
• a research support grant of £750 (£450 part-time) per annum

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to richard.berry@glasgow.ac.uk by July 15th

Academic Transcript(s)
Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate).

2 references
On official headed notepaper and signed by referees.
References given to candidates in sealed envelopes should be opened, scanned and attached to the email.

References can also be emailed direct to richard.berry@glasgow.ac.uk by referees via their official University email address; clearly labelling the reference e.g. “Europe-Asia Scholarship Reference”

Copy of CV

Research Proposal
A brief 2-page document outlining the proposed research project.

Selection Process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified of the decision on their application by the end of July.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

International students should submit an online application for admission to the PhD Central & East European Studies at the same time as their scholarship application.

 

SGSSS-DTC ESRC Administrative Data Research Centre Studentship

SGSSS-DTC ESRC Administrative Data Research Centre Studentship

Linking housing, poverty & the labour market

Type of award:                                 ESRC Studentship (1+3 or +3 award)

Closing date for applications:          Thursday 28th July 2016

Date for interviews:                         Week beginning 8th August 2016

Start by:                                            1st October 2016 or 1st January 2017

Applications are invited for a PhD studentship pioneering the use of linked administrative datasets to examine the relationships between housing and the labour market. The successful applicant will have an interest in social or public policy, and they will be keen to develop quantitative research skills.

Administrative data are the records each of us leaves as a result of our interactions with a wide range of administrative systems, including those for the labour market (employment and tax), housing (property transactions, private or social rentals) or welfare (benefits), for example. Researchers can gain valuable understanding by linking data across different systems to track large numbers of (anonymized) individual cases over time. The ESRC has invested considerable resources in the Administrative Data Research Network to support this kind of research.

The studentship will be associated with the Administrative Data Research Centre for Scotland (ADRC-S). The student will be located within Urban Studies, one of Europe’s leading centres for inter-disciplinary urban research, rated joint first in its field at the REF 2014. They will benefit from excellent supervisory support from Professors Nick Bailey and Ken Gibb. The studentship therefore provides a superb opportunity for a high quality academic training which will equip the student with skills and knowledge which are in high demand.

Studentship award

The award is available as a ‘+3’ or ‘1+3’ studentship. Applicants can indicate which option they prefer although this can also be discussed in the interview. A ‘+3’ studentship is available to someone who has completed or is near to completing a relevantMasters qualification and therefore meets the research training requirements (see ‘Eligibility’). In this case, the student would commence work on the PhD immediately. Funding would cover three years’ fees (at the Home rate), and provide an annual stipend of £14,296 (2016/17 rate) as well as £750 pa for research and training expenses.

A ‘1+3’ studentship is available to someone who has graduated or just completed the final year of an undergraduate degree. For the first year, the student undertakes the research training Masters degree at the University of Glasgow (the MRes in Urban Research). During this time, the award covers fees (at the Home rate). After that, the student commences work on the three years of the PhD. For those three years, the award covers fees, and provides a stipend and an allowance for research and training expenses (details as above).

Eligibility

All applicants must have a good first degree (2.1. or higher) in the social sciences or another relevant discipline (such as statistics) or, if in the final year of an undergraduate degree, should be projected to achieve this. Applicants for a ‘+3’ award should also be able to show that they meet the ESRC’s research training requirements: successful completion of Masters-level courses in quantitative methods, in qualitative methods and in social theory for social scientists. Students still to complete their Masters programme prior in 2016 are encouraged to apply although any award may be contingent on final results.

There are important residency requirements for this studentship. Funding for fees is only available to people who are ‘ordinarily resident in an EU state’ while the stipend is only payable to people who are also ‘ordinarily resident in the UK’. For further information on these requirements, please see: http://www.esrc.ac.uk/funding-and-guidance/postgraduates/prospective-students/eligibility/index.aspx .

The selected candidate will need to be approved by the Scottish Graduate School Doctoral Training Centre before being awarded the studentship.

How to apply

Please submit the following documents to Nick Bailey (nick.bailey@glasgow.ac.uk) by Thursday 26th May 2016.

For queries regarding the PhD topic or focus, please contact Nick Bailey (nick.bailey@glasgow.ac.uk) or Ken Gibb (ken.gibb@glasgow.ac.uk). For general information including suitability of existing research training or eligibility, please contact Professor Mhairi Mackenzie (mhairi.mackenzie@glasgow.ac.uk).

Background

The studentship will examine the relationships between housing, labour markets and welfare outcomes. Various developments have combined to alter these relationships in recent years. First, there has been a long-term shift in housing subsidies from bricks-and-mortar to personal means-tested subsidies like housing benefit. The recent growth of private renting has also been significant. Proponents of private renting argue it provides locational choice, fostering mobility and hence improved employment outcomes. Critics argue that high costs act as a barrier to employment, while conditions can be poor and security low.
Second, there are on-going changes in the labour market. Welfare reforms have increased incentives to work and placed limits on welfare benefits for those unemployed, while the returns from paid work have become more unequal. In-work poverty now accounts for over half of all in poverty. Third, alongside general reductions in the value of benefits for working-age households, there have been specific reductions in entitlements to housing benefit. At the same time housing costs have become less affordable, with substantial spatial variations across the UK.
The overall aim of the PhDis examine how housing tenure and subsidies affect labour participation and progression in work, and how these relationships vary over time and over space.

Data and methods

The research will be based primarily on the use of linked administrative datasets – that is data on individuals created by their interaction with administrative systems such as the welfare benefits or tax systems, or with housing organisations. The data will be linked to permit the tracking of (anonymised) individuals through the labour market and housing systems. The work may also exploit the administrative data being linked to the longitudinal survey, Understanding Society. Where possible, the analysis will exploit variations in policies which exist in different parts of the UK in order to understand the impacts of policy interventions.

Research training and supervision

The student will be based in Urban Studies, part of the College of Social Sciences. Urban Studies has a global reputation as a centre for interdisciplinary urban research which makes an impact. It was ranked joint 1st in its panel in the REF2014 and has a thriving community of academics and PhD students. It is home to the ESRC-funded Urban Big Data Centre, as well as having close ties to the ADRC-S. There are extensive opportunities for advanced training within the University and beyond. These include a range of advanced quantitative methods courses run by the College as part of its doctoral training programme, as well as specialist courses provided by ADRC-S, UBDC and others. The successful candidate will also be part of the Scottish Graduate School in Social Science and will be able to attend the range of activities which they organise, including the annual Summer School. Students will have funding to attend external conferences and will be encouraged to build links to wider academic and policy networks.
The successful candidate will be supervised by Bailey and Gibb jointly. There will be regular meetings with supervisors plus annual reviews of progress with the PhD convenor for Urban Studies. The student will be required to assess their wider training and skills development needs, and address these through a planned series of activities over the life of the PhD.