10% Alumni PhD Fee Discount

10% Alumni PhD Fee Discount

The College of Social Sciences is offering a 10% discount to former University of Glasgow graduates (Alumni) wishing to pursue a Postgraduate Research Degree in the College.

This discount will be for all Postgraduate Research Students (PhD, EdD, MPhil by Research & MLitt) full and part-time, who have previously completed an Undergraduate or Postgraduate Degree at the University of Glasgow.

The discount will apply for the full term of study, excluding any thesis pending period.

There is no restriction on the period of time between completion of the current award and enrolling on a the Postgraduate Research Degree Programme.

To be granted this discount you must indicate when applying for admission that you are a University of Glasgow graduate.


Dawes Trust PhD Bursaries 2015

Dawes Trust PhD Bursaries 2015

Dawes Trust PhD Bursaries

The University of Glasgow welcomes applications from prospective PhD candidates for nomination by the University for a Dawes Trust Bursary.

The objects of the Dawes Trust charity are “the fighting of crime including organised crime by the protection of people and property, the preservation of public order and the prevention and detection of crime for the public benefit.” In light of these objects, the Trustees judge it appropriate to make grants in respect of a wide range of activities, including: public protection from crime; the rehabilitation of offenders; crime prevention; research into the nature and manifestations of crime, the effectiveness of various sentences laid down by the courts and the impact on victims and offenders; as well as criminal investigation and prosecution.

The Dawes Trust Bursary scheme will be awarded to successful applicants who fulfil the following criteria:

  1. The subject of the proposed PhD research must fall within the objects of the charity as explained above
  2. The subject matter must bear on crime affecting the United Kingdom
  3. It must be relevant to criminal policy and/or criminal justice practice; and
  4. The continuation of bursaries awarded will be subject to satisfactory progress as demonstrated to the Dawes Trust trustees in June each year by a report on progress from each student and a research supervisor’s report. The latter will need to provide an assessment of the student’s work and a judgement on the likelihood of its completion for the degree.

The Award

Bursaries will run for a maximum of three years from 1st September 2015 to support full-time study, and will consist of an annual maintenance grant of £14,250; a contribution towards university fees equal to the cost of UK/EU fees for the year in question; and a contribution towards travel and research costs not exceeding £1,000.

The Trustees do not wish to restrict which nationalities of students may apply for a bursary, but will not provide additional fee funding for overseas (non EU) students.

How to Apply

There is a two stage process for applications. There is an University of Glasgow internal competition to identify a maximum of two applications to go forward for consideration by the Dawes Trust.  The deadline for application for the internal competition is 23rd March 2015; thereafter successful applications will be nominated to Dawes Trust by the University on 1st April 2015.

In order to apply, potential candidates are asked to:

  1. Submit the following documentation (attached to a single email with the subject Dawes Bursary 2015 ) to Alan.McConnell@glasgow.ac.uk
    • a letter of application, stating reasons for wishing to pursue PhD study;
    • a short abstract of the proposed PhD study  (maximum 4000 characters);
    • a research proposal for the PhD study (maximum 1200 words, excluding references);
    • a full c.v.;
    • official transcripts of previous higher education degrees;
    • two academic references on official headed notepaper and signed by referees.

The same documents can be used in support of both the scholarship and admission applications but should be submitted separately –i.e. Dawes Bursary application documents emailed to alan.mcconnell@glasgow.ac.uk and University admission application documents uploaded via the online system.

Note:  Applicants are advised to make contact with Professor Michele Burman (michele.burman@glasgow.ac.uk ) or Dr Sarah Armstrong (sarah.armstrong@glasgow.ac.uk) in advance of submission of their application in order to identify a potential PhD supervisor.

Awards will be made on a competitive basis and successful applicants will be known as Dawes Scholars.


Altona Foundation for Philosophical Research (ASFPG) Scholarship in Legal Theory

Altona Foundation for Philosophical Research (ASFPG) Scholarship in Legal Theory

This scholarship is offered to support students undertaking full-time doctoral research in legal theory at the School of Law of the University of Glasgow. The scholarship is intended to further interdisciplinary work in legal theory which engages political and social dimensions of law.

The ASGPG is an independent foundation which has its seat in Hamburg, Germany. The purpose of the Foundation is to stimulate and support research and theory including research in Applied Ethics and Law. It is expected that the successful candidate will have the opportunity to be involved in the activities of the ASFPG.

The scholarship covers fees at the Home/EU rate for three years. It does not cover maintenance costs. Applications are invited for the scholarship commencing in September 2015.

The deadline for receipt of the applications is Friday, 3 April 2015.

For informal enquiries, please contact Emilios.Christodoulidis@glasgow.ac.uk

Eligibility

Home/EU and international applicants are eligible to apply. Both full-time and part-time students are eligible.

The Award

The scholarship will run for a maximum of three years full-time or 5 years part-time commencing on September/October 2014 and will provide:

  • fees at the standard Home/EU rate

Please note the scholarship does not cover maintenance costs.

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to Susan.Holmes@glasgow.ac.uk by Friday, 3 April 2015

ASFPG Scholarship in Legal Theory Application Form

Academic Transcript(s)

Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate).

2 references

On official headed notepaper and signed by referees.

References given to candidates in sealed envelopes should be opened, scanned and attached to the email.

References can also be emailed direct to Susan.Holmes@glasgow.ac.uk by referees via their official University email address; clearly labelling the reference e.g. “John Smith XX Scholarship Reference”

Copy of CV

Research Proposal and Written work

A research proposal of no more than 1000 words, as well as a sample for their written work (not exceeding 5,000 words).

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

Selection Process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and those shortlisted will be invited for interview.  Applicants will be notified of the decision on their application by Friday, 1 April 2015.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.


Moffat Charitable Trust Scholarship

Moffat Charitable Trust Scholarship

The Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change at the University of Glasgow is a new research Centre, whose purpose is deepen our knowledge and understanding about the relationship between poverty and low educational achievement and to support the development of more equitable education systems. With the Moffat Charitable Trust’s support, we are able to offer this exciting opportunity for postgraduate PhD research with a focus on the East End of Glasgow.

Education offers people the opportunities, skills and flexibility to take a full and active role in society, and it is a significant factor in determining opportunities and income in later life. In Scotland, the negative relationship between deprivation and educational success has been well recognised, with the impact of deprivation most starkly obvious in Glasgow, which has the greatest concentration of deprived areas (35.8%) according to the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation. This impacts the educational attainment of pupils in Glasgow, which is a major factor in the life chances of many young people in the area, effectively keeping generations of people in poverty.

The Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change is determined committed to challenging inequality by conducting research needed to shape the educational policies and practices needed to instigate necessary change. The three key questions that underpin the Centre’s work are:

•           What policies and practices promote equitable education systems?
•           How and why do these policies and practices break down the link between disadvantage and low educational outcomes for young people?
•           What are the social and economic impact of policies and practices that promote equitable education?

The successful recipient of this scholarship will focus their work on aspects of these key questions and work closely with academic staff in the Centre and College of Social Sciences to generate new understanding of the relationship between socio-economic disadvantage and educational, health and wellbeing outcomes in Glasgow, with a particular focus on the East End.

Eligibility

Home/EU and international applicants are eligible to apply as well as students already in their first year of a University of Glasgow PhD. Both full-time and part-time students are eligible.

The Award

The scholarship will run for a maximum of three years full-time or 5 years part-time commencing in September 2015 or as soon as possible thereafter and will provide:

  • an annual bursary equivalent to the RCUK rate – £14,002 for 2014/15
  • fees at the standard Home/EU rate
  • a research support grant of £750 (£375 part-time) per annum

For further information/ informal conversation about this opportunity please contact:

Professor Christopher Chapman chris.chapman@glasgow.ac.uk

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to alan.mcconnell@glasgow.ac.uk by 31st March 2015:

Academic Transcript(s)

Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate).

2 references

On official headed notepaper and signed by referees.

References given to candidates in sealed envelopes should be opened, scanned and attached to the email.

References can also be emailed direct to alan.mcconnell@glasgow.ac.uk by referees via their official University email address; clearly labelling the reference e.g. “John Smith XX Scholarship Reference”

Copy of CV

Research Proposal
A brief 2-page document outlining the proposed research project.

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

Selection Process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified of the decision on their application by 30th April 2015.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.


Dame Barbara Kelly Fellowship

Dame Barbara Kelly Fellowship

Delivering supportive, palliative and end of life care to rural communities: the case of Dumfries and Galloway

This Fellowship has been awarded by the Crichton Foundation in recognition of the ongoing contribution made by Dame Barbara Kelly to the development of further and higher education on the Crichton Campus, Dumfries.  It is now open to applications.

The Fellowship provides funding for fees, living costs and research expenses for a student to undertake work for the degree of PhD, for up to 36 months full time or 72 months part time. The PhD supervisor will be Professor David Clark, School of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Glasgow, Dumfries.

The focus of the Fellowship and the resulting doctoral study is closely defined (see Appendix 1), but the key research questions, methods and overall approach are open to full development by the successful candidate, in consultation with Professor Clark.

Eligibility

Home/EU applicants are eligible to apply. Both full-time and part-time students are eligible. The successful candidate will be expected to reside in Dumfries and Galloway for the duration of the study.

The Award

The Fellowship  will run for a maximum of 36 months or 72 months part-time commencing in September/October 2015 and will provide:

  • an annual bursary equivalent to the RCUK rate [ £13,863 (£6931.50 part-time) for 2014/15]
  • fees at the standard Home/EU  rate
  • a research support grant of at least £1,000 (£500 part-time) per annum

How to Apply

Interested applicants are welcome to make informal enquiries in the first instance by email to Professor David Clark – david.clark.2@glasgow.ac.uk

All applicants should then complete and collate the following documentation and attach it to a single email and send to alan.mcconnell@glasgow.ac.uk by 28 February 2015

Academic Transcript(s)

Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate).

2 references

On official headed notepaper and signed by referees.

References given to candidates in sealed envelopes should be opened, scanned and attached to the email.

References can also be emailed direct to alan.mcconnell@glasgow.ac.uk by referees via their official University email address; clearly labelling the reference e.g. “John Smith XX Scholarship Reference”

Copy of CV

Research Proposal
A brief 2-page document outlining how you would address the proposed research project.

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

Selection Process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified of the decision on their application by 31 March 2015.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  The successful applicant will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Appendix 1

Dame Barbara Kelly Fellowship

Professor David Clark

Delivering supportive, palliative and end of life care to rural communities: the case of Dumfries and Galloway

Background

Across Dumfries and Galloway there are people with a variety of health and social problems of a kind that can be ameliorated by person-centred care organised through services where the main goals are to reduce the burden of illness, improve quality of life and promote resilience. These goals assume particular salience in the face of life-threatening and progressive disease, and are especially relevant at the end of life.  Each year there are c1,000 new cases of cancer in the region and  c1800 people die (48% in hospital and only 23% at home).  On any one day in the Dumfries and Galloway Royal Infirmary 29% of the patients are in the last year of life and 9% of the patients will die on their current admission. At the same time the population of the region is ageing and demand for services is set to grow.

Dumfries and Galloway is fortunate to have a cancer support and information service, a specialist multi-disciplinary in-patient palliative care unit, specialist services for older people and a growing expertise in the care of those with dementia. But in a large rural area of dispersed population there is also considerable need for community-based services to deliver care closer to home, and to provide the benefits of holistic care – physical, social, psychological and spiritual – in more familiar and local environments.  The integration of health and social care across Scotland from 2016 along with the opening of the new Dumfries and Galloway Hospital in 2018 provide many opportunities to think about such services in new ways.

The proposed study will focus on these issues and will enable a full time postgraduate research student to:  investigate in detail the challenges we face in delivering care of this type in Dumfries and Galloway; assess areas of good practice; and make recommendations for innovation and change.

Aims

1) To produce an analysis of supportive, palliative and end of life care provision in Dumfries and Galloway that can inform service development, re-design and improvement

2) To locate this analysis within a state of the art review of international best practice, focussed on the delivery of supportive and end of life care in rural areas.

Methods

1)    Systematic review and meta-analysis of the design, delivery and known outcomes of supportive, palliative and end of life care services in rural areas, using up to date techniques of evidence synthesis

2)    Survey of the perceptions of bereaved relatives of care given in the last year of life, in Dumfries and Galloway using an established protocol (VOICES)

3)    Interviews and focus groups with Dumfries and Galloway patients and families – across diagnostic groups and stages of illness

4)    Electronic survey of views and experiences among relevant professionals

5)    Secondary analysis of existing audit and quality assurance data from local services

Outcomes

The completed study will produce:

1)    An academic thesis for presentation for the degree of PhD

2)    Related publications for the scientific and professional literature

3)    A set of recommendations to influence future practice and service development

4)    Further knowledge to add to the evidence base for supportive, palliative and end of life care in Dumfries and Galloway

Practical support and academic supervision

In March 2015 Professor Clark will begin a four year project funded by a Wellcome Trust Investigator Award concerned with the global challenges of end of life care; this will be staffed by two post-doctoral researchers, a public engagement officer and a lecturer in end of life care.

The Wellcome Trust is extremely supportive of complementary work in Dumfries and Galloway that can benefit from the environment of the main project.  This means that the Dame Barbara Kelly Fellow will have access not only to supervision by Professor Clark but also to an expert team of researchers, from which a second supervisor will also be selected

Accommodated in the Rutherford McCowan building, the Barbara Kelly Fellow will also benefit from the rich resources of data, expertise and information surrounding the main project – making for an ideal learning environment, supported within the well-established arrangements for postgraduate research at the University of Glasgow.  The successful applicant will have excellent qualifications at first degree/Masters level and will have a background in healthcare and/or social science.


MRes + PhD Economics Scholarship

MRes + PhD Economics Scholarship

The Adam Smith Business School is launching a prestigious, combined MRes/PhD Economics scheme. The 2 years MRes programme is normally followed by the 3 years PhD stage. The University of Glasgow will fund up to six studentships covering tuition fees and a stipend for up to five years to enable students to receive comprehensive MRes (pre-PhD) training and to subsequently undertake research in a chosen field of economics, leading to a PhD.

Note: Students are required to attend a 2-week introductory course in mathematical methods before commencing the MRes programme. This course starts on 7 September 2015.

Eligibility:

To be eligible, you must:

  • Hold an offer for the MRes Economics at ASBS

Country:  Scotland, England, Northern Ireland, Wales, EU, International

Level of study:

Postgraduate Taught

Value:

The scholarship will run for a maximum of 5 years. Each year's funding is conditional on successful progression and acceptance into the PhD programme and includes:

  • tuition fees at the standard Home/EU or international rate 
  • an annual bursary equivalent to the RCUK rate – £14,002 TBC for 2015/16
  • during the 3 PhD years there will be a research support grant of £750 per annum.

How to apply:

In addition to submitting an application for the MRes Economics the applicant should email economics-mres@glasgow.ac.uk stating that they wish to be considered for the scholarship and include their applicant ID.   

Deadline:

Studentships are awarded on a competitive basis.

March 2015: First round of awards

Candidates who apply for the scholarship and complete an application for the Economics MRes by 15 March will be considered for the scholarship in the second half of March. Candidates will be informed of the outcome by email by 27 March 2015.

June 2015: Second round of awards

Candidates who apply for the scholarship and complete an MRes application by 1 June will be considered in June. Candidates will be informed of the outcome by email by 17 June 2015


What Works Scotland Scholarship

What Works Scotland Scholarship

Applications are invited for an exciting new PhD studentship funded by the University of Glasgow.   The studentship will commence in September 2015 and will be based in What Works Scotland, School of Social and Political Sciences within the University of Glasgow. 

The topic of the studentship is open but will be on a subject relevant to our work.  We are particularly keen to encourage applicants seeking to explore co-production, asset based approaches or health and social care integration. The What Works Scotland Background Information document provides further information on the project for applicants. The funders invite proposals for PhD level research that will contribute to and augment other work in WWS.  Applications are sought from candidates with research interests in any set of research questions and methodological approaches and we are able to provide supervision for applicants from most social science backgrounds including sociology, education, health economics and social policy.

Funding will be available for a 3 year PhD programme.  Funding will cover fees, research expenses and an annual stipend of £14002 (tbc).

The closing date for applications is 4pm on 27th February.   Applications must be submitted electronically to the Alan McConnell: alan.mcconnell@glasgow.ac.uk.

Applications should include a What Works Scotland Scholarship Application Form, 2 references, previous degree transcripts and a 1,500 research proposal setting out the proposed areas for study, indicative research questions and proposed methods and a summary of the key areas of literature that will be critically reviewed during the PhD.

For further information please contact Professor Nick Watson, Co-Director, What Works Scotland -  nicholas.watson@glasgow.ac.uk


Urban Big Data Centre Scholarships

Urban Big Data Centre Scholarships

Urban Studies, School of Social & Political Sciences, University of Glasgow

Project titles:     
PhD 1: Rental housing in times of ‘austerity’ (Supervisor: Prof. Nick Bailey)
PhD 2: School choice and housing markets in urban Scotland (Supervisor: Keith Kintrea)
PhD 3: Transport Informatics (Supervisor: Prof. Piyushimita (Vonu) Thakuriah)

Type of Award:  Institutionally-funded +3 or 1+3 awards
Eligibility:  Home/EU or International applicants
Closing date for applications:  Monday 2nd March 2015 at 4pm
Date for interviews:  tbc
Start date:  1st October 2015

Introduction

Applications are invited for three PhD studentships to commence in October 2015. The studentships are funded by the University of Glasgow and will be based within the Urban Big Data Centre (UBDC). They offer excellent opportunities for outstanding candidates to join a world-leading interdisciplinary research group.

The UBDC is an ESRC-funded data service promoting the use of innovative methods and complex urban data to address global city challenges. It also runs a substantial and growing programme of research of its own. The studentships will play an important role in the development of the UBDC’s academic mission, conducting original theoretical, empirical and methodological work. While they focus on different topics, they share a common emphasis on developing the exploitation of diverse urban data and quantitative methods to address issues of public or policy relevance.

The UBDC is based within the Urban Studies subject, part of the School of Social & Political Sciences. Urban Studies has a global reputation as a research centre for innovative, interdisciplinary urban research which makes an impact. It is the founding home of the Urban Studies journal (along with Geography) and was ranked joint 1st in the UK out of 44 in the Architecture and Built Environment panel in the latest assessment of academic research quality (the Research Excellence Framework 2014). It has a thriving community of academics and PhD students, and the successful candidates will be encouraged to take part in and contribute to its excellent academic life.

There are extensive opportunities for advanced methods training within the University and the students will be encouraged to take advantage of these across the life of the studentships. These include a range of advanced quantitative methods courses run by the College of Social Sciences as part of its doctoral training programme, as well as specialist courses provided by the UBDC itself and others such as the wider Scottish Graduate School. Students will also have some funding to attend external conferences and will be encouraged to build links in wider academic networks.

Summary of the PhD projects

A brief summary of the topic or subject on which each PhD will focus is provided here. Applicants are asked to indicate how they would intend approaching the topic as part of their application.

PhD 1: Rental housing in times of ‘austerity’

Housing has long played a central role in the UK’s overall system of welfare, with the rental sector dominated by a variety of social housing providers who have, in general, provided relatively high quality, low cost, secure housing. This social housing stock has offset some of the negative impacts of Britain’s comparatively meagre welfare benefits system, improving welfare outcomes for a large proportion of low-income households. In recent years, however, we have seen a rapid shift in rental housing from social to private sectors, the latter characterised by higher costs, variable standards and insecurity. At the same time, welfare entitlements have been cut, particularly for those of working age. These cuts are expected to continue for several years at least. Many concerns have been raised about the potential consequences of this: for household and community stability; for housing affordability and hence ‘poverty traps’ or work (dis)incentives; and for housing consumption or quality and hence health, for example.

The overall aim of this PhD is to exploit the opportunities created by access to linked administrative datasets in order to shed light on the consequences of these changes in the UK’s rental housing system. Methodologically, the PhD will be aiming to use cutting-edge techniques in data linkage and analysis. Particular attention will be paid to causal inference. The specific direction of the research will be determined by the student’s interests and by what is learnt about data availability and quality in the initial stages. For example, it may include a focus on issues of: security or stability for households and communities; cost, affordability and access to employment; or quality, home environment and health.

PhD 2: School choice and housing markets in urban Scotland

Unequal educational outcomes (and hence unequal adult employment outcomes and life chances) are a key concern of social justice, but also relevant to important questions about the competitiveness of national economies.  While it has long been recognised that children from less advantaged households have poorer outcomes from school, there has been a more recent interest in place-based dimensions of inequality – the tendency for educational outcomes to vary between places. This became explicit in the UK under New Labour, has been continued as a policy theme by the coalition since 2010, and has also recently featured on the Scottish Government’s agenda.  To some extent the current debate – at least in England – is about the relative performance of students between different regions. Recent reports about the improvements in London school outcomes have prompted the question why performance is lagging in some other regions, particular other broadly comparable major cities. However, there has also been a growing interest in disparities in educational outcomes at a neighbourhood level which only very recently has been identified in Scotland as a policy concern. In its 2013-16 Corporate Plan Education Scotland has highlighted place-based differences in educational outcomes as a key factor in ‘holding Scotland back’ (Scottish Government, 2014), especially the strong connection between ‘poor schools’ and ‘poor places’.

The overall aim of this PhD is to exploit the opportunities created by access to linked administrative datasets in order to shed light to investigate the links between schools and the housing market in West Central Scotland. Methodologically, the PhD will be aiming to use cutting-edge techniques in data linkage and analysis. Particular attention will be paid to causal inference. Specific questions could assess the extent to which neighbourhood choice within urban housing markets is influenced by schools in terms of households seeking neighbourhoods with ‘good schools’ or avoiding neighbourhoods with ‘poor schools’; making estimates of the price premium paid for ‘good schools’,  depicting the geography of school-related housing and neighbourhood choice behaviour in West Central Scotland, identifying the household profiles of those making active school related housing market decisions, estimating the impacts on student composition on schools of school-related housing choice behaviour, and drawing out the implications for public policy on school catchment areas, planning for housing, and urban regeneration.

PhD 3: Transport Informatics

Providing access to high-quality transport services requires a variety of planning and operational innovations, as well as better understanding of travel behaviour, planning and operational processes, and the factors which affect these issues. The objective of this studentship would be to undertake quantitative research which demonstrates novel use of urban Big Data to analyse social, organisational or behavioural factors affecting transportation services and their impacts.

The major focus of the work will be on methodological innovations demonstrating the use of urban Big Data to improve planning and policy insights in transport. The specific policy topic would be determined by the interests of the student and ongoing work in UBDC. For example, substantive areas of focus could potentially include: (1) using novel sources of Big Data and associated data science methods to analyse social equity, spatial disparities and accessibility for disadvantaged communities, and to draw implications for planning and operations; (2) developing an understanding of the drivers of travel behaviour given emerging information technology solutions and assessing impacts on sustainable and healthy behaviour; (3) developing methodological solutions for dynamic resource management strategies for shared, intermodal, active and public transport, for example, regarding bicycle-sharing, car-sharing, volunteer driver services for persons with disabilities, and potentially electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

Practical details

Studentship award

For each studentship, funding is available to provide either a three-year (+3) or a four-year (1+3) award. The former will be provided for a suitable candidate who has completed advanced methods training at Masters level or has equivalent research experience. The latter will be provided for a suitable candidate who has an appropriate first degree only. In both cases, the award will cover fees (Home/EU or International), and provide an annual allowance for research or training expenses (£750 per year for the three PhD years only) as well as an annual stipend at the standard ESRC rate (for 2015/16, this is £14,002 (tbc)). The stipend will apply for all years of the studentship, including the Masters year if appropriate.

Eligibility

A demonstrable interest in and aptitude for quantitative methods is a pre-requisite for all three studentships.

Applicants for a 1+3 award need a good first degree (2.1. or higher) in the social sciences or another relevant discipline such as statistics. They should be able to demonstrate some knowledge and understanding of quantitative social research methods, as well as the desire and aptitude to develop a high level of expertise in this area. If successful, they would spend their first year undertaking the MRes in Urban Research or in Public Policy Research before embarking on the three years of the PhD.

For a +3 award, applicants need to meet the criteria for the 1+3 award and, in addition, should be able to demonstrate that they have successfully completed Masters-level courses in social theory for social scientists and in basic quantitative methods. For the housing and education topics, applicants with strong quantitative skills such as those from statistics who do not have the required training in social theory will be considered; the award of the studentship may be conditional on them successfully completing additional training during their first PhD year. For the transport studentship only, applications will also be considered from those with an engineering or computer science background. Students due to complete a Masters programme prior to October 2015 are encouraged to apply although any award may be contingent on final results. Applicants who can demonstrate excellent research skills obtained through previous employment may also be considered for the +3 award.

The studentships do not have any restrictions based on nationality or residency requirements. However, funding is unlikely to permit the appointment of International applicants to all three studentships. If the favoured candidates for all three studentships are International in terms of fee status, it will be necessary to consider fee status in addition to academic and other qualities in making the awards.

How to apply

The closing date for applications is noted above, with interviews to be held with short-listed candidates on a date to be confirmed; for overseas applicants, interviews are likely to be via Skype or similar.

All applicants should attach the following documentation to a single email and send to ubdc@glasgow.ac.uk with “PhD studentship” as the subject:

•    Urban Big Data Centre Scholarship Application Form

•    Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate if applicable).

•    Two references on official headed notepaper and signed by referees. References given to candidates in sealed envelopes should be opened, scanned and attached to the email. Alternatively, referees can email references directly to ubdc@glasgow.ac.uk from an official work email address, clearly labelling the reference e.g. “PhD studentship – Reference for [applicant name]”.

•    Research proposal: a statement of your initial views about the focus for the PhD, covering the substantive issues and key methodological considerations or challenges, and including a short indicative bibliography (strict word limit 1200 words including bibliography). Any proposal over 1200 words will not be considered. If you wish to apply for more than one studentship, please attach a separate proposal for each.

•    A curriculum vitae (CV) may be included if desired but is not necessary.

Please note, all scholarship awards are subject to candidates securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

For general information including suitability of existing research training or other experience, please contact Dr Mhairi Mackenzie, Convenor of the Doctoral Programme in Urban Studies: mhairi.mackenzie@glasgow.ac.uk.

For specific information on individual PhD topics, please contact the relevant supervisor:

PhD 1: Rental housing in times of ‘austerity’ Prof. Nick Bailey
PhD 2: School Choice and Housing Markets in Urban Scotland Keith Kintrea
PhD 3: Transport Informatics Prof. Piyushimita (Vonu) Thakuriah
 


AQMeN PhD Studentship in Urban Segregation and Inequality

AQMeN PhD Studentship in Urban Segregation and Inequality

Project title:  Urban Segregation and Inequality (Supervisor: Prof. Nick Bailey)

Type of Award:  Institutionally-funded three year (“+3”) award

Eligibility:  Home/EU or International applicants (but fees limited to Home/EU rate)

Closing date for applications:  Friday 6 March 2015 by 4pm

Date for interviews:  tbc

Start date:  1st October 2015

Introduction

Applications are invited for a fully-funded PhD studentship to commence in October 2015. The studentship will be using quantitative methods to study urban segregation and inequality. It will be based in Urban Studies, part of the School of Social & Political Sciences, and it is linked to the ESRC-funded research project, the Applied Quantitative Methods Network (AQMeN). The successful candidate with work with a team of academics based in Glasgow and other institutions who are collaborating on a range of studies of urban segregation and inequality. It offers an excellent opportunity for an outstanding candidate to join a stimulating and active research group.

About AQMeN

This studentship is funded by the University of Glasgow as part of the AQMeN research centre (www.aqmen.ac.uk). AQMeN is a multi-disciplinary research centre composed of academics from ten collaborating Universities and Research Organisations in the UK and abroad. It has been funded by the Economic and Social Research Council to develop a pioneering set of research projects which aim to improve our understanding of current social issues in the UK, and provide policy makers and practitioners with robust independent research-based evidence.

AQMeN has three primary strands of research: Crime and Victimisation (led by Professor Susan McVie, University of Edinburgh); Education and Social Stratification (led by Professor Cristina Iannelli, University of Edinburgh): and Urban Segregation and Inequality (led by Professor Gwilym Pryce, University of Sheffield). The Urban Segregation and Inequality strand involves several staff from the University of Glasgow, including: Nick Bailey and Jon Minton (Urban Studies), and Duncan Lee and Neama Dean (Maths and Statistics). There are further colleagues at the Universities of Sheffield and Bristol, as well as Duke University in the USA.

The Urban Segregation and Inequality strand has four main areas of research and this studentship will contribute to one or more of these. These areas are:

  • the measurement and classification of segregation;
  • the causes of segregation;
  • the impacts or consequences for health or life chances; and
  • the development of toolkits for policy to simulate the effects of different interventions and more generally to provide results in ways which support evidence-based decision making.

Urban Segregation and Inequality

Spatial segregation – the uneven distribution of social groups over space – is a universal characteristic of industrial and post-industrial cities. Long-standing academic debates focus on the definition and measurement of segregation as well as the underlying causes and the consequences for the individual and for society.

Applicants are invited to identify a focus for their PhD within this broad area, with a research approach based on the use of quantitative methods. To assist applicants, some alternative areas of focus are identified below. Proposals in one of these areas would be welcomed but this is not meant to constrain applicants.

The complexities of segregation in daily life

Measures of spatial segregation have become more technically sophisticated, particularly with the rise of Geographic Information Systems, but they often remain focussed on a single area of social life – namely, the residential environment. Relatively few attempts have been made to summarise the experience of segregation across the whole of daily life, capturing movement through the urban system and for different functions or activities (work, education, leisure, and so on). The over-arching question here might be the extent to which measures which capture wider aspects of daily life merely mirror those based on residential areas or, conversely, provide new insights.

The reproduction of segregation

Segregation is produced or maintained by a variety of processes. Much theory focuses on the role of migration or residential mobility, but social mobility for those who do not move may also be important. The increasing availability of longitudinal surveys and Census datasets provides the opportunity to enhance our understanding of these processes. The key question here might be about identifying the key processes by which segregation is maintained or reproduced, as well as those which may lead to change for cities as a whole and for particular neighbourhoods.

The consequences of segregation – neighbourhood effects and social mix

There has been a very active debate over the consequences of segregation in recent years. A substantial body of research has focussed on analysis of ‘neighbourhood effects’ or the idea that the social composition of the neighbourhood in which someone lives may have impacts on their welfare, life chances or other kinds of outcome. This has led to policies to promote ‘social mix’, particularly in more deprived neighbourhoods. At the same time, critics have argued that the evidence for ‘negative’ neighbourhood effects is not conclusive and indeed may be wrong, and that the policies may therefore be harmful to welfare rather than beneficial. There is scope to shed new light on this debate, taking advantage of the development of longitudinal and administrative data, and to contribute to methodological developments.

Data sources and methods

The studentship will seek to address issues of urban segregation and inequality through work with a variety of quantitative data. The initial focus will be on the exploitation of the excellent data available within Scotland although there is also scope to develop a comparative work where appropriate.

One obvious starting point for work on segregation is the various datasets which stem from the population Census, both for small areas and for individuals. The Scottish Longitudinal Study is a dataset derived from successive Censuses, providing linked data on individuals from 1991-2011. Further data on these people have been linked from health and other sources, and there is scope to link other data e.g. on employment or benefits. Given the scale and quality of this data, it has been relatively under-exploited to date.

Another source of data would be administrative systems such as the benefits, education or health systems. The Administrative Data Research Centre for Scotland has been established to improve access to this kind of data at the national level. Similarly the Urban Big Data Centre provides another service which might prove beneficial for this work through it collection of small area data or through the access it provides to administrative data from local organisations. There are links from Urban Studies to both of these initiatives – more details below.

As with the topics noted above, these suggestions are not intended to constrain the applicant. Proposals to use alterative datasets are welcome. The only fixed requirement of the PhD in methodological terms is the need to use quantitative methods. There will be strong support and encouragement for the successful applicant to develop expertise in advanced methods (see ‘Research Training’ below) – these will be dictated by the PhD topic and the student’s interests.

Urban Studies at the University of Glasgow

Urban Studies has a global reputation as a research centre for innovative, interdisciplinary urban research which makes an impact. It is the founding home of the Urban Studies journal (along with Geography) and was ranked joint 1st in the UK out of 44 in the Architecture and Built Environment panel in the latest assessment of academic research quality (the Research Excellence Framework or REF). It has a thriving community of academics and PhD students, and the successful candidates will be encouraged to take part in and contribute to its excellent academic life. It is part of the School of Social & Political Sciences.

Urban Studies is the home of the ESRC-funded Urban Big Data Centre and a number of staff also have significant roles in the ESRC-funded Administrative Data Research Centre for Scotland. These are substantial five-year investments which aim to transform academic access to Big Data, including administrative data. A substantial number of staff are engaged in research through these Centres and the successful candidate will be able to benefit from access to their knowledge and expertise.

Research training

There are extensive opportunities for advanced training within the University and beyond, and the students will be encouraged to take advantage of these across the life of the studentships. These include a range of advanced quantitative methods courses run by the College of Social Sciences as part of its doctoral training programme, as well as specialist courses provided by AQMeN or UBDC. There are many courses within Urban Studies’ postgraduate programmes in urban policy, planning and related fields which the student would be able to attend.

The successful candidate will also be part of the Scottish Graduate School in Social Science (www.socsciscotland.ac.uk) and will be able to attend the range of activities which they organise, including the annual Summer School.

Students will also have some funding to attend external conferences and will be encouraged to build links to wider academic networks.

Supervision

The successful candidate will be supervised by Professor Nick Bailey and one or two other members of academic staff, most likely those involved directly in AQMeN. There will be regular meetings with supervisors plus annual reviews of progress with the PhD convenor for Urban Studies.  

Practical details

Studentship award

Funding is available to provide a three-year (+3) award. The award will cover fees at the Home/EU rate; applicants who are regarded as “International” (essentially non-EU) in terms of fee status may still apply but will need to make up the difference in fee rates. The award will provide an annual stipend at the standard ESRC rate (for 2015/16, this is £14,002 (tbc)). It will also provide an annual allowance for research and training expenses (£750 per year) to cover travel, conferences or other expenses.

Eligibility

Applicants should have a good first degree (2.1. or higher) in the social sciences. They should be able to demonstrate some knowledge and understanding of quantitative social research methods, as well as the desire and aptitude to develop a high level of expertise in this area. They should have successfully completed Masters-level courses in social theory for social scientists and in basic quantitative methods. Students due to complete a Masters programme prior to October 2015 are encouraged to apply although any award may be contingent on final results.

Applicants who can meet the first degree requirement and who can demonstrate excellent research skills obtained through previous employment may also be considered.

How to apply

The closing date for applications is noted above. Interviews will be held with short-listed candidates on a date to be confirmed; for overseas applicants, interviews are likely to be via Skype or similar. 

All applicants should attach the following documentation to a single email and send to Alan McConnell (alan.mcconnell@glasgow.ac.uk) with “AQMEN PhD studentship” as the subject:

  • AQMEN PhD Studentship Application Form
  • Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate if applicable)
  • Two references on official headed notepaper and signed by referees. References given to candidates in sealed envelopes should be opened, scanned and attached to the email. Alternatively, referees can email references directly to alan.mcconnell@glasgow.ac.uk from an official work email address, clearly labelling the reference e.g. “PhD studentship – Reference for [applicant name]”
  • Outline research proposal for the topic on which you would like to focus, covering: the substantive issue, potential data sources, and key methodological considerations or challenges. It should include a short indicative bibliography. Strict word limit 1200 words including bibliography.
  • A curriculum vitae (CV) may be included if desired but is not necessary.

Please note, the scholarship will be awarded subject to candidates securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences. The successful applicant will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

For general information including suitability of existing research training or other experience, please contact Dr Mhairi Mackenzie, Convenor of the Doctoral Programme in Urban Studies: mhairi.mackenzie@glasgow.ac.uk. For specific information on PhD topic, please contact Prof. Nick Bailey - nick.bailey@glasgow.ac.uk.


China Scholarship Council

China Scholarship Council

The China Scholarship Council (CSC) was established in 1996 and is a non-profit institution affiliated with the Chinese Ministry of Education. The CSC provide financial assistance to those Chinese citizens wishing to study abroad and foreign citizens wishing to study in China. The objective of the CSC is to develop educational, scientific, technological, economic and trade cooperation between China and other countries. The primary function of CSC funding is to cover the living and travel costs for the students in return the agreement from host institutions to waive tuition fees. The CSC and UoG signed an agreement in 2009, the primary focus of which was to facilitate the opportunity for a select number of Chinese students to undertake PhD study at Glasgow.

Eligibility:

Eligible programmes

Energy Resources  - Environment  - Agriculture  - Manufacture  - IT  - Life Science - Nanotechnology  - Humanties and Applied Sciences  - Business  - Law

Entry criteria is dependent on whether the applicant fits the specific academic requirements determined by the host university. Applicants need not be from a partner university.

Students must apply to the host university by the 6th March and receive a bespoke letter of admission detailing that they are qualified and nominated for a CSC scholarship.

Students must hold an offer (a conditional is accepted, but NOT for language exams, applicants must have achieved the criteria for language requirements)

First year PhD students may still apply (and will receive funding from their second year onwards)

Overseas Chinese students can now apply for this scheme

Fee type:

International

China

Level of study:

Postgraduate Research

How to apply (new Students):

New students must apply to the University of Glasgow by the 6th March and receive a bespoke letter of admission detailing that they are qualified and nominated for a CSC scholarship.

When applying for admission to the University of Glasgow, please indicate clearly in the Finance section of the application that you are applying for the CSC Scholarship.

Students must hold an offer (a conditional is accepted, but NOT for language exams, applicants must have achieved the criteria for language requirements).

Students with an offer from the University of Glasgow must then apply direct to the CSC for funding.

How to apply (1st year University of Glasgow PhD Students):

First year PhD students may apply (and will receive funding from their second year onwards).  Applicants should apply direct to the CSC for funding - a list of the required documents is available on the CSC webpages.  Please contact Alan McConnell to request a letter of support for your application.

First year PhD students must also apply for the CSC scholarship through the Education Section of a Chinese Embassy in the UK.

Deadline (new Students):

6th March 2015. Our Admission team must have received your application before this date in order for you to be nominated for CSC Funding.

20th March.  After securing an offer of admission stating you are nominated for the CSC scholarship, you must apply direct to the CSC by this date.

Deadline (1st year University of Glasgow PhD Students):

6th March 2015. Contact Alan McConnell by this date in order to request a letter of support for your application.

20th March.  After securing a letter of support, you must apply direct to the CSC by this date.