Physics for Engineers

Apply now (applications close 20 April 2021)

Note that this course has two, 4-week complementary blocks. You must participate in both blocks. It is not possible to select one.

Block 1 weeks 1-4
To explore the basic ideas of physics in the areas of "mechanics, waves and optics" as a foundation for more advanced study of physics and for application in other sciences. It covers the topics of motion, Newton laws, work, energy, linear and angular momentum, rotation, equilibrium, gravitation, damped and driven oscillators, mechanical and acoustic waves, geometric and wave optics.

Block 2 weeks 5-8
To explore the basic ideas of physics in the areas of waves & optics, electricity, electronics and magnetism (using vector formalism where appropriate), and quantum phenomena as a foundation for more advanced study of physics and for application in other sciences.

Entry requirements

Entry requirements

  • GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent)
  • You should be currently enrolled at an international higher education institution
  • Competence in basic calculus as well as algebra, geometry and trigonometry is essential. We can provide you with an indicative maths skill test which will help you determine if your skillset meets the prerequisites for the course. If you want to take the test please contact the International Summer School Coordinator for a copy.

If your first language is not English, you must meet our minimum proficiency level:

  • International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training) overall score of 6.0, with no sub test less than 5.5
  • we also accept equivalent scores in other recognised qualifications such as ibTOEFL, CAE, CPE and more
  • visit eligibility

This is a guide, for further information email internationalsummerschools@glasgow.ac.uk


What will I learn?

Block 1 weeks 1-4

On completion of the course you should be able to:

  • Apply Newton’s Laws of Motion to a particle motion in a single straight line, uniform circular motion, simple harmonic motion as well as damped and driven oscillations;
  • State and apply the Conservation Laws of Energy and Momentum in linear, rotational and 2D cases;
    Apply the laws of geometrical optics to mirror and lenses;
  • Describe waves mathematically, and apply this to treat optical interference;
  • Perform laboratory experiments and present the results in a word-processed report;
  • Use a spreadsheet package to analyse laboratory results and incorporate table and graphs in a word-processed report.

Block 2 weeks 5-8

On completion of the course you should be able to:

  • Perform calculations involving electrical field and potential and describe the motion of particles in electric and magnetic fields;
  • Analyse DC circuits using Kirchhoff’s Laws;
  • Understand AC theory with reference to inductors, capacitors and resistors and be able to analysis the performance of LCR circuits;
  • Use Ampere’s and Biot-Savart’s law to determine the magnetic induction of simple conductors;
  • Describe the operation of motors and generators in relation to Faraday’s and Lenz’s laws;
  • State & understand the meaning of Maxwell Equations and its implication to EM waves in vacuum;
  • Solve simple problems using Lorentz transformation and decide when Special Relativity should be used;
  • Perform laboratory experiments and present the results in a word-processed report;
  • Use a spreadsheet package to analyse laboratory results and incorporate table and graphs in a word-processed report.

Assessment?

Block 1 weeks 1-4

  • Unseen examination (60%) 90 minutes exam paper consisting of 20 multiple-choice questions and 3 short written questions.
  • Course work consists of laboratory work (20%) and online assignments and class tests (20%).

Block 2 weeks 5-8

  • Unseen examination (60%) 90 minutes exam paper consisting of 20 multiple-choice questions and three short written questions.
  • Course work consists of laboratory work (20%) and online assignments and class tests (20%).