Dr Emma Cardwell

  • Lecturer in Human Geography (School of Geographical & Earth Sciences)

Research interests

I'm an environmental geographer with an interest in the role of epistemology in human-environment relationships. My research explores the ontological and material politics of collective knowledge practices (such as economics, chemistry, philosophy and the arts), and what these means for ecosystems and communities, and our relationships within them. I'm particularly interested in practices and organisation around food production, ecological conservation, economic transitions and environmental change.

Theoretically, I engage with the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) and feminist and anti-colonial science studies to explore how we co-create the world through our practices of collective understanding, production and survival, and what this means for our cosmopolitical existence.

I currently have three main research projects, all of which explore performative, material (and disciplinary) knowledge practices in the political economy of food production and environmental change.

The first of these looks at the role of bioeconomics in the management of marine fisheries, with a focus on the UK. Here, I explore the relationship between economic philosophy, law and the changing practices, technologies and ecosystems of fishing and the sea; and how processes of privatisation and financialisation have impacted marine life in the 21st century.

In my second research strand, I work with indigenous communities and activists in Southern Mexico to confront the 'epistemicide' of valuable agricultural knowledge practices, and the ecologies these sustain, via the developmental science-politics-finance interface of Green Revolution agriculture.

Finally, through an investigation of the role of nitrogen in crop growth, and the histories of nitrogenous fertilisers, I am interested in interrogating the role of food production techniques and organic chemistry in economic and social theory, and the relationships between biogeochemical cycles, philosophy, political economy and environmental change.

Before joining the School of Geographical and Earth Sciences in July 2018, I worked as a Research Associate in the Centre for the Study of Environmental Change in Lancaster University's Sociology Department, looking at the governance of nutrient management on UK livestock farms. I've also worked in the School of Law at the University of Bristol, exploring the social-legal aspects of the UK's transition to area-based marine conservation. Before that, I studied for an ESRC-funded DPhil in Human Geography at the University of Oxford, on the UK's transition to market-based fisheries management; an MSc in Nature, Society and Environmental Policy, also at Oxford, and a BSc in Environmental Policy at the London School of Economics.


Publications

List by: Type | Date

Jump to: 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2016 | 2015 | 2013 | 2012
Number of items: 12.

2020

Zottola, A., Atanasova, D., Cardwell, E. , Forrester, J. and Stevens, C. (2020) Framing nitrogen pollution in the British press: 1984-2018. Discourse and Communication, (Accepted for Publication)

2019

Cardwell, E. and Waterton, C. (2019) How to move beyond the dialogism of the ‘Parliament of Things’ and the ‘Hybrid Forum’ when rethinking participatory experiments with ANT. In: Blok, A., Farias, I. and Roberts, C. (eds.) The Routledge Companion to Actor-Network Theory. Routledge: Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY, pp. 378-388. ISBN 9781138084728

2018

Young, O. R. et al. (2018) Moving beyond panaceas in fisheries governance. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 115(37), pp. 9065-9073. (doi: 10.1073/pnas.1716545115) (PMID:30139919)

Appleby, T., Cardwell, E. , Pettipher, J. and Deming, J. W. (2018) Fishing rights, property rights, human rights: the problem of legal lock-in in UK fisheries. Elem Sci Anth, 6(1), 40. (doi: 10.1525/elementa.295)

2016

Pieraccini, M. and Cardwell, E. (2016) Divergent perceptions of new marine protected areas: Comparing legal consciousness in Scilly and Barra, UK. Ocean and Coastal Management, 119, pp. 21-29. (doi: 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2015.09.016)

Pieraccini, M. and Cardwell, E. (2016) Impact assessments for nature conservation. Public Law, 1, pp. 93-110.

Pieraccini, M. and Cardwell, E. (2016) Towards deliberative and pragmatic co-management: a comparison between inshore fisheries authorities in England and Scotland. Environmental Politics, 25(4), pp. 729-748. (doi: 10.1080/09644016.2015.1090372)

2015

Cardwell, E. and Thornton, T. F. (2015) The fisherly imagination: The promise of geographical approaches to marine management. Geoforum, 64, pp. 157-167. (doi: 10.1016/j.geoforum.2015.06.008)

Cardwell, E. (2015) Power and performativity in the creation of the UK fishing-rights market. Journal of Cultural Economy, 8(6), pp. 705-720. (doi: 10.1080/17530350.2015.1050441)

2013

Cardwell, E. and Gear, R. (2013) Transferable quotas, efficiency and crew ownership in Whalsay, Shetland. Marine Policy, 40, pp. 160-166. (doi: 10.1016/j.marpol.2013.01.013)

2012

Cardwell, E. J. (2012) Invisible fishermen. In: Højrup, T. and Schriewer, K. (eds.) European Fisheries at a Tipping Point = La Pesca Europea ante un Cambio Irreversible. Murcia.

Neilson, A., Cardwell, E. J. and De Bulhão Pato, C. (2012) Coastal fisheries in the Azores, Portugal - a question of sovereignty, sustainability and space. In: Højrup, T. and Schriewer, K. (eds.) European Fisheries at a Tipping Point = La Pesca Europea ante un Cambio Irreversible. Murcia.

This list was generated on Thu Apr 2 16:51:41 2020 BST.
Number of items: 12.

Articles

Zottola, A., Atanasova, D., Cardwell, E. , Forrester, J. and Stevens, C. (2020) Framing nitrogen pollution in the British press: 1984-2018. Discourse and Communication, (Accepted for Publication)

Young, O. R. et al. (2018) Moving beyond panaceas in fisheries governance. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 115(37), pp. 9065-9073. (doi: 10.1073/pnas.1716545115) (PMID:30139919)

Appleby, T., Cardwell, E. , Pettipher, J. and Deming, J. W. (2018) Fishing rights, property rights, human rights: the problem of legal lock-in in UK fisheries. Elem Sci Anth, 6(1), 40. (doi: 10.1525/elementa.295)

Pieraccini, M. and Cardwell, E. (2016) Divergent perceptions of new marine protected areas: Comparing legal consciousness in Scilly and Barra, UK. Ocean and Coastal Management, 119, pp. 21-29. (doi: 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2015.09.016)

Pieraccini, M. and Cardwell, E. (2016) Impact assessments for nature conservation. Public Law, 1, pp. 93-110.

Pieraccini, M. and Cardwell, E. (2016) Towards deliberative and pragmatic co-management: a comparison between inshore fisheries authorities in England and Scotland. Environmental Politics, 25(4), pp. 729-748. (doi: 10.1080/09644016.2015.1090372)

Cardwell, E. and Thornton, T. F. (2015) The fisherly imagination: The promise of geographical approaches to marine management. Geoforum, 64, pp. 157-167. (doi: 10.1016/j.geoforum.2015.06.008)

Cardwell, E. (2015) Power and performativity in the creation of the UK fishing-rights market. Journal of Cultural Economy, 8(6), pp. 705-720. (doi: 10.1080/17530350.2015.1050441)

Cardwell, E. and Gear, R. (2013) Transferable quotas, efficiency and crew ownership in Whalsay, Shetland. Marine Policy, 40, pp. 160-166. (doi: 10.1016/j.marpol.2013.01.013)

Book Sections

Cardwell, E. and Waterton, C. (2019) How to move beyond the dialogism of the ‘Parliament of Things’ and the ‘Hybrid Forum’ when rethinking participatory experiments with ANT. In: Blok, A., Farias, I. and Roberts, C. (eds.) The Routledge Companion to Actor-Network Theory. Routledge: Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY, pp. 378-388. ISBN 9781138084728

Cardwell, E. J. (2012) Invisible fishermen. In: Højrup, T. and Schriewer, K. (eds.) European Fisheries at a Tipping Point = La Pesca Europea ante un Cambio Irreversible. Murcia.

Neilson, A., Cardwell, E. J. and De Bulhão Pato, C. (2012) Coastal fisheries in the Azores, Portugal - a question of sovereignty, sustainability and space. In: Højrup, T. and Schriewer, K. (eds.) European Fisheries at a Tipping Point = La Pesca Europea ante un Cambio Irreversible. Murcia.

This list was generated on Thu Apr 2 16:51:41 2020 BST.

Grants

Community-led Science for Climate Adaptation: Supporting Indigenous Water Management in Chiapas and Oaxaca, Mexico

(PI; with Julia McClure, Rebecca Harrison, Anna Chadwick, John Xiaogang Shi and Deborah Dixon)

Global Challenge Research Fund, September 2019-June 2020

 

Gardens Can Grow Here: Humanitarian Place Making, Citizen Science, and Farming Expertises in Refugee Camps

(C0-I, with Lazaros Karaliotas, Deborah Dixon, Brian Barratt, Katherine Botterill, Philip Nicholson and Benjamin White)

Global Challenge Research Fund, September 2019-June 2020

 

The Language of Nitrogen

(Co-I, with Carly Stevens and Dimintrinka Atanasova, Lancaster University)

N8 Agrifood, Feb 2019 - September 2019

 

Hypermetabolic N: the social life of nitrogen in UK agroecologies

(Co-I; with Claire Waterton and Carly Stevens, Lancaster University, and Julia Cooper, Newcastle University)

N8 Agrifood, April 2018 - December 2018

 

Resilience in genetic and cultural diversity: supporting sustainable indigenous agricultures in Chiapas, Mexico

(PI; with Julia McClure, Rebecca Harrison and Ian Shaw, University of Glasgow)

Global Challenges Research Fund, October 2018 - March 2019


Supervision

Hannah Imlach

Close Encounters: art, presence and environmental engagement at Loch Lomond

(co-supervised with Hayden Lorimer and David Borthwick)

 

Dumisani Moyo

Grounding Knowledges: interrogating identity and data in agriculture through the 'decolonial turn'

(co-supervised with Deborah Dixon and Emma Laurie)

 

Amy Clarkson

Rewilding the Self: a creative-critical practice of ecological enmeshment and cultural emergence

(co-supervised with Elizabeth Reeder, David Borthwick and Hayden Lorimer)

 


Teaching

I convene a Geography honours option on Geographies of Food. In this interdisciplinary course, students critically explore the geographies, politics and ethics of what we eat, and what that means for the organisation of economies, ecologies and society. Using contributions from across the sciences, social sciences and humanities, we investigate the economic and material practices that make up the food system. 

With Larissa Naylor and Brian Barrett, I co-convene Managing Sustainable Water Environments, which is a core course on the Sustainable Water Environments MSc.

I contribute content to the Human Geography MRes on investigative research methods (particularly around finance and economics), citizen science and materialisms.

I teach undergraduate students about environment, resources, science and sustainability across the Geography degrees.