Yaxi Wang

Research Email: 2319763w@student.gla.ac.uk

Art Teaching Email: sissi_wangyaxi@yahoo.com

Research Office: Room 681, St Andrew's Building, Glasgow, G3 6NH

Research title: The Exploitation of Interpictoriality: the Visual Inter-relationship between Illustrations and Original Artworks in Children's Picturebooks

Research Summary

The Exploration of Interpictoriality: The Visual Inter-relationship between Illustrations and Original Artworks in Children's Picturebooks

 

My research interests include: interpictoriality in picturebooks; children’s aesthetical appreciation to illustrations; illustration and picturebook creation; art education.

 

The idea of words or artworks referring to other words and artworks has been adopted by artists and scholars in fine arts and literary studies for centuries. The term “interpictoriality” might be the most up-to-date and comprehensive one for representing the concept of referencing pictorial/verbal texts. Picturebook scholars have looked at subjects that cite the fine arts in picturebook illustrations and given the terminology numerous terms to identify the notion. However, I believe the range of the interpictorial references should be extended.

 

My doctoral research includes two parts. The first part focuses on exploring the nature and the categories of interpictoriality. Following Sandra Beckett, Frank Serafini, and other scholarships’ related theories, the research will have a critical discussion on interpictoriality in children’s picturebook illustrations. The second part refers to children’s responses to interpictoriality when reading picturebooks. When it comes to data collection, I have interviewed a number of experienced illustrators to acquire their understandings and insights of interpictoriality and young readers’ responses to it. With data collected, the research aims to provide some academic analysis on the topic, which serves the picturebook illustrators in the practice field to enrich their illustrating knowledge. Furthermore, the research also intends to provide academic and practical outcomes for illustration/picturebook teaching, children’s education, and other scholars and picturebook readers.   

Conference

European Network of Picturebook Research

The 7th International conference – Verbal and visual strategies in nonfiction picturebooks

 

The European Network of Picturebook Research was established during the first picturebook conference in Barcelona in September 2007. The network was proposed by Bettina Kümmerling-Meibauer (University of Tübingen, Germany) who was a member of both the reading committee and co-organizer of the Barcelona-conference, and of the core group of picturebook researchers, which includes/d Evelyn Arizpe, Nina Christensen, Teresa Colomer, Elina Druker, Maria Nikolajeva and Cecilia Silva-Díaz. Since then, biannual picturebook conferences have been held in different European countries. The conference I attended is the 7th event which took place in Bergen, Norway.

 

The conference in 2019 focuses on nonfiction picturebooks and their verbal & visual strategies. Nonfiction picturebooks have been published concurrently with fictional picturebooks for decades, if not centuries. Clearly recognized as an art form on a par with fiction picturebooks, nonfiction picturebooks have been honoured with their own category for awards at the prestigious Bologna Children's Book Fair since 1995. In spite of this, the scholarly field of picturebooks and picturebook theory have paid comparatively little attention to nonfiction picturebooks. Rather than dwelling on the reasons behind this lacuna within picturebook research, there is a need to bring together studies that attempt to remedy this deficiency, and to establish a theoretical framework or starting point for systematic and inventive approaches to various kinds of nonfiction picturebooks, both printed and digital. From pop-up books on urban development and big vehicles, to biographies about artists, adventurers, scientists, kings and queens, to graphic nonfiction on terrorism, the World Wars, and stem cells, to reference works such as atlases, encyclopaedias, ABC-books, and picture dictionaries, nonfiction picturebooks span a dizzying range of different themes, formats, and intended addressees.

 

My contribution to this conference was mainly participated in the PhD workshop and present my paper Exploring Interpictoriality: The Visual Relationship between Illustrations and Artworks in Children’s Picturebooks. During the presentation, I interpreted the research focus and argument in my paper:

 

As an artistic platform for young readers, the children’s picturebook has invoked various artistic forms to represent visual communications. Hoster Cabo, Lobato Suero, and Ruiz Campos (2019) brought the term of “interpictoriality” to the picturebook field to suggest those meaningful visual texts which are able to invite other connected images, especially artworks, in picturebook illustrations. Many scholars believe reading illustrations with interpictoriality helps children to develop their visual literacy and evoke them to explore epistemic communities, such as culture and artworld (Serafini, 2015; Beckett, 2010; Carney and Levin, 2002; Nodelman, 2018; Hoster Cabo, Lobato Suero, and Ruiz Campos, 2019). Yet few engage with the creators of picturebooks, the illustrators, to understand their perspectives and strategies to help children in learning about art through picturebook illustrations. 

 

To fully understand interpictoriality and its aesthetic significance in picturebooks, I explored picturebook theories, such as Serafini’s (2015), and have extended these through insights obtained in interviews with professional illustrators and illustration lecturers who regularly apply interpictoriality in their illustrations. By reflecting on these insights, this paper aims to examine the extent of interpictoriality in picturebook illustrations and also to discuss how children’s different levels of aesthetical awareness reflect on different forms of interpictoriality by associating existing theories with the results from the interviews. 

 

Fifteenth International Conference on the Arts in Society

Against the Grain: Arts and the Crisis of Democracy

Virtual Conference | 24–26 June 2020

 

The International Conference on the Arts in Society began in Australia in the early 2000s with three community-based events–a conference on Indigenous Visual Arts in Adelaide and then two conferences associated with the Adelaide and Melbourne Festival of the Arts. The International Conference on the Arts in Society has evolved to create an intellectual platform for the arts and arts practices and to create an interdisciplinary conversation on the role of the arts in society. It is intended as a place for critical engagement, examination, and experimentation of ideas that connect the arts to their contexts in the world on stage, in studios and theatres, in classrooms, in museums and galleries, on the streets, and in communities. The 2020 Arts in Society Conference contributes to the discourse on how the practices of art and our ways of interpreting art have shaped and is shaping society and how we present, critique, and engage with the forces defining our current understanding of the nature of and the challenges facing the future of democracy as a core organising principle of society.

 

My contribution to this conference was mainly participated in the penal of Arts Education and presented my paper Exploring Interpictoriality: The Visual Relationship between Illustrations and Artworks in Children’s Picturebooks. During the presentation, I interpreted the research focus and argument in my paper:

As an artistic platform for young readers, the children’s picturebook has invoked various artistic forms to represent visual communications. Hoster Cabo, Lobato Suero, and Ruiz Campos (2019) brought the term of “interpictoriality” to the picturebook field to suggest those meaningful visual texts which are able to invite other connected images, especially artworks, in picturebook illustrations. Many scholars believe reading illustrations with interpictoriality helps children to develop their visual literacy, and encourage them to explore epistemic communities, such as culture and artworld (Serafini, 2015; Beckett, 2010; Carney and Levin, 2002; Nodelman, 2018; Hoster Cabo, Lobato Suero, and Ruiz Campos, 2019). Yet few engage with the creators of picturebooks, the illustrators, to understand their perspectives and strategies to help children in learning about art through picturebook illustrations. To fully understand interpictoriality and its aesthetic significance in picturebooks, I explored picturebook theories, such as Serafini’s (2015), and have extended these through insights obtained in interviews with professional illustrators and illustration lecturers who regularly apply interpictoriality in their illustrations. By reflecting on these insights, this paper aims to examine the extent of interpictoriality in picturebook illustrations, and also to discuss how children’s different levels of aesthetical awareness reflect on different forms of interpictoriality by associating existing theories with the results from the interviews.

 

The link to the presentation is attached below:

Exploring Interpictoriality: The Visual Inter-relationship between Illustrations and Original Artworks in Children’s Picturebooks

https://cgscholar.com/community/community_profiles/the-arts-in-society/community_updates/121623

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Information

I received my Bachelor degree in illustration and comics from China Academic of Art in China and my Master degree with distinction in illustration and animation from Coventry University in the UK. I am now a second-year PhD student in the School of Education, University of Glasgow.  

 

As an artist and teacher for illustration, I have extensive experience in creating picturebooks. My illustrations have been published also presented in many international illustration exhibitions such as The Duet Illustration Exhibition: Journey in the United Kingdom in 2015 and the 9th, 10th, and 11th China International Illustration Animation Festival in 2013, 2015, and 2017. China Academy of Art Press has published my illustrations, Coventry Maps, Arabian Nights, and Plums Fall in its illustration and animation festivals. 

 

Since beginning my PhD, my activities have focused on the academic research of picturebook illustrations. My main area of study is interpictoriality in picturebooks and children’s aesthetical appreciation of illustrations.