Migration and Refugee Education

Migration and Refugee Education

The School of Education’s has a longstanding and sustained strand of work deriving from language education, and the use of the arts in awareness raising for refugee integration and migration that has grows out of work undertaken over 20 years in collaboration with the School of Modern Languages, importantly through the vehicle of GRAMNet co-ordinated by Alison Phipps. It relates to work funded on four occasions by the AHRC (and its precursors), the British Academy and Leverhulme Foundation investigating the place of and performance of multilingualism in varieties of integration. Most recently the major AHRC project, Researching Multilingually, has provided the basis for the UNESCO Chair in Refugee Integration through Languages and the Arts held by Professor Phipps.

Related work led by Evelyn Aripze and Julie McAdam concerns the development of visual, multilingual, emotional, critical and digital literacies using multimodal texts that are crucial for understanding and developing migrant children’s and young adult’s meaning-making and intercultural competences in the global 21st century.  See, for example, our ‘Reading Changes’ bilingual blog. We have worked internationally with children from migrant communities and published an award-winning book. We also conducted research for the award- winning project with EAL children in Scottish classrooms

Work within an AHRC/ESRC funded GCRF Forced Displacement project, Building Futures: Aspirations of Syrian Youth Refugees and Host Population Responses in Lebanon, Greece and the UK, involving Lesley Doyle Kristinn Hermannsson as a Co-investigator also links to our concern with skills development and focused on displaced Syrians in the Lebanon, Greece and the UK. Bonnie Slade has led a British Academy funded project concerned migrating medical professional knowledge. Marta Moskal has been the Co-I on an ESRC funded project concerned with identity, citizenship and belonging among settled Eastern European migrant children in the UK