SCMH research shows that people who cycle to work have a higher risk of injury, but the benefits offset this risk.

Dr Paul Welsh, Dr Claire Welsh and Dr Carlos Celis have led a research paper published in the British Medical Journal. The new study shows commuters who cycle to work are at higher risk of injury compared to those who walk, use a car or take public transport; However, the risk of injury is counterbalanced by the lower risk of cancers, heart disease and deaths seen in cyclist.


“Association of injury related hospital admissions with commuting by bicycle in the UK: prospective population based study” was published in BMJ on 11 March 2020 and gained a high altimetric score.

Image of Paul March 2020 cycle altmetric

Image of Paul March 2020 paper

The study also received excellent media coverage and continues to generate important discussions around cycling on social media.

See the links to the various media outlets below

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/03/11/cycling-commuters-nearly-50-per-cent-likely-injured-study-finds/
Daily Telegraph - 12/03/2020

CYCLING to work may help you lose weight, get some fresh air and save money on the daily commute.

https://www.scotsman.com/news/transport/cycling-commuters-need-more-protection-roads-according-recent-study-2447549
The Scotsman - 12/03/2020

More must be done to protect cycling commuters, researchers have said, after a new study examined the risks and benefits of travelling to work by bike.

Cycling to work cuts your risk of dying by a fifth - even with the chance of being knocked of your bike! (Web)
Daily Mail - 12/03/2020

Risks versus benefits of commuting by bike assessed (Web)
AOL UK - 12/03/2020
(Note: this story originated from Press Association and appeared across multiple news websites).

Biking to work appears more dangerous than other commuting options, study finds (Web)
CNN - 12/03/2020
(Note: this story originated from CNN and appeared across multiple news websites).

Risks, benefits weighed of biking to work (Web)
Canberra Times - 12/03/2020
(Note: this story originated from Australian Associated Press and appeared across multiple news websites).

STV Central East 12 March 2020 07:14:58
STV Central East - 12/03/2020 07:14:58
Cyclists are 45 per cent more likely to be injured on their route to work than those travelling by bus or car, according to research from Glasgow University.

BBC Radio Scotland 12 March 2020 06:32:39
BBC Radio Scotland - 12/03/2020 06:32:39
People in the UK who cycle to work are believed to be far more likely to get hurt than those who commute by car or bus. But research from the University of Glasgow also suggests that there are lower risk of heart disease, cancer and premature death. Includes interview with Dr Paul Welsh.

LBC News 1152 (London) 12 March 2020 06:10:50
LBC News 1152 (London) - 12/03/2020 06:10:50
Latest research suggests the risk of getting injured on the way into work is putting commuters off cycling. Includes interview with Dr Paul Welsh of Glasgow University.

BBC Radio Sheffield 12 March 2020 06:04:24
BBC Radio Sheffield - 12/03/2020 06:04:24
It is claimed that cycling to work, despite the health benefits, puts you at a greater risk of getting hurt than using the car or public transport. Includes interview with Dr Paul Welsh of Glasgow University.

BBC Radio Cornwall 12 March 2020 06:02:59
BBC Radio Cornwall - 12/03/2020 06:02:59
New research about the risks of cycling to work has been published. Includes interview with Dr Paul Welsh of Glasgow University.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/03/11/cycling-commuters-nearly-50-per-cent-likely-injured-study-finds/
Daily Telegraph - 12/03/2020

CYCLING to work may help you lose weight, get some fresh air and save money on the daily commute.

https://www.scotsman.com/news/transport/cycling-commuters-need-more-protection-roads-according-recent-study-2447549
The Scotsman - 12/03/2020

More must be done to protect cycling commuters, researchers have said, after a new study examined the risks and benefits of travelling to work by bike.

Cycling to work cuts your risk of dying by a fifth - even with the chance of being knocked of your bike! (Web)
Daily Mail - 12/03/2020

Risks versus benefits of commuting by bike assessed (Web)
AOL UK - 12/03/2020
(Note: this story originated from Press Association and appeared across multiple news websites).

Biking to work appears more dangerous than other commuting options, study finds (Web)
CNN - 12/03/2020
(Note: this story originated from CNN and appeared across multiple news websites).

Risks, benefits weighed of biking to work (Web)
Canberra Times - 12/03/2020
(Note: this story originated from Australian Associated Press and appeared across multiple news websites).

STV Central East 12 March 2020 07:14:58
STV Central East - 12/03/2020 07:14:58
Cyclists are 45 per cent more likely to be injured on their route to work than those travelling by bus or car, according to research from Glasgow University.

BBC Radio Scotland 12 March 2020 06:32:39
BBC Radio Scotland - 12/03/2020 06:32:39
People in the UK who cycle to work are believed to be far more likely to get hurt than those who commute by car or bus. But research from the University of Glasgow also suggests that there are lower risk of heart disease, cancer and premature death. Includes interview with Dr Paul Welsh.

LBC News 1152 (London) 12 March 2020 06:10:50
LBC News 1152 (London) - 12/03/2020 06:10:50
Latest research suggests the risk of getting injured on the way into work is putting commuters off cycling. Includes interview with Dr Paul Welsh of Glasgow University.

BBC Radio Sheffield 12 March 2020 06:04:24
BBC Radio Sheffield - 12/03/2020 06:04:24
It is claimed that cycling to work, despite the health benefits, puts you at a greater risk of getting hurt than using the car or public transport. Includes interview with Dr Paul Welsh of Glasgow University.

BBC Radio Cornwall 12 March 2020 06:02:59
BBC Radio Cornwall - 12/03/2020 06:02:59
New research about the risks of cycling to work has been published. Includes interview with Dr Paul Welsh of Glasgow University.


First published: 13 March 2020