Microscopy Montage 1The WCIP has a dedicated Imaging Technologist, Dr Robert Benson, who runs the Centre's imaging systems, supports activities across the imaging platforms, and delivers bespoke training courses. WCMP members also have access to other imaging systems within the Institute of Infection, Immunity & Inflammation, and to the Electron Microscopy Facility of the University of Glasgow.

Imaging Processing

For processing and analysis of microscopy images we have Imaris software (for 2D and 3D image segmentation processing) and FIJI/ImageJ software.

Image consultation

Dr. Robert Benson is available for training on the use of the microscopes, and can provide advice on techniques to produce high quality images for research publications.

DeltaVision Epifluorescence Microscope

DeltaVision Epifluorescence Microscope

The Centre has 2 DeltaVision microscopes – Core and RT (both from imsol – Image Solutions). They are widefield Olympus IX-71 inverted microscope equipped with computer controlled excitation and emission filter wheels for optimal excitation and collection of specific emitted fluorescence. Both microscopes have temperature and CO2 level controllers, allowing live-cell imaging acquisition for long periods of time. The systems have a high precision X and Y motorized scanning stage with Z control for capturing image stacks through fluorescently labelled samples over time. The microscopes are controlled by the softworx Linux based operational systems capable to do deconvolution. This is a mathematical tool that uses complex algorithms to reassign the out of focus light back to its original point source in the acquired image, resulting in a higher resolution 3D image stack for observation and analysis. The algorithm is restorative rather than subtractive, meaning that all the fluorescence emitted from the specimen is used to produce the final image

The Core microscope has as a source for transmitted light a LED system. For the fluorescence, the source is a solid-state illumination system (Lumencor), covering detection of several fluorochromes (e.g. DAPI, FITC, Rhodamine, Cy5, GFP, mCherry). This microscope also has a DeltaVision Laser Module (QLM), adding a focused laser beam through the objectives. This is designed for photokinetic experiments involving interaction of light with molecules and fluorophores. This system allows the users to perform FRET, FRAP and photoconversion. In the RT microscope, the fluorescence is generated by a 100W mercury arc lamp.


Confocal Microscope

Confocal Microscope

LSM 510 Meta (Carl Zeiss) Type: Inverted - Confocal, Imaging: Fluorescence and Phase Contrast Illumination: Lasers: 405 nm, 25 mW; 458 nm; 477 nm; 488 nm; 514 nm (total 30 mW); 543 nm, 1 mW; 633 nm, 5 mW; HAL 100, HBO 50 Objectives: Ph1 Plan-Neofluar 10x / NA 0.30 ∞/-, Ph2 Plan-Neofluar 20x / NA 0.50 ∞/0.17, Plan-Neofluar 40x / NA 1.30 Oil ∞/0.17, Ph3 Plan-Apochromat 63x / NA 1.40 Oil ∞/0.17,  Stage: Motorized Detection: 4 Channels: Meta channel with spectrum selection, Channel 2 (Photo Multiplier Tube), Channel 3 (Photo Multiplier Tube), Channel D (Transparent Image Detection) Software: LSM 510 software (Carl Zeiss)


Elyra SuperResolution Microscope

Elyra SuperResolution Microscope

‌A Zeiss superresolution microscope enables fluorescence imaging of structures too small for traditional methods, such as deconvolution and confocal microscopy. The Elyra has two integrated methods of superresolution - structured illumination (SR-SIM), photoactivated localization microscopy/stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (PALM-STORM). These techniques overcome the diffraction limit, bringing the optical resolution to a nanometer scale, close to electron microscopy resolution. Both techniques allow the formation of a single-image reconstruction of the original sample, where molecules and cellular structures can be highly resolved. In addition, SR-SIM offers complete flexibility in choice of fluorescent proteins and dyes, with samples processed for standard epifluorescence being able to be imaged in superresolution. Users can acquire up to four channels with double the resolution of deconvolution and confocal microscope.


Axioscope Wide-field fluorescence Microscope

Axioscope Wide-field fluorescence Microscope

We have 2 Zeiss Axioscope microscopes which are wide-field up-right microscopes, with mercury arc lamps and filters for common dyes and fluorophores – DAPI, GFP and Rhodamine. |One of the Axioscopes has a motorized stage and is running with Volocity software for imaging acquisition. The other Axioscope runs with Zen software.

To explore the samples in ultra-structural level, the members of the WTCMP have available for them several electron microscopy techniques, such as routine ultrastructural analysis and imunolocalization. Samples can be processed for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) or Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).


Electron Microscopy

Electron Microscopy

We use several electron microscopy techniques, such as routine ultrastructural analysis and imunolocalization, to explore the samples in ultra-structural level. Samples can be processed for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) or Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). WTCMP researchers have access to other microscopes, such as a Zeiss LSM 510 Confocal Microscope (contact James Reilly), and a Multiphoton Microscope (contact James Brewer).