Men, Masculinities, deprivation and sexual health

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This study explored how prevailing constructions of masculinity in the most socio-economically deprived areas of Scotland are related to sexual health attitudes and behaviours in adult heterosexual men, and whether/how these are related to adverse sexual, physical or mental health outcomes for men, their sexual contacts and partners, and other women.

This ambitious qualitative study (known as DEMASH) recruited 116 men and women from areas of high socio-economic deprivation across Scotland to 18 focus groups and 35 individual interviews. Selected images of men and women were used to facilitate discussions around meanings of sexual health, masculinity and femininity and sexual behaviours. Using a masculinities framework, the project explored how we might better develop interventions to tackle poor sexual health outcomes. Our aims were to:

  • Explore how prevailing constructions of masculinity in the most socio-economically deprived areas of Scotland are related to sexual health attitudes and behaviours in adult heterosexual men
  • Explore whether/how these are related to adverse sexual, physical or mental health outcomes for men, their sexual contacts and partners, and other women
  • Use the findings to inform the development of interventions to improve sexual health outcomes for those in areas of high deprivation.

This work highlighted the depth of the challenge to making a difference in these communities, and questioned the notion that individual-level interventions alone will impact on these issues. 

This study is led by Glasgow Caledonian University (Karen Lorimer) and is funded by the Chief Scientist Office.

Staff

Collaborators

Karen Lorimer, Glasgow Caledonian University

Lesley McMillan, Glasgow Caledonian University

Kate Hunt, University of Stirling

Dona Milne, NHS Lothian


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