Disturbed circadian rhythms are associated with mood disorders and poorer wellbeing

Disturbed circadian rhythms are associated with mood disorders and poorer wellbeing

Issued: Wed, 16 May 2018 13:06:00 BST

Disturbed circadian rhythms are associated with mood disorders and poorer wellbeing

A new study by IHW researchers has found that disrupted circadian rhythmicity is linked to worse mental health and wellbeing outcomes. The study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry, used accelerometry data from over 91,000 participants of the UK Biobank cohort to derive a measure of relative amplitude, which measures the distinction between activity levels during active and rest periods. Lower relative amplitude (linked to daytime inactivity and/or disturbed sleep) reflects disturbed 24 hour rest-activity patterns and was associated with greater risk of depression and bipolar disorder, lower subjective happiness and health satisfaction, greater loneliness, higher neuroticism scores and mood instability, and slower reaction times. The findings suggest that disruption to our circadian rhythms may be associated with vulnerability to mood disorder and poorer wellbeing, but further longitudinal studies are needed to establish the direction of causality.

Professor Danny Smith has given several interviews including this one to BBC News, radio stations countrywide, and has vast press coverage including The Guardian and The Scotsman and many more.


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