The Erasmus Mundus International Master in Central and East European, Russian and Eurasian Studies aims to give students a thorough knowledge and understanding of historical and contemporary developments in the society, politics, economics and culture of this large and diverse area.  It offers a wide variety of options for advanced study of the region's shared and divergent history, allowing students the chance to specialise in certain geographical, linguistic and thematic areas.

The programme is designed to meet the needs of a variety of employees in major public, commercial and voluntary institutional settings who wish to acquire a specialised knowledge of Central and Eastern Europe, Russia and Eurasia.  It is also intended to cater for newly graduated first degree holders seeking to enter employment in areas which require people with an in-depth knowledge of the region and highly developed analytical skills.

The International Masters in Central and East European, Russian and Eurasian Studies offers you the unique opportunity to study in three or four international universities, and to emerge with three Masters degrees from three separate institutions.  Students spend their first semester at the University of Tartu, followed by a semester at the University of Glasgow.  The first semester of year two is spent in one of the consortium's partner universities, based on the student's research interests and existing staff expertise.  Fourth mobility periods are also possible, subject to the student's dissertation requirements and institutional expertise.

 

Lasted updated 18th September 2017

Degree - the basics

This is an Erasmus Mundus Masters Course multiple degree programme. Students will emerge with three degrees:

  • International Masters (IntM) in Central and East European, Russian and Eurasian Studies: University of Glasgow, UK
  • Master of Arts (MA) in Political Science (Central and East European, Russian and Eurasian Studies): University of Tartu, Estonia


And one of the following degrees (depending on where the student spends their third mobility period): 

  • Master of Arts (MA) in Political Science (Central and East European, Russian and Eurasian Studies): Corvinus University Budapest, Hungary
  • Master of Caucasian Studies (MCS) in Political Science (Central and East European, Russian and Eurasian Studies): Ilia State University, Georgia
  • Magister (mgr) of European Studies (Central and East European, Russian and Eurasian Studies): Jagiellonian University, Poland
  • Master (M) of International Relations (Central and East European Studies): KIMEP University, Kazakhstan
  • Master (M) of Sociology (Central and East European, Russian and Eurasian Studies): National University 'Kyiv-Mohyla Academy', Ukraine
  • Master (M) in Area Studies (Central and East European, Russian and Eurasian Studies): University of Nizhni Novgorod, Russia

 

Year 1, Semester 1 - University of Tartu - you will take the core courses listed below:

  • Introduction to Central and East European, Russian and Eurasian Studies
  • Language - Polish, Hungarian, Czech, Estonian* OR Russian
  • Social Sciences methodology

*Estonian can be studied at Tartu as an optional module in year 1, semester 1, but must be taken alongside one of the four core language options that can be can be continued at Glasgow.

Option courses may include

  • Comparative Ethnopolitics
  • Conflict Management and Resolution
  • Elections and Political Behaviours
  • Foreign Policy Analysis

Year 1, Semester 2 - University of Glasgow - you will select a specialist pathway

Central and East European Studies Pathway

  • Geopolitics of Central and Eastern Europe OR Statehood and Nationality in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Language: Czech, Hungarian OR Polish

Russian Studies Pathway

  • Russian Foreign Policy OR Post-Soviet Russia: Renegotiating Global and Local Identities
  • Language: Russian

Eurasian Studies Pathway

  • Contested States: The South Caucasus after 1991 OR Rethinking Central Asian Security
  • Language: Russian

Optional courses may include:

  • De-facto States in the Post-Soviet Space
  • Developments in Czech Society since 1989
  • Media and Democratisation in CEE and the Former Soviet Union

Year 2


You will spend the second year of study at your allocated multiple degree partner university where you will follow a study track in your specialised geo-political areas in semester 1, followed by your dissertation

Year 2, Semester 1 - Partner University

You study abroad at one on the multiple degree partner universities 

Year 2, Semester 2 - Partner University

  • Dissertation
  • 3rd mobility*

* During all 3rd mobility periods, students will have a chance to complete a placement.  This placement will form part of your academic programme at the multiple degree awarding partner university and will be credit bearing.  Placements will be with a variety of non-governmental, think-tank and charitable organisations and will enable students to develop important professional skills within their region of specialisation.  These placements, while recommended, are not mandatory and students can instead opt for the more traditional route of academic modules

 

 

Last updated 18th September 2017


Aims and Intended Learning Outcomes

Aims

The IMCEERES multiple degree programme aims to provide students with thorough knowledge and understanding of historical and contemporary developments in the society, politics, economics and culture of Russia and the countries of the Central and Eastern Europe and Eurasia.

 

To this end, the programme is structured to offer a wide variety of options for advanced study of the region's shared Communist past and the ways in which this has shaped - and continues to shape - the dynamics of post-Communist and post-Cold War transformation.  The geographical area to be treated by this programme spans therefore across the wider post-Communist world, in a region that encompasses Central & Eastern Europe, Russia, and the newly independent states of the Caucasus and Central Asia.

The programme's specific components and its mobility patterns will facilitate participation in the achievement of its core aim by:

  • Presenting fresh and innovative approaches to the study of the East European and Eurasian region, based on the specialised knowledge of departmental staff;
  • Increasing the students' familiarity with a range of relevant disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches derived from the Social Sciences and Humanities;
  • Providing a knowledge of a regional language sufficient to conduct research using written sources in that language;
  • Supervising the students' independent specialised research in a topic of their choice, which will be selected within the overall parameters of the programme's partner institutions; and
  • Utilising mobility experiences to develop, appreciate the importance of, and articulate intercultural awareness

Intended Learning Outcomes and Skills

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes designed to prepare them for future academic and/or professional careers. 

Knowledge and Understanding

By the end of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate how developments across a range of disciplines have shaped - and continued to shape - the distinctive character of Russian, Central & East European, and Eurasian Studies;
  • Apply consistent and integrated approaches to theories, principles, and concepts drawn from relevant contributory disciplines and inter-disciplinary formations within an Area Studies framework; and
  • Critically evaluate relevant scholarship originating from both within and outside the region.

Skills and other attributes 

By the end of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Critically identify, conceptualise, define and formulate creative responses to new research problems;
  • Synthesise, critically evaluate, and offer professional level insights, interpretations, and solutions to data drawn from a range of primary and secondary sources, including those in their original language; and
  • Engage with complex ethical issues in the conduct of independent research involving human subjects and, where relevant, the ability to tackle these in line with University of Glasgow guidelines

Subject Specific Skills

By the end of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Combine a critical range of relevant disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches, drawing on an awareness of the latest developments in the field;
  • Critically evaluate Russia, Central & Eastern Europe, and Eurasia within a broader global context whilst retaining an appreciation of the regions internal diversity in a variety of spheres (cultural, economic, ethnic, political, social);
  • Integrate a diverse range of appropriate primary and secondary materials such as literary and historical texts, oral interviews, sound recordings, visual screenings and Internet sites;
  • Show originality and creativity in the application of a range of research techniques and methodologies appropriate to the cultural context of the region and its peoples;
  • Critically interrogate sources in one of the region's languages.

Transferable/key skills

By the end of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Exercise autonomous learning capacity, including the ability to review literature, set and solve problems, process research data by reading critically and analytically;
  • Present materials coherently in written form, with clear use of language, professional referencing and use of tables, diagrams and graphics where appropriate;
  • Successfully time-manage, to meet deadlines and to plan and execute a significant research project using a range of materials and relevant methodological approaches;
  • Communicate effectively with audiences at different levels (peer group, academic staff) and present materials orally in a clear manner, using audio-visual aids where appropriate.

Year 1

Year 1, Semester 1 - University of Tartu - 30 ECTS (60 UofG Credits)

Compulsory core courses

  • Introduction to Central and East European, Russian and Eurasian Studies
  • Social Sciences Methodology
  • Language - Polish, Hungarian, Czech, Estonian OR Russian

Optional courses 

  • International Relations
  • Foreign Policy Analysis
  • Conflict Management and Resolution
  • Baltic History and Politics
  • Comparative Ethnopolitics
  • Political and Social Change
  • Elections and Political Behaviour
  • Post-Communism
  • The Politics of History & Memory

This course list is indicative only.  Some courses might not be available every year and new courses may be added.

Year 1, Semester 2 - University of Glasgow - 30 CTS (60 UofG Credits)


Students select a specialist pathway

Central and East European Studies Pathway

  • Geopolitics of Central and Eastern Europe OR Statehood and Nationality in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Language: Czech, Hungarian OR Polish
  • 1 Optional course

Russian Studies Pathway

  • Russian Foreign Policy OR Post-Soviet Russia: Renegotiating Global and Local Identities
  • Language: Russian
  • 1 Optional course

Eurasian Studies Pathway

  • Contested States: The South Caucasus after 1991 OR Rethinking Central Asian Security
  • Language: Russian
  • 1 Optional course

Optional courses may include

  • Contested States: The South Caucasus after 1991
  • De-facto States in the Post-Soviet Space
  • Developments in Czech Society Since 1989
  • Gender and Identity in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia
  • Media and Democratisation in CEE and the Former Soviet Union
  • Rethinking Central Asian Security
  • Statehood and Nationality in Central and Eastern Europe
  • The Geopolitics of Central and Eastern Europe

You will also have the opportunity to meet representatives of the multiple degree and associate partners to discuss your research interests.  By the end of Year 1 you will have formulated your basic dissertion proposal and been allocated supervisors at both Glasgow and your allocated multiple degree partner.


Year 2

The second year of study will be spent at the allocated multiple degree partner university.  Students will follow a study track in a specialised geo-political area in semester 1.  Followed by the dissertation.

Year 2, Semester 1 - Partner University - 30 ECTS (60 UofG Credits)


Information on courses available at partner universities is below

Year 2, Semester 2

  • Dissertation/Thesis
  • 3rd Mobility

Students will be jointly supervised in the writing of the dissertation by academic staff at the partner univeristy and the University of Glasgow.

 

Corvinus University Budapest, Hungary

  • Contemporary Hungarian Politics - core course
  • Politics of Transition in East Central Europe - core course
  • Nations, Minorities and Minority Policies in East Central Europe
  • Radical Right in Europe
  • The Challenges to Security in Central and Eastern Europe
  • Parliaments in East Central Europe
  • The Politics of Development and Crisis in East Central Europe
  • Language options

Jagiellonian University, Poland

  • European Civilisation - core course
  • Foreign and International Relations in CEE Facing CFSP/ESDP
  • EU Foreign and Security Policy: Euro Atlantic Security/Foreign Policy of the EU
  • Economy of Central and Eastern Europe
  • Political and Social History of 20th Century CEE
  • Gender, Citizenship and Democracy in CEE
  • European Integration Theory and Practice
  • Language options

National University of 'Kyiv-Mohyla Academy' (NaUKMA), Ukraine

  • Ukrainian Language - core course
  • Processes of Social Changes
  • Research Seminar in Social Transformations
  • Identities and Identity Politics in Post-Communist Societies
  • Political and Economic Transformations in Post-Communist Societies: The Case of Ukraine
  • Social Structure and Dynamics
  • Health, Culture and Society
  • Sociocultural Transformations in Post-communist Societies
  • Language options

Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod (UNN), Russia

  • Socio-Economic Transformation in Post-Soviet Space
  • Political Transformations in Post-Soviet Russia
  • Russian Language
  • Russian History
  • Sociology of the Internet in Russia
  • Commonwealth of Independent States
  • Global Migration Trends in Russia
  • Middle Eastern Policy of Russia
  • Language options

KIMEP University, Kazakhstan

  • Central Asia in Global Politics 
  • Asian Security: Theory and Practice
  • Domestic Politics and Foreign Policy in the Post-Communist World
  • Emerging Powers and Markets
  • Government and Politics in Central Asia
  • Russian Foreign Policy
  • Petro Politics
  • Central Asia - Russia Relations
  • Central Asia - United States Relations
  • Language options

Ilia State University, Georgia

  • Russian Language - core course
  • Internship - core course
  • Remembering the Soviet Past in Georgia: Between Memory and History: An Introduction into Interdisciplinary Memory Studies
  • Forms and Consequences of Europeanisation in the Caucasus: Introduction to the Concept and its Application
  • Democratization and Political Development in the South Caucasus
  • Energy and Economics of Transition in the South Caucasus
  • Ethnic Conflicts in Comparative Perspective, Caucasus and Central Asia
  • Political History of the Caucasus
  • Research Seminar on Stalin and Stalinism
  • Security and Geopolitics of the Caucasus
  • Attitudes to 'Others' in Georgia

Language

Language training is available to all students in Czech, Hungarian, Polish and Russian.  In year 1, all students must study one of these core languages.  Teaching is available for beginners in all languages, intermediate in Polish and intermediate and advanced in Russian.  The International Master language courses aim to provide students with linguistic competence in the relevant language.  The courses are taught to enable students to acquire sufficient linguistic knowledge and translation skills to be able to read texts in the given language and to use these texts in their studies; and to be understood in basic everyday communicative situations.  The only linguistic precondition for entry to the International Master programme is that students must provide evidence of proficiency in English in cases where English is not the student's native language.

Students will start their language training in Tartu in semester 1 before continuing with their chosen language in semester 2 in Glasgow.

Students with advanced knowledge of a particular language from the region will be required to learn another Central and East European language.

Students can opt to take optional language training in the local languages of their third mobility university.  For Hungarian (Corvinus), Polish (Jagiellonian) and Russian (Nizhni Novgorod) students can continue their language training from year 1.  For Ukrainian (Kyiv-Mohyla), Georgian (Ilia State) and Kazakh (KIMEP), students can take these languages in addition to the languages studied in year 1.  Students who take their third mobility with Kyiv-Mohyla Academy will take Ukrainian as a core module.

Estonian can also be studied at Tartu as an optional module in year 1 semester 1, but must be taken alongside one of the four core language options that can also be continued at Glasgow (Czech, Hungarian, Polish and Russian).  Students who return to Tartu for their final semester can also enrol for extra training in Estonian, but this will not be credit-bearing and will not be included on the final degree transcript.


Mobility

Mobility refers to periods of study or research undertaken during the two years of the programme and can be broken down as follows:

1st Mobility 
Year 1, Semester 1 - University of Tartu

2nd Mobility
Year 1, Semester 2 - University of Glasgow

3rd Mobility
Year 2 - At the allocated multiple degree partner university.  In semester 1 students undertake taught courses, in semester 2 students work on their dissertation
During all third mobility periods, students will complete a placement.  This placement will form part of the academic programme at the multiple degree awarding partner university and will be credit bearing.

Additional
Students may choose to attend summer schools or find internship opportunities in the summer periods between Year 1 and Year 2.   This will not count as official degree mobility but will be recorded on students' transcripts as an activity undertaken during the programme

 

 

Last updated 20 September 2017


Assessment Methods

The Consortium Management Board will have overall responsibility for safeguarding the common standards and mechanisms for the examination of students (European and Third Country).

Each of the course components of the International Masters programme has its own form of assessment. These are outlined in the individual course handbooks. In order to calculate the final mark achieved the marks for each component are weighted according to their credit rating.

In Year 1 a candidate will be permitted to progress to Dissertation only if s/he has obtained an average aggregation score of 12 (equivalent to Grade C3) or above in the taught courses described above, with at least 75% of the credits at a score of 9 or better (Grade D3 or better) and all credits at a score of 3 or above (Grade F or above).  Moreover, a Grade D or better in the Language component must also be obtained.

Each multiple degree partner university will take responsibility for marking according to its own criteria and IMCEERES students will be assessed in the same manner as local students. A system of double marking will be employed. Each multiple degree partner university will provide assessment marks as they stand to the Consortium’s Board of Examiners, along with detailed additional descriptors, for the Board of Examiners to translate to University of Glasgow, the given partner university and the ECTS grading systems to facilitate the production of the multiple degree transcripts and Diploma Supplement issued by the Consortium.

All examination results will be discussed and finalised by the Board of Examiners and formally approved by the Consortium Management Board. The marking systems for each partner university and how these relate the University of Glasgow and ECTS systems will be made clear to students in advance.

The multiple degree will have its own External Examiner who will be represented on the BoE.

 

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