Cyrus Mutunga Kavwele

Room 214, Mathematics and Statistics Building

College of Science and Engineering

University of Glasgow

G12 8QQ, Scotland, UK

 

email: c.kavwele.1@research.gla.ac.uk

twitter: @cyruskavwele

telephone: +44 (0) 7738179545 

 

 

 

ORCID iDhttps://orcid.org/https://orcid.org/my-orcid?orcid=0000-0003-4619-515X

Research title: How resilient is the Serengeti wildebeest migration to increasing anthropogenic pressures?

Research Summary

Globally, anthropogenic activities are transforming vast natural landscapes to human modified landscapes hence altering ecosystem structure and function. Consequently, such land transformations have resulted in creation of disconnected landscapes that have resulted in loss of vital landscape connectivity. Due to lack of landscape connectivity, the existence of migratory species is highly jeopardised which could have huge ramifications at the ecosystem level especially where migratory species are key drivers of ecological processes. As such, it is imperative to understand how animal movement and collective behaviour is shaped by anthropogenic activities if meaningful conservation measures are to be taken. Broadly, my research focus is group navigation and collective behaviour of group living animals in human modified landscapes. Specifically, in my PhD research, I am interested in understanding the resilience of wildebeest to anthropogenic pressure in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania.

Grants

  • Developing methods for studying collective behaviour of group living mammals

         American Society of Mammalogists (American Society of Mammalogists )

         African Graduate Student Research Fund, 2021, amount US$ 1500

 

Additional Information

Member, British Ecological Society (BES) 

Member, American Society of Mammalogists

Member, Tropical Bilogy Association Alumni, Kenyan Chapter

Nature Kenya