COVID-19: Symptoms, testing and reporting

This is a short guide to self-diagnosing COVID-19, accessing testing, reporting cases and advice on self-isolation.

We have more comprehensive guidance in the links below.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

The main symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) are:

  • a high temperature – this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature)
  • a new, continuous cough – this means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours (if you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual)
  • a loss or change to your sense of smell or taste – this means you've noticed you cannot smell or taste anything, or things smell or taste different to normal

You can check your symptoms and what actions you should take on the NHS Inform website.

The Scottish Government issued guidance to distinguish between COVID-19 symptoms and common cold and flu-like symptoms.

How do I get tested?

If you have symptoms of COVID-19, please follow the process on the NHS Inform website, where you can find out if you should refer yourself for testing, and details on how to do so.

What should I do if I’m confirmed positive for COVID-19?

If you test positive for COVID-19 you should isolate for at least 10 days, and only go out once you have been fever-free for at least 48 hours. 

All other members of your ‘household’ who have been in contact with you must isolate for 14 days. If they are identified as close contacts by the Test & Protect team, they will also be required to be tested.

If you use the NHS Scotland Track & Trace app, a contact tracer will contact you and notify those you have been in close contact with.

You should also register your illness on the UofG Helpdesk COVID-19 report tool.

What should I do in other circumstances?

If you are symptomatic

You must isolate for a minimum of 10 days and then can return to work/study if you are well enough and have not had a fever for 48 hours.

 

If you are symptomatic and your test is positive

 

You must isolate for a minimum of 10 days and then can return to work/study if you are well enough and have not had a fever for 48 hours.

 

If you are symptomatic but your test result is negative

 

You can immediately end isolation and go back to work/study if you are well enough and have not had a fever for 48 hours.

 

You are living with a close contact of someone who is symptomatic

 

You must isolate for 14 days.

 

You are living with a close contact of someone who is symptomatic but you get a negative test result

 

You must isolate for 14 days. 

 

You are living with a close contact of someone who is symptomatic but they get a negative test result

 

You can immediately end isolation and go back to work/study if you are well and have no fever and are not a close contact of any other cases.

 

You are living with someone who has been identified as a close contact of a positive/suspected case but you have not had close contact with the suspected case yourself and you do not live in an area subject to local Covid restrictions

 

You do not need to isolate.

 

You are living with someone who has been identified as a close contact of a positive/suspected case but you have not had close contact with the suspected case yourself and you live in an area subject to local Covid restrictions

Anyone living in areas subject to additional local restrictions (this currently applies to Glasgow) and is identified as a close contact of someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, they and all those in their extended household, should self-isolate for 14 days.

 

 

Further information for students

If you are symptomatic for COVID-19, you should refer yourself for testing through the NHS Inform website.

You should notify all other members of your household that you have symptoms and have arranged to be tested, as they will also be required to quarantine for 14 days, unless you subsequently get a negative test result.

If you live in University accommodation, you should notify accom@gla.ac.uk and the local site reception that you have symptoms and that your household is in isolation - and also let them know your test result. There is more information on our Accommodation Services webpages.


More information for staff

If you are symptomatic or have received notification that you have been in contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, do not come to work. Please contact your line manager to let them know and follow the relevant guidance on self-isolation on the NHS Inform website.

If I test positive for Covid-19, how long must I stay off work?

If you test positive, you must isolate for at least 10 days and cannot return to the workplace until you have been fever-free for at least 48 hours. If you are well enough, and able to work remotely, you may do so.

You must keep your line manager informed of any test results, isolation requirements and your health status (as normal for sickness absence).

We will of course protect your confidentiality but if you are happy for your close colleagues to be notified if they could be deemed to be close contacts, please let your manager know.

If I test negative for Covid-19, when can I return to the workplace?

You should notify your line manager as soon as you get your test result and may return to the workplace as soon as you feel well enough, provided you haven’t been identified as a close contact of a confirmed case and as long as that is in line with any advice you are given by the NHS.

If I have tested positive, do I need to notify the University of any close contacts I have had recently at the University?

The Test and Protect team will contact you to establish this information and will then contact and advise your close contacts directly to advise them to self-isolate for 14 days. However, we may need to contact you if you have been on campus recently to ask you for this information before you hear from the Test & Protect team to ensure cleaning protocols are met, to protect other staff and students and identify any potential links with other confirmed cases in the University community.

Can I continue to work during self-isolation?

If you remain well enough, and are able to work remotely, you may do so for the duration of the isolation period. If you become unwell and are too unwell to continue to work, you should inform your manager that you are unwell and you will be placed on sickness absence in the normal way. If you remain well but are unable to work remotely because of the nature of your role, you will continue to receive full pay during the isolation period.


Test & Protect app

The Scottish Government's Test & Protect contact tracing app has been designed to help suppress the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19). There is more information and links to download the app on the Protect Scotland website.