Facetus.

Liber Faceti docens mores hominum.

Paris:  Nicole de la Barre, [ca. 1495-97]
4to.   A6.   [6] leaves.
Woodcut on A2r and woodcut printer’s device on A1r. 
ISTC if00034900;  GW 9673.

Shelf-mark: Sp Coll BD2-f.20 (see main library entry for this item)
Bound with: The second of four items bound together.   Bound with:  (1) Scopesus, Bartholomaeus, De arte punctuandi dialogus.  [Paris]:  Antoine Denidel, [between 1498 and 7 Sept. 1499];  (3) Persius Flaccus, Aulus, Satyrae.  Paris:  Josse Bade for Jean Petit, 24 Apr. 1505 (Renouard, 'Imprimeurs & librairies parisiens du XVIe siècle', vol.2, no. 40);  (4) Baptista Mantuanus, Bucolica seu adolescentia.  Paris:  Jean Barbier for Denis Roce, 15 Jan. 1505/06 (Renouard, 'Imprimeurs & librairies parisiens du XVIe siècle', vol.3, no.87).
Provenance: Probably sharing the same early provenances as the first item in this volume:  Scopesus, Bartholomaeus, De arte punctuandi dialogus.  [Paris]:  Antoine Denidel, [between 1498 and 7 Sept. 1499].
J(?) W (19th century):  on front free endpaper monogram “J(?) W 1835”.
Wilson (19th century):  on rear pastedown “p/n Wilsons Sale 1835”.
Edward Knight (fl. 1857-1874), bookseller, Islington, London:  sold book to William Euing.
William Euing (1788-1874), insurance broker, Glasgow:  purchased from Knight 3 Mar. 1866 according to Euing’s pencil acquisition note with price code on front free endpaper “3 3 66 Knt ad/-”;  Euing’s pencil acquisition number “No 2604” on a1r;  source confirmed in Euing’s acquisitions inventory (University of Glasgow Library, MS Euing 49).
University of Glasgow:  Euing bequest 1874.
Binding: 18th-century calf;  gold-tooled spine with red leather title label “PERSIUS &”;  red-edged leaves.   Size:  201 x 139 mm.
Leaf size: 194 x 130 mm.
Annotations: 16th-century marginal annotations in Latin in faded red ink, with occasional lines highlighted in faded red ink.
Decoration: Some capitals washed in red (faded).
Imperfections: None.
Digital version:  Available via Flickr.

 

Woodcut in Facetus. Liber Faceti docens mores hominum