History

History

Turnbull Hall

Glasgow University Catholic Chaplaincy history is a story of growth and development throughout the 20th century. At the beginning of the 20th century only a minority of students were Catholic. Socio-economic progress and access to secondary education in the decades that followed enabled more Catholics to enter third level education. As the number of Catholic students grew, the need for support was recognized. The Chaplaincy, as we know it today, has its origins in the Old Aloysian Boys’ Sodality formed in 1910 and in the Catholic Women’s Association, set up in 1918.

A formal Catholic Chaplaincy was establsihed in 1930 and Fr W.E. Brown was appointed as the first Chaplain to Catholic students. The chaplaincy was located in 53 Southpark Ave. It moved to its current location at Turnbull Hall in the 1950s and soon expanded, acquiring the two adjacent houses and building a new chapel in the grounds. As the number of students continued to grow in the post war years, the Catholic Chaplaincy nevertheless remained true to the original ethos of its founders: providing a base for Catholic students to pray, study and socialize. Trends come and go, but many alumni look back on their time at the university and reflect on the stability that the Chaplaincy provided them with. Since its founding in the early 20th century, the Chaplaincy has expanded in many ways. It is a base for students, an active parish and, as it founders envisaged, an integral part of Glasgow University

Turnbull Hall