Analysing qualitative data

Laboratory iconCourse code: RSDA6159 (Book through MyCampus). In light of the current situation with Coronavirus this course is currently available on Moodle (enrolment key: PGR).

RDF domain: A1

Speaker: Professor Susan Jamieson, School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing

Target group: Postgraduate research students new to using qualitative methods (e.g. interviews) for data collection and analysis

Credit:

Description: This workshop aims to demystify the analysis of qualitative data. Whilst this topic is addressed in education research texts, the terminology can be confusing and it can be difficult to know which of several approaches to take. The workshop will include an interactive presentation, small-group discussion, and an opportunity to practice content and thematic analysis.

By the end of this session you will be able to:

  • distinguish between different forms of qualitative data and how they may be collected
  • distinguish between different approaches to analysis of qualitative data and explain when they are best used
  • undertake content and thematic analysis

Note: This is not a course in the use of NVIVO software. Training in the use of NVIVO is offered by University of Glasgow IT services.

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Bio-imaging skills for postgraduate students

Laboratory iconRDF domain: A1, A2, A3

Speaker: Dr Craig Daly, School of Life Sciences

Credit: 1

Description: The course differs from both the undergraduate [BIOL 4190] and postgraduate [BIOL5261] bio-imaging courses in which all image data, for processing and analysis, is provided. The 'skills' course involves data collection and hands-on experience of confocal laser scanning microscopy. Participants are invited to bring their own biological samples or they can use pre-prepared slides. The course covers an introduction to image analysis, use of ImageJ software and data collection using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Participants will process, analyze and 3D-render their own data sets. T

opics covered include; digital image processing, morphometric measurement, co-localisation, multiple fluorescent probes, digital deconvolution, 3D visualisation and animation. This introductory course will not cover scripting or macro creation within ImageJ. The course runs for 4.5 days.

For more information and booking, please contact Dr Craig Daly directly at Craig.Daly@glasgow.ac.uk

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Design and analysis of comparative experiments (2 days)

Ideas iconCourse code: RSDA6099P (Book through MyCampus)

RDF domain: A1

Speaker: Professor Anna Amtmann, Institute of Molecular, Cell & Systems Biology and Dr Paul Johnson, Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine

Target group: Postgraduate research students in years 2-4

Credits: 2

Description: Comparative experiments are at the heart of hypothesis-driven research and yet they are surprisingly difficult to design and to analyse. Often it is only during write-up that design flaws become apparent, making it difficult to draw meaningful conclusions. This course explores the challenges of designing and analysing comparative experiments and their practical solutions. In four half-day sessions we will address how to:

  • formulate questions and hypotheses
  • design meaningful controls
  • identify and evaluate sources of variation
  • choose the appropriate statistical analysis methods

Each day will comprise a lecture followed by facilitated group work. The students will have the opportunity to apply the knowledge gained to their own research project and to discuss specific problems with peers and staff. Note that this is not a statistics course although considerations of how the data can and should be analysed will be an important part.

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Ethical issues and procedures for non-clinical research involving human subjects

Pen and notepad on a yellow backgroundCourse code: RSDA6040 (Book through MyCampus). In light of the current situation with Coronavirus this course is currently available as a ZOOM session online.

RDF domain: C1. 1., C1.2

Speaker: Dr Jesse Dawson, Institute of Cardiovascular & Medical Sciences

Target group: All postgraduate students undertaking non-clinical research on humans, including those who may be working on a project where ethical approval has already been granted to their academic supervisor

Credits: 2

Description: This workshop will inform students about the ethical issues that need to be considered when conducting non-clinical research on human subjects. Both the national legislation and local University guidelines governing experiments on humans will be reviewed. The procedures for seeking ethical approval from the MVLS College Ethics Committee for non-clinical research involving human subjects will also be explained. Please note that this session will not deal with clinical research or research involving NHS patients, since these fall under the separate remit of the NHS National Research Ethics Service.

It will also not deal with the ethics of experiments with animals. This workshop is mandatory for all postgraduate students undertaking non-clinical research on humans, including those who may be working on a project where ethical approval has already been granted to their academic supervisor.

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Ethics approval for people working with human subjects

Pen and notepad on a yellow backgroundCourse code: RSDC6006 (Book through MyCampus)

RDF domain: C1.2, C1.3

Speaker: Dr Georgina Wardle, School of Education

Target group: First year postgraduate research students

Credit: 1

Description: The University of Glasgow Ethics Committee is responsible for the approval of non-clinical research projects involving human participants. This workshop will review the background to regulations and principles governing such research. The workshop will also advise students on the procedure for applying for permission to undertake empirical research involving humans in non-clinical settings. It will not cover NHS applications, or applications involving work with animal.

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Fieldwork safety

Presentation iconCourse code: RSDA6004 (Book through MyCampus)

RDF domain: A1.1, A1.2, C1.1

Speaker: Dr Stewart White, School of Life Sciences

Target group: Compulsory for all postgraduate research students undertaking fieldwork

Credits: 2

Description: This course is compulsory for all field workers. The course will cover a range of topics and is designed to ensure that students are aware of the dangers associated with field work and how they can minimise these risks.

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An introduction to Omics

Programming iconRDF domain: A1.1-1.5, A1.7, A2.1, A2.3

Speakers: Dr Pawel Herzyk, Institute of Molecular, Cell and Systems Biology; Dr Richard Burchmore, School of Life Sciences; Dr Gavin Blackburn, Polyomics Facility; Dr Ronan Daly, Polyomics Facility; and Dr Graham Hamilton, Polyomics Facility

Target group: Research students and staff who wish to deepen their understanding of high-throughput data generation and analysis

Credits: 2

Description: This course will be delivered online over five half days using Moodle and Zoom. It is aimed at familiarising course participants with the basis and application of various omics disciplines: genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics. Each of the omics disciplines will be covered by a lecture and a practical bioinformatics session. By the end of the course users should understand, for each omics level: the basis of the discipline, the instrumentation used to generate high-throughput biological data, key applications, and how to visualise the resulting data using commonly used software packages. Participants will also be aware of how different large-scale data sets can integrate in order to obtain better biological inference, and appreciate the nature of other modern challenges in bioinformatics.

How to sign up:  Please email mvls-polyomics@glasgow.ac.uk The course runs from Mon 23 to Fri 27 November 2020 for five half days (mornings). The course costs 340 GBP (please provide a budget centre for charging when emailing to sign up)

If you have any further queries about course, please use the above email address.

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Qualitative research

Pen and notepad on a yellow backgroundCourse code: RSDA6041 (Book through MyCampus)

RDF domain: A1.1, A1.6. A2.1

Speaker: Dr Jacqueline Reilly, Institute of Health & Wellbeing

Target group: All postgraduate research students

Credit: 1

Description: This workshop will introduce students to the basic principles of qualitative research for the analysis of interview and focus group data. It will provide advice on when to use this approach, and a short guide to how to carry out a qualitative study. The session will be illustrated with relevant examples. The course is suitable for any student who feels that their research may include interviews or focus groups with individuals and/or groups.

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Research governance

Presentation iconCourse code: RSDA6117 (Book through MyCampus)

RDF domain: C1.2, C1.3

Speaker: Dr Debra Stuart, MVLS College Research Administration

Target group: Any student working with or within the NHS, or performing research on humans

Credit: 1

Description: The session will cover:

  • general Research Governance issues when working with human subjects
  • managing human tissue samples
  • how to obtain ethics (NHS and University)
  • how to obtain a research passport

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Screening: from early stage drug discovery to academic specialty

Presentation iconCourse code: RSDA6119 (Book through MyCampus)

RDF domain: Lead Domain is A. Includes B1, B3, C1, D1, D2, D3

Speaker: Dr Eric Kalkman, Institute of Infection, Immunity & Inflammation

Credit: 1

Description: The screening lecture aims to provide students with no pharmaceutical or drug screening background a concise overview of the way drug discovery works, both in industry and in academia. The lecture will begin discussing how pharmaceutical companies performed drug discovery for several decades using High Throughput Screening, screening millions of compounds to find a few potential drug candidates. It will discuss why this is no longer a viable model and why drug discovery is such a challenging field.

The lecture will take students through a classical drug discovery project pipe-line from early stage drug discovery to clinical trials. It will then explain how the pharmaceutical industry has had to become much more transparent and is now eager to collaborate with academia, to keep drug discovery economically viable. It will discuss the main types of screening utilized today, and go into more detail regarding High Throughput Screening and High Content Screening. Finally, the lecture will point out the likely future direction of drug discovery.

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T-tests and ANOVA for the analysis of laboratory data (primarily)

Laboratory iconCourse code: RSDA6125P (Book through MyCampus)

RDF Domain: Lead Domain is A. Includes A1, A2, C1 D2

Speaker: Dr John McClure, Institute of Cardiovascular & Medical Sciences

Credit: 1

Description: Students doing laboratory based projects often have to analyse their data using t-tests and ANOVA. This course will introduce how to:

  • decide when t-tests and ANOVA should be considered
  • check these methods' assumption
  • analyse and interpret data with these methods (using Minitab)

It will also briefly consider alternatives to t-tests and ANOVA.

Whilst the course is aimed primarily at those doing laboratory based projects, it is open to anyone who is likely to need to use t-tests or ANOVA.

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Understanding research designs in observational and randomised clinical research

Presentation iconCourse code: RSDA6065P (Book through MyCampus)

RDF Domain: A1

Speaker: Dr Alex McMahon, School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing

Target Group: All postgraduate research students

Credit: 1

Description: The course will cover the philosophy, design, and application of observational research designs such as the case-control study and the cohort study. It will be explained how the clinical trial, i.e. the randomised controlled trial (RCT), has some parallels with observational designs but also important differences. Both observational designs and the RCTs have strengths and weaknesses. The course will explain the paradigms of these designs and how one is strong when the other is weak. Issues such as confounding by indication, and confounding by severity of indication, will be discussed. Relevant parts of the development of the RCT will be explained, including regression to the mean, how to handle protocol violators, and the concept of the pragmatic trial.

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