Writing & Publishing

Writing & Publishing

In October 2014 the College of Arts focused on the industry sector of Writing & Publishing. Highlighting our past and present work with a broad range of organisations in this field, we were delighted to stimulate new partnerships and explore new opportunities, and continue to do so.

The written word is an essential tool for effective communication

Photograph of library bookshelves with lots of books

Writing and publishing are essential for effective communication across organisations, industries and sectors. The College of Arts at the University of Glasgow is a centre of expertise for the interpretation of existing text and authorship, and for the use of language, writing and publishing to communicate important information to communities within and beyond academia.

Academics working in the College of Arts engage with partners in a diverse range of writing and publishing activities. Certainly, Arts researchers at the University of Glasgow produce vast numbers of research monographs: some for an academic audience, and others crossover volumes produced for a wider audience. Arts researchers are also responsible for editing the works of literary figures, authoring biographies of cultural and historical figures, and writing accounts of key cultural and historical moments. Our contribution to the writing and publishing industry in this respect is quite obvious, but for us it has always been about much more than simply writing up our research for reproduction in print volumes.

Arts researchers frequently work alongside industry partners to produce quality works of creative and critical writing, as authors, peer reviewers and committee members. Also based in the College are series editors who are committed to selecting new and exciting research in their area of expertise, and seeing it through to publication in collaboration with major publishing houses. Academics often collaborate with the Press to disseminate their research, and to contribute informed commentary on current affairs, while staff in the Modern Languages discipline engage in literary and translation activities, helping to increase the audience for texts, publications and media, and to promote international cultural awareness.

In collaboration with authors and publishers, several Arts researchers at the University of Glasgow are exploring the very process of writing and publishing, contributing to an enhanced understanding of the publishing industry: how it has developed historically, and how it functions in the present day.

Furthermore, it is important to recognise that writing and publishing in the 21st Century extends far beyond the printed text. The College of Arts is also, therefore, committed to the digital humanities, and is working with industry partners to publish research online, via Apps and digital resources.

Examples of these wide-ranging activities and their mutual benefits for the University and industry partners are available on our Writing and Publishing Case Study pages. It is important to recognise that the College of Arts engages in these activities with four things in mind: research possibilities; potential benefits for our students (via knowledge exchange and placement opportunities); potential benefits for writing and publishing industry partners; and the potential benefits for society in general.

Writing and Publishing month is all about reinvigorating existing partnerships and establishing new partnerships between the College of Arts and writing and publishing professionals. And so, I’d like to close by posing the following question: How can we work together to better understand and enhance the writing and publishing industry?

- Dr Pauline Mackay


To learn more about Writing & Publishing or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).


Writing & Publishing KE Case Studies

Writing & Publishing KE Case Studies

Britské listy

Dr Jan Culik edits and publishes the widely read Czech language journal Britské listy. This is a cultural and political journal, which currently has 2.9 million readers each year. Czech politicians and decision makers read the journal, a fact that has led to consultations between academics and top politicians. The website has also featured in contemporary Czech fiction.
The website for the journal appears in both Czech and English, the Czech version being the most popular. As it is widely known that the editor-in-chief is an academic in the University of Glasgow College of Arts, there is considerable recognition of and publicity for the institution in the country.

Partner:
The Britské listy Public Association

Academic:
Dr Jan Culik


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Introducing the works of Ivan Bunin to a new generation

The work of Andrei Rogatchevski, an academic in the College of Arts, has brought the work of Ivan Bunin to a new public by supporting new translations of his books. Bunin (1870-1953) was Russia’s first Nobel Prize winner for literature and was originally published in England by Hogarth Press. Rogartchevski found previously unknown letters in the Hogarth Press archive that began to uncover new aspects of the writer’s life and works.

This research encouraged Alma Books (Independent Publisher of the Year 2013) to ask Rogatchevski to contribute ‘extra material’ to their reissue of Bunin’s Dark Avenues, adding significantly to the reader’s knowledge and experience of the text.

Project Partner: 
Alma Books

Academic: 
Dr Andrei Rogatchevski


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Censorship in the 21st century - How Spanish culture still suffers the effects of Franco’s dictatorship

Dr Jordi Cornella  (Lecturer in Hispanic Studies) researches the effects of censorship on translation during Franco’s regime (1939-1975) in order to shed light on the dictatorship’s cultural policies and post-war publishing and translation practices. Jordi’s research has cast considerable light on the Spanish publishing industry by demonstrating that the impact of censorship extends well beyond Franco’s regime, because publishers are still reissuing works that were expurgated by the censors more than 60 years ago.

 Jordi’s goal is to explore why the advent of democracy did not stop the production, circulation and consumption of censored books, to raise awareness of the long-lasting effects of Francoist repressive policies, and to promote a debate around this issue so that readers, translators and publishing sector are aware of the problem and can devise strategies to address this unresolved issue.

 To-date, Jordi’s AHRC-funded research has attracted the attention of the Spanish and UK media alike (The Times, Daily Mail, Radio 4, El Periodico, Ara, Quimera) and he has been invited to deliver several public lectures on this topic in Spain.


Academic:
Dr Jordi Cornella


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Early Cinema in Scotland

The AHRC-funded ‘Early Cinema in Scotland’ project is based in the School of Culture and Creative Arts. The five-strong research team (split between Glasgow and Edinburgh) includes part-time, full-time, and postgraduate researchers, all of whom have autonomy to develop their interests and engage with the writing and publishing industry as appropriate. Some of the collaborations we have established are as simple as chatting to journalists preparing pieces on related topics, or contributing written material to partners’ websites (such as Glasgow Film Theatre’s ‘Cinema City’ initiative). More concerted efforts include the developing of teaching packs for schools in partnership with the Scottish Screen Archive and Glasgow Film Theatre.

These collaborations have been valuable not only to raise the project’s profile and create points of contact with the public, but also as drivers of research. External collaborations help to develop sharper focus and clearer ideas, expressed more concisely. The collaborations also open up creative approaches. A memorable example is the work of writer Emma Lennox for The Drouth magazine. After inviting two of the project researchers for a conversation on women in early cinema, the writer reworked the dialogue into a semi-fictional piece that brought historical figures to life. In this case, the project expertise was greatly enriched by the writer’s creativity. Examples like these show how working with external partners facilitates the team’s engagement with broader audiences, and therefore contributes to the wider aims of the project.

 

Academic:
Maria Velez-Serna


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Advising government on an independent Scotland

An academic from the College of Arts has become one of the UK’s leading experts on Scottish independence and defence. Phillips O’Brien was asked to work with the UK Parliament’s Scottish Affairs Committee (SAC) in 2012 to develop defence-related research questions for their inquiry into ‘Referendum on Separation for Scotland’. O’Brien was also asked to provide evidence to the inquiry on the implications of Scottish independence for Scottish naval bases.

Further to this, O’Brien has submitted a briefing paper to the House of Commons’ Foreign Affairs Committee on the international implications of Scottish independence, clearly influencing the examination of the issues under debate.

Project Partner: 
UK Parliament, House of Commons

Academic: 
Dr Phillips O'Brien


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Breaking Down the Barriers of Engagement with Writing

An image taken from the production of 'The Lady from the Sea'Zoe Strachan is the author of three novels: Ever Fallen in Love, Spin Cycle and Negative Space, and has taught on the Glasgow Creative Writing Programme since 2003. Her short stories and essays have been included in numerous journals and anthologies, she contributes to various newspapers and magazines and her work has been broadcast on BBC Radio 4 and Radio 3.
As well as receiving numerous international fellowships, in recent years Zoe has engaged with interdisciplinary projects. She has collaborated on the exhibition and publication ‘I throw my prayers into the sky’ (Internationales Künstlerhaus Villa Concordia, Germany) and theatre productions with the Citizens Theatre and Oran Mor, Glasgow. Zoe’s most recent high-profile work has been in opera.

Academic:
Zoe Strachan


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Development of Gaelic Language Plan for the University of Glasgow

The University of Glasgow was asked to prepare a Gaelic Language Plan for the University of Glasgow in 2011 under the terms of the Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005. This is a fantastic example of cross-university collaboration meeting the needs of Government legislation.
This official policy was launched in March 2013 and involves the development of Gaelic language and culture within the context of key functions identified by Bòrd na Gàidhlig, the national development agency for Gaelic, including: Communications, Staffing, Publications and Identity.
In addition, the university will incorporate Gaelic into the Student Experience at Glasgow in a number of ways, to continue the work of the pioneering Gaelic Language Initiative established in 2009.

Partner:
Bòrd na Gàidhlig


Gaelic Language Officer:
Fiona Dunn


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Writing & Publishing: FÈIS LITREACHAIS – A Gaelic Literature Festival in collaboration with the Gaelic Books Council

On the 8th of October 2014, Fiona Dunn (Gaelic Language Officer) is running a Gaelic Literature Festival 2pm - 7pm, Gilchrist Postgraduate Club. The event is being run in collaboration with the Gaelic Book Council with several professionals from the publishing industry involved as participants. The Gaelic Book Council works alongside a variety of publishing companies to develop Gaelic literature and support writers.

The festival will provide students (complete beginners, learners & fluent speakers) with an insight into the world of Gaelic literature via a series of talks and workshops delivered by professional writers, broadcasters and academics. The aim is to advise students on how best to develop their own knowledge of and skills in Gaelic writing and reading, and to enhance their knowledge of the Gaelic publishing industry. At the same time, industry partners gain an awareness of forthcoming talent and prospective graduate employees, whilst having the opportunity to promote their organisation and new products to the students (who are very much an important audience).

To attend you must register by emailing, Fiona.Dunn@glasgow.ac.uk by Monday 6th October

 

Project Partner:
Gaelic Book Council

Academic:
Fiona Dunn


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Giglets: Scots Ebooks for Schools

Dr Susan Rennie (English Language) is currently collaborating with Giglets in Ayrshire. Giglets produce educational ebooks for children, and Susan is assisting in the production of Scots translations of ebooks for schools. Susan recently contributed a Scots translation of an abridgement of Washington Irving's Legend of Sleepy Hollow (which becomes 'Sleepery Howe’ in Scots). Following on from this, she is now working with eight student translators to produce another four titles in Scots (DraculaMacbeth, Peter Pan, and The Legend of Knockmany).

This project offers our students the chance to be involved in a commercial publishing project, and to be named as co-translators in a final publication. Along the way, they are learning 'on the job' about the mechanics of writing and translating into Scots, and picking up some key editorial skills and experience of working in a creative team. With the introduction of a new SQA Award in Scots Language, there is already increasing demand for schools materials in Scots, and there are likely to be opportunities for new translators to enter the field. However, publishers can sometimes be wary of commissioning untried Scots translators, so this project offers an ideal training ground. There are also plans to put on a workshop for students later in the year, as part of a wider scheme to promote and encourage Scots writing and translation, especially for children.  

Scots is a living language, with many varieties, so it is always exciting to see how new translators approach the task of translation. In research terms, this project has already helped Susan to see immediate, practical applications for the data being compiled for the AHRC Historical Thesaurus of Scots project. The organisation of Scots words and phrases into subject categories, rather than the alphabetical order of a dictionary, will assist both new and experienced translators and writers to hone in on terms that are appropriate to context and historical period as well as being rich and resonant in themselves.

 

Project Partner:
Giglets

Academic:
Dr Susan Rennie


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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A Traveller’s Guide to Literary Scotland

A photograph of Jenni Steele, Head of Partnership Communications at VisitScotland and Professor Alan Riach, Professor of Scottish Literature, sitting on a sofa in the Scottish landscape, holding books and talking. In partnership with VisitScotland and the Association of Scottish Literary Studies (ASLS), Alan Riach, Professor of Scottish Literature, produced a Traveller’s Guide to Literary Scotland. The guide won the 2011 Gold Award for Best Publication at the Chartered Institute of Public Relations Pride awards, and is available in printed form in all VisitScotland Information Centres and to download.
‘The guide pinpoints the stunning settings for world-famous novels, the scenery that inspired poets and the birthplaces of some of the country’s most distinguished writers. It’s a treasure trove of information. From the highbrow to the child-friendly, the guide is useful for anyone curious about our story-tellers. It’s an ideal way to improve your knowledge of Scotland’s great literary and cultural offerings. (Daily Record)

Partner:
VisitScotland, ASLS

Download the guide:
www.scotland.org/features/a-travellers-guide-to-literary-scotland


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Compiling & Publishing the Historical Thesaurus

The Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary (HT) was published in 2009 by academics in the College of Arts. It is a major new resource for the English language and has already had a widespread impact. It was named book of the year in The Guardian and the Times Literary Supplement. It is currently in its fourth print run in three years with sales revenue of approximately £1.6 million of global sales, brining economic benefit to the publishing industry.

In 2010 the HT was integrated with the online Oxford English Dictionary, forming a single accessible resource. It has been widely used by international academics and historical novelists such as Mary Robinette Kowal, Geraldine Brooks and Philip Pullman.

Project Partner:
Oxford English Dictionary


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The Road to Independence

A photograph of Professor Murray Pittock and Alex Salmond in front of the Scottish flag

Murray became a regular contributor to high-level debates about Scottish independence in the press and media, and was engaged as a participant on governmental advisory groups. He convened the National Champions Group for Scottish Studies in 2011-13. Following the Scottish National Party’s success in the 2011 Scottish Parliament Elections, the movement towards the Referendum of 18th September 2014 and, indeed, the book’s previous success, a comprehensively rewritten study was published in 2014: The Road to Independence?: Scotland in the Balance. The Daily Telegraph rated the book one of five must reads on independence and Bella Caledonia included it in a list of the best 24 books on Scottish nationality in the last century.

The argument of the book was summarized in the Radio 4 series The Roots of Scottish Nationalism, which had an aggregate audience of 6.25 million across its 5 episodes and an audience rating of 81%; The Week also published a condensed briefing on the Referendum taken from the book, Independence for Scotland? The book was launched in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Belfast: in the last location, it was No. 1 Northern Ireland political story on the day and No. 1 NI political story on Twitter. Throughout 2014, Murray commented for government and other agencies on documents and speeches before release, and presented on the Scottish brand and its export markets at Dynamic Earth in Edinburgh in August and elsewhere, as well as twice briefing Russell Group communications directors on the Scottish situation. The book’s ideas received media coverage in the UK, US, Australia, Brazil, Chile, China, France, Germany, Ghana, Haiti, Ireland, al-Jazeera, Pakistan, Portugal, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Switzerland and Turkey in outlets from the Financial Times to Nature, and Murray appeared live on Russia Today from Moscow at 7pm on the day after the Referendum, generating in all around 160 media and 260 social media appearances with c6300 YouTube video views.

In April 2014, Murray visited the Keogh-Naughton Centre for Irish Studies at Notre Dame to participate in the National Endowment for the Humanities seminar on ‘The Public Sphere in the Four Nations’, being cited as ‘Scotland’s leading public intellectual’.

Academic:
Prof Murray Pittock


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Collaborating with Forestry Commission Scotland towards an Outdoor Learning Guide

Dr Nyree Finlay (Senior Lecturer in Archaeology) works in partnership with Forestry Commission Scotland as an archaeological specialist on the mesolithic period. She recently contributed to an outdoor educational learning guide for teachers for Curriculum for Excellence level 2: Wolf Brother’s Wildwoods: Imagining Mesolithic Life in Scotland’s Forests and Woodlands.

The guide features extracts from author Michelle Paver’s Wolf Brother: the first of the ‘Chronicles of Ancient Darkness’ children’s books series. It is freely available online and has had enthusiastic uptake by schools. This project developed from an earlier collaboration with Forestry Commission Scotland where Nyree contributed information about stone tools on a mesolithic site. Such projects are an important part of Nyree’s professional practice, allowing her to bring mesolithic research to the general public by participating in various archaeological and heritage knowledge exchange activities.

 

Project Partner: 
Forestry Commission Scotland

Academic: 
Dr Nyree Finlay


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Collaborating with Palgrave MacMillan and the Live Art Development Agency

Professor Dee Heddon (Professor of Contemporary Performance) collaborates with the publisher Palgrave Macmillan as a committee member, reader, reviewer, and as the co-editor of the recently launched series of volumes, “Performing Landscapes”.

Dee is a regular contributor to performance festival publications, and she has also project-managed and co-edited a limited edition catalogue, The National Review of Live Art 1979-2010: A Personal History (Essays, Anecdotes, Drawings and Images). This was to both celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the National Review of Live Art and to mark its final festival- NRLA 2010.

Currently, Dee is collaborating with Live Art Development Agency on an edited edition which pays testimony to the work of performance artist Adrian Howells, a Fellow of the University of Glasgow from 2006 – 2014.

Dee’s collaborations contribute to the publishing and performance industries by identifying gaps in the existing offer and providing expertise and specialist knowledge of specific areas of performance practice, specifically live art and autobiographical performance.  Dee’s writing extends from academic research publications to more popular, informed survey pieces, for example for the AntiFestival in Finland. Such collaborations allow Dee to share her knowledge with wider public communities which have led, in turn, to further invitations to attend events, act as an artists’ mentor, and contribute to discussions and agenda-setting in relation to the fields of performance and live art.

Project Partner:

Palgrave MacMillan, Live Art Development Agency

Academic:
Prof Dee Heddon


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Creative Writing in the College of Arts

A College of Arts academic has a strong relationship with BBC Radio 4. Elizabeth Reeder is a Lecturer in Creative Writing, and a prolific writer of fiction, with novels and short stories and numerous radio programmes to her credit.
Her broadcasts for BBC Radio 4 include a Women’s Hour Serial, stories, and abridgments of Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead, Sara Wheeler’s Magnetic North and Annie Proulx’s Bird Cloud.
Elizabeth’s novel Ramshackle was shortlisted for the prestigious 2012 Saltire Prize, and widely – and favourably -- reviewed; it was published by Freight Books, one of the wave of ‘indie’ presses through which some of the most exciting and innovative fiction is now being published.

Academic:
Dr Elizabeth Reeder


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Writing about Robert Burns for an International Audience

The Centre for Robert Burns Studies (CRBS) regularly engages with industry as part of the Culture and Heritage partnership Burns Scotland (the national Burns collection). CRBS engages in writing and publishing activities in order to disseminate research about the life and works of Scotland's most universally famous literary figure: Robert Burns (1759 - 1796). As part of a major AHRC-funded project led by Professor Gerard Carruthers - 'Editing Robert Burns for the 21st Century' - the project team are producing a multi-volume edition of the works of Robert Burns for publication by Oxford University Press.

The CRBS team also regularly compose and contribute to texts for publication in the Scottish Press (recently, The Guardian, The Herald, The Scotsman, The Daily Record); exhibition texts (for both museum-based and online exhibitions); and texts for publication online and as part of Apps (for example, the US-based 'Robert Burns Lives!' online periodical, and an interactive timeline authored for the Scottish government's Robert Burns App and due to be published in 2015). The team also contribute to book festivals, most recently 'Aye Write' (2014) where a research-based drama documentary about the activities of 'Antique Smith' (a famous nineteenth-century Burns forger), co-authored by Professor Carruthers, was performed for the first time.

The Centre's engagement with industry and the general public through writing and publishing activities ensures that research undertaken at CRBS reaches the extensive worldwide community of scholars and enthusiasts who are interested in Scottish culture and the national bard.

Project Partner:
Burns Scotland
Oxford University Press
Various Scottish Press

Academic:
Prof. Gerard Carruthers

 

To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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e-Publishing and the College of Arts


Glasgow Digital Humanities (GDH) is one of the leading groupings of its kind in the UK, if not in the world.
Many of the projects associated with GDH flag the future in terms of e-publishing, and the College is keen to develop synergies with publishing houses looking to expand their portfolios in this area.

Academic:
Prof Jeremy Smith


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Reaching out to Industry with Student Placements in Translation Studies

The MSc in Translation Studies has been designed and approved with industry collaboration in mind. Translation industry experts, from members of organisations based in Scotland such as DNA Language, Glasgow, and freelance translators, have been invited to the College of Arts to deliver material to the students that they have designed themselves.
Students benefit from the way in which the course successfully blends theoretical content with practice and industry contribution. In the future, students will be offered placements with translation organisations and relevant professions. Academics also hope to make the most of contacts within agencies such as The Word Gym in Scotland, and beyond. They also aim to develop relationships with publishers such as Canongate Books (Edinburgh) and Arcadia Books (London).

Academic:
Dr Georgina Collins


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Writing & Publishing: Translating Dialogue into Old French for the History Channel series, ‘Vikings’

Dr James Simpson (Reader in French) has been translating dialogue for the upcoming third season of the History Channel series, Vikings, which centres on the Viking raids on Paris in the mid ninth century.

James has contributed his research and linguistic expertise in order to translate modern idiomatic dialogue into the language of the period (referred to as Old French), both at the script-writing stage and when the cast are on set. James’s work in this respect has proven so effective that the use of Old French in the series has increased as a result.

James’s collaboration on Vikings ensures confidence in the dialogue, enhances the authenticity of the production, and raises awareness of James’s research/discipline beyond the academy.

As James comments: ‘Engaging in this sort of reconstruction is hard work, but it’s also tremendous fun. The Viking raiding and exploration that began in the eighth century had an immense impact on European cultures, and the Vikings settled and assimilated in a number of places. The Vikings programme shows the main characters encountering new languages, customs and ideas. Of course it’s fun to see films and TV series that use other languages, whether historical or invented, because it pretty much always adds to the flavour. However, what’s particularly interesting about this show is that the historical dialogue highlights problems of contact, understanding and identity in very thoughtful ways, with the characters themselves curious about new things and new words, but also wondering how those new perspectives will transform them and their own culture. And, without giving anything away, Season Three continues in that vein – only more so, because going to France changes everybody.’

 

Project Partner:
History Channel

Academic:
Dr James Simpson


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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‘How British is Scotland?’ and ‘Vox Populi’ in the Scottish Press

Over the past two years, the Centre for Scottish and Celtic Studies has worked with the Scottish Press to publish essays in newspapers based upon public lectures and seminars at Glasgow.  In 2012-13, essays from the 'Vox Populi: The Voice of the Scottish People in History' series were published in The Scotsman, and in 2014-15 essays from the 'How British is Scotland?' series were published in The Herald. The articles were composed by the speakers, and appeared on or near the date of the lecture.

This collaboration enabled the Centre for Scottish and Celtic Studies to advertise their public lectures, and to convey research findings to wider, non-academic audiences through short articles. In turn, the Scottish press and the general public benefitted from engaged and informed cultural, historical and political commentary in the run up to the Independence Referendum on the 18th September 2014.

'Vox Populi' Articles and Podcasts
'How British is Scotland?' Podcasts

Project Partner:
Various Scottish Press

Academic:
Dr Karin Bowie and Dr Catriona Macdonald


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Judging the Wolfson History Prize

Professor Julia Smith (Edwards Chair in Medieval History) collaborates with the Wolfson Foundation as one of the four Judges of the annual Wolfson History Prize. The Wolfson History Prize is awarded annually to promote and encourage standards of excellence in the writing of history for the general public. The prize is awarded to UK citizens; the winning books may be published anywhere.

In this forum, Julia makes a major contribution to shaping public engagement with the discipline of History, and indirectly, the Humanities more generally.  The Prize attracts considerable national press coverage, influences the purchases and tastes of the reading public; significantly enhances the sales of the winning titles; and benchmarks the highest standards of historical scholarship in the UK for academic and non-academic readers and authors alike.  Prizewinning volumes have to combine original, imaginative approaches with superb technical scholarship, without any loss of readability or accessibility. The annual prize-giving is one of the main UK forums where History as a discipline engages in knowledge exchange. 

Further information can be found by following the link to the Wolfson History Prize

 

Academic:
Prof Julia Smith


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Collaborating on a National Academy of Comics

Prof Laurence Grove hopes to raise awareness of the importance of comic books and their historical connection to Glasgow. With an exhibition at The Hunterian in 2016, Laurence is also in talks with the Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), Creative Scotland and members of the comics industry to set up a National Academy of Comics here in Glasgow, which may become the object of a bid for major grant funding.

Professor Grove knows that there is a big interest in comics in Glasgow from his partnership with Comic Con, a major comic conference that is held every July at the CCA. A National Academy of Comics would give comics a sense of place in Glasgow where makers, sellers and buyers of comics could come together with people from across Scotland. For this venture to work, it will need to be truly cross disciplinary and collaborative.

Project Partners: 
Comic Con, CCA. Creative Scotland

Academic: 
Professor Laurence Grove


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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