Visual Arts

Visual Arts

Visual Art offers us many models for how to be interested in the world, and to present knowledge about it. Academia no doubt has a great deal to learn from art in this regard, and hopefully also a good deal to contribute. This month we shall be sharing a broad range of projects and partnerships with which we are involved and invite you to get in touch to share your interests and experiences in Visual Arts.

Putting ourselves in the picture: visual arts and the University

‌‌A photograph of one of the artworks in GENERATION - a multi-venue exhibition in 2014 showcasing contemporary art in ScotlandGlasgow is a wonderful place to engage in academic work on the visual arts. From its medieval heritage, embodied in the Cathedral and its rich history, to the wealth of historic collections in the city, displayed at venues such as the Burrell or Kelvingrove, and up to the vibrancy of its renowned contemporary art scene, Glasgow offers many and varied opportunities to see art and to think about it. The University of Glasgow plays its own role in this, of course, via the outstanding collections of the Hunterian Art Gallery, but also through the many ways in which staff from different disciplines engage with visual art in their research. Just as art itself is incredibly various, so the kinds of work that is undertaken in relation to visual art are varied, and the forms used to share that work range widely, as we hope is evident from the case studies outlined on our website.


University staff from across the College of Arts have curated exhibitions, bringing their expertise to bear on the selection and display of works of art. They have contributed their knowledge to the interpretation of works, exhibitions and collections, through familiar academic formats such as the journal article or monographic book, and also through constructing websites and digital archives, writing texts in exhibition catalogues, generating publicity materials, interpretation panels and so on. Gallery talks are another medium for transmitting and sharing our work, and here again there is a great deal of activity, with staff travelling internationally to offer their insights to arts audiences. One of the great advantages of working in this way is precisely the fact that it enables academic knowledge to be shared with interested publics outside the institution, and for that knowledge to impact on a larger public understanding of visual art.


Because Glasgow is such a lively city in terms of the visual arts, it is also an ideal location for working collaboratively with institutions, curators, or directly with artists. In addition to collaborations of those kinds, staff have acted in advisory capacities, on steering groups and boards, for instance, helping to support partner organisations in varied ways, including with ambitious research projects. The University has itself benefitted greatly from its collaborations with, for example, Glasgow Museums, with The Glasgow School of Art, and with venues such as The Common Guild, all of which have brought professional expertise into the University, and ensured that ‘knowledge exchange’ is very much a two-way process. This goes beyond the local too, encompassing activities of a truly global nature, with exhibitions in Spain and Japan, for instance, amongst recent projects realized by University staff.


Visual art offers us many models for how to be interested in the world, and to present knowledge about it. Academia no doubt has a great deal to learn from art in this regard, and hopefully also a good deal to contribute. During November 2014 when there is a special focus on knowledge exchange and visual art, we hope that both our existing partnerships and perhaps some new ones too can develop in exciting ways.
How can academic research best work in partnership with the individuals and organisations that produce, collect, curate, display and interpret art for their audiences? Working together, how can we deepen our collective understanding of visual art, and perhaps enhance our enjoyment of it in the process?

- Dr Dominic Paterson


To learn more about Visual Arts or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).


Visual Arts KE Case Studies

Visual Arts KE Case Studies

An Investigation of the Bury Chest

A large oak chest in the Burrell Collection, Glasgow, is associated with Richard de Bury (1281-1345) and the office of the Court of Chancery of the Palatinate of Durham, where de Bury was Bishop from 1334-1345.
The project aims to gather technical data on the paints and traces of organic matter on the chest, which College of Arts academics helped to analyse. The paint layers show the use of two inorganic red pigments, possibly vermilion and lead, as well as indigo (woad) and chalk in the blue layer and Vergaut (orpiment and indigo) in the green layer.
These first results indicate that the paint layers are contemporary with the c.1340 date of the chest.

Project Partners:
The Burrell Collection

Academic:
Dr Erma Hermens


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Researching the Catalogue for the Lady Lever Art Gallery

In 2009, National Museums Liverpool launched a new online Catalogue of the Chinese works of art collected by industrialist and philanthropist, William Hesketh Lever (1851-1925) which now form part of the Lady Lever Art Gallery collection at Port Sunlight.
Academics at the College of Arts undertook the research for the Catalogue. The Gallery’s comprehensive archive documents Lever’s collecting activities and allowed the team to trace individual pieces back to former owners, including such famous names as James McNeill Whistler, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Lord Leighton.
Fully illustrated and freely accessible online, (www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ladylever/collections/chinese/) the Catalogue includes individual entries on each object and contextual essays, providing its users with a greater understanding of Lever the collector and this part of his collection.

Project Partners:
Lady Lever Art Gallery

Academic:
Prof Nick Pearce


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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National Collecting Scheme Scotland

Paisley Museum and Art Gallery is one of seven museums and galleries in Scotland which participated in the National Collecting Scheme Scotland between 2003-2013, helping the partners to acquire more than 200 works of contemporary art and craft.
Since 2007, Dr Tina Fiske has supported Andrea Kusel, Curator of Art at Paisley, to pursue further acquisitions of contemporary art, undertake research travel, and participate in a programme of studio and gallery visits and events organized by the College.
The scheme has provided Paisley with external funding to support their collection as well as offering peer networks to share and develop curatorial practice. The next stage, ‘Affiliate’, will provide a new phase of peer development activity for 2013-2015.

Project Partners:
Paisley Museum and Art Gallery

Academic:
Dr Tina Fiske


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The Etchings Project

A section of 'The Doorway'(1879/1880), an etching by James McNeill Whistler, Hunterian Art GalleryThe Etchings Project is a catalogue of the etchings of James McNeill Whistler, including a virtual exhibition. It contains many previously unknown etchings and identifies sitters and sites. It is fully annotated, illustrated, and linked to the online website of Whistler’s Correspondence.
The website is a major resource on 19th century art and the art market, and is accessed by art dealers, auction houses, curators, collectors, artists, students and public all over the world. Plans are now under consideration to extend the online website to include Whistler’s oil paintings and works on paper. Forthcoming exhibitions benefiting from this project include An American in London: Whistler and the Thames, travelling to London, Washington, and Japan in 2013-2014.

Website:
http://etchings.arts.gla.ac.uk

Academic:
Prof Margaret MacDonald


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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National Inventory Research Project (NIRP)

The University houses the National Inventory Research Project, which since 2003 has helped curators in over 200 museums across Britain research their Old Master paintings. The project is an initiative of the UK museum sector, which has attracted over £900,000 in grants, employing over 30 trained art historians to undertake new research and creating up-to-date records on over 9,000 paintings.
The project outcomes are published on the Visual Arts Data Service as NICE Paintings: the National Inventory of Continental European Paintings and available through the BBC website Your Paintings. Research is thus disseminated worldwide, promoting museum collections and providing a resource for researchers, curators and the general public.
NIRP’s current project ‘NIRP in the North’ is working with curators and collections in the city art galleries of Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds and York to recatalogue 1,000 of their old master paintings.

Project Partners:
National Gallery, London

Academic:
Andrew Greg


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Art Detective - previously Oil Painting Expert Network (OPEN)

The College of Arts is the academic partner of the Public Catalogue Foundation (PCF) in its newly launched project, Art Detective. This public engagement project allows members of the public, curators across the UK, and experts around the world to interact in public discussions about the UK’s art collections and improve information about them.
Curators are able to ask a network of experts and specialists from academia, museums and the art trade, as well as the interested members of the public, to make suggestions about information missing from their paintings, for example attributions of authorship and the identity of sitters or locations.
Anyone can make suggestions for new or improved information about oil paintings in public ownership in the UK via links from the Your Paintings website.
Academics from the College of Arts worked with the PCF on the design, and continue to work on the implementation and monitoring, of Art Detective.

Partner:
Public Catalogue Foundation

Academic:
Andrew Greg


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Into The Workplace

Practical experience in the workplace is essential for today’s graduates. Through work placements and internships, History of Art and Museum Studies postgraduate students have completed tasks including cataloguing and photographing collections, enhancing databases and setting up Flickr sets for over 20 partner museums, galleries, historic houses and archives.
Additional outcomes have included creating surveys, collecting feedback from visitors, and assisting in or running events. History of Art’s partnership with organisations in Glasgow and further afield has not only provided students with the means to gain new skills and apply their knowledge in a professional work environment, but also contributed to the outcomes of the host institutions in a measurable way.

Partners include:
Museums, galleries, historic houses and archives

Academic:
Liz Hancock


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Your Paintings Tagger

The pioneering crowd-sourcing project Your Paintings Tagger was developed by the Public Catalogue Foundation (PCF) in collaboration with the College of Arts.
The Tagger uses the skills and brainpower of the general public to generate descriptive tags for the 211,000 images of oil paintings in UK public collections on the BBC/PCF website Your Paintings. These tags will allow Your Paintings to be fully searched and filtered by the content and style of the paintings.
Since its launch in 2011, the Tagger has attracted over 11,000 taggers who have generated nearly 6 million tags. Over 23,000 paintings have been tagged with an average of 30 descriptive terms and are ready for inclusion on Your Paintings.

Partner:
Public Catalogue Foundation

Academic:
Andrew Greg


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Shifting perceptions of the Bande Dessinée

Bande Dessinée, French-language comic strips, were little studied until Laurence Grove, an academic in the College of Arts, began promoting the research and teaching of the discipline. Now BD is taught in around 20 universities in the UK, Europe and North America and is also included in general culture courses that are not BD-based. A freely accessible database of French Emblems, funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council, was launched in 2009 and has received over 24million hits since then.

Working with the Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery, Grove organised an exhibition in 2011 called ‘Breaking the Renaissance Code: Emblems and Emblem Books’ that attracted over 15,000 visitors in three months. The exhibition traced the development of emblem books and their influence on literature and modern arts in the modern world, establishing a link to today’s French-language comic strips and graphic novels for a wider audience.

Project Partner: 
Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery

Academic: 
Dr Laurence Grove


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Spreading knowledge about ancient pots and contemporary jewellery

From ancient pots to contemporary jewellery, Professor Elizabeth Moignard from the College of Arts advises museums, gives school talks, writes catalogue essays and curates exhibitions on a range of subjects relating to archaeology and objects.

On ancient topics, she has curated an exhibition of horses in the Parthenon Marbles at the Moray Art Centre, Findhorn. She is a member of a network at Edinburgh College of Art supporting a project on imaging of ancient burial imagery. Professor Moignard also gives study sessions and lunchtime lectures for Glasgow Museums’ Burrell Collections and the British Museum, as well as talks on the Iliad frieze at Holmwood House for the National Trust for Scotland.

Professor Moignard has written catalogue essays for the Scottish Gallery in Edinburgh, the Ruthin Craft Centre, as well as articles and reviews. She also gives talks on contemporary jewellery at the Glasgow School of Art, Edinburgh College of Art, and Hutcheson’s Grammar School in Glasgow.

Project Partners:
Moray Art Centre, Glasgow Museums, British Museum, Scottish Gallery in Edinburgh, Glasgow School of Art, Edinburgh College of Art, Hutcheson's Grammar School

Academic:
Prof Elizabeth Moignard


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Curating an exhibition on human-animal relations

Dr Sarah Cockram from the College of Arts has worked with academics from the University of Edinburgh and curators at the Talbot Rice Gallery and National Museums Scotland on an upcoming exhibition. The exhibition will explore the relationship between humans and animals before Charles Darwin. This exhibition relates directly to Dr Cockram’s work in History on the relationship between humans and animals in late medieval and early modern Europe.

Dr Cockram’s work often features images from early veterinary medicine texts, sculptures on animal tombs, and paintings of rulers with animals. She would like to pursue this connection between her work and the visual arts further in the future by commissioning new works of art that respond to early modern specimens and exhibits. 

Project Partners:
University of Edinburgh, Talbot Rice Gallery, National Museums Scotland

Academic:
Dr Sarah Cockram


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Visualising ancient archaeological sites

Archaeologists in the College of Arts are working with artists to produce visualisations of ancient archaeological sites through time. This work comes as part of research on the archaeology of Forteviot and Strathearn, where there is a concentration of prehistoric monuments as well as evidence for a major royal centre in the ninth century CE.

The visualisations have been done by a painter, David Simon, who has produced seven paintings in total. There are also some digital visualisations, which were created by Alice Watterson as part of her PhD.

The visualisations will illustrate the monograph on the excavations and be part of an exhibition at The Hunterian in 2015.

Project Partners:
David Simon, SERF

Academic:
Prof Stephen Driscoll


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Exhibiting photographs with poems

As well as teaching Russian visual culture, Dr Shamil Khairov is an artist too. His photographs have been exhibited recently in the Czech Republic, Germany and Poland, as well as shows in Scotland. Dr Khairov also gives talks for the general public about art and photography.

This autumn, Dr Khairov’s work was published in a Polish literary and art magazine alongside several poems written about his photographs. These poems were written by the poet James Sutherland-Smith and translated into Polish. James has written 34 photos in response to Dr Khairov’s work, and they hope to publish an album together of photography and poetry.

Project Partners:
James Sutherland-Smith

Academic:
Dr Shamil Khairov


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Writing catalogue essays on Impressionist Gardens

Professor Clare Willsdon’s research on Impressionism has led her to work with several successful exhibitions. She was Academic Adviser and sole catalogue author for the ‘Impressionist Gardens’ exhibition in Edinburgh and Madrid (2010) as well as contributions to other major exhibitions in Rome and Vienna. Together these exhibitions were seen by a total of 615,000 visitors. In Edinburgh, Professor Willsdon also encouraged collaboration with the Royal Botanic Gardens which added a scientific approach and resulted in spin-off events.

Currently, Professor Willsdon is a consultant for an exhibition ‘Painting the Modern Garden’ to be held in 2015-6 at the Royal Academy, London and Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio, with further catalogue essays and an exhibition for the National Gallery under consideration.

These projects enable galleries to give visitors access to new aspects of art history and up-to-the-minute scholarly research, as well as enabling Professor Willsdon to extend the understanding of Impressionism in her own field

Project Partners:
National Galleries Scotland, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Royal Academy, Cleveland Museum of Art

Academic:
Prof Clare Willsdon


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Giving gallery tours and videos on Italian artists

Dr Eanna O’Ceallachain’s research into the Italian writer Edoardo Sanguineti (1930-2010) has led to collaboration with the Nottingham Contemporary gallery.

In 2014 the gallery displayed work by the Italian artist Carol Rama, who was a friend of Sanguineti’s. Dr O’Ceallachain was invited by the gallery to do a walkthrough gallery tour of the exhibition to discuss the relationship between Rama and Sanguineti, based on several texts that Sanguineti wrote for her.

Following this talk, Dr O’Ceallachain was asked to record a short video based on the talk, which is now available on Youtube.

Project Partners:
Nottingham Contemporary

Academic:
Dr Eanna O'Ceallachain


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Interviewing graphic novelists, discussing the occult

Interviews with authors and public talks have resulted from Dr Christine Ferguson’s research into the graphic novel, Victorian spiritualism, and Neo-Victorian writing.  

In 2013, Dr Ferguson interviewed the artist Catherine Anyango about her illustrations for the graphic novel adaptation of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness (Eye Classics). In the interview, Dr Ferguson asked Catherine particularly about her process in adapting the novel and the ethics of representation in the case of Congolese people within the work. Catherine will return to Glasgow in January to discuss her ongoing graphic novel work.

Dr Ferguson has also spoken about her expertise in Victorian occult and spiritualist subcultures at the CCA (Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow) as part of their ‘Magick and the Occult’ symposium, aimed at the general public on Halloween 2014.

Researching this subject has made her aware of other British artists who she would like to collaborate with in the future.

Project Partners:
CCA, Catherine Anyango

Academic:
Dr Christine Ferguson


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Rehabilitating the reputation of Norah Borges

Norah Borges (1901-1988) is a visual artist who is often forgotten, in contrast to her much more famous brother, Jorge Luis Borges. The work of academic Dr Eamon McCarthy seeks to rehabilitate the high standing of an artist whose work was better known in the early twentieth century than her brother’s writing.

For the first time, Dr McCarthy’s research treats her work as a whole and tries to understand her evolving style and status as a woman artist. Dr McCarthy has given talks to the general public on this subject in Belfast and will do so again next year at the Instituto Cervantes.

Project Partners:
Instituto Cervantes

Academic:
Dr Eamon McCarthy


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Collaborating with galleries

For Dr Catriona MacDonald, an appreciation of the role that visual arts can have in the study of history has been enhanced by a number of collaborations. The foundations were laid when she acted as a consultant on the NationLive exhibition at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery. From there, a chain of events has led to further collaboration with NPG staff on poetry, song and Scottish history; a session with the artist Roddy Buchanan at the Edinburgh Book Festival coinciding with his residency at Edinburgh College of Art, and further engagement in material history as a Trustee of the National Museums of Scotland. Material sources have always been part of Dr MacDonald’s teaching – she leads a Masters field trip to Glasgow Life’s Nitshill depository every year – but recent collaborations have now infused her research with the insights that such objects and the visual arts can bring. This is recently evidenced in a publication for the University of Mainz, a partner university of the College of Arts, in which her work with the NPG was a core element. 

Project Partners:
Scottish National Portrait Gallery

Academic:
Dr Catriona MacDonald


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Robert Burns Beyond Text

In 2010, Professor Murray Pittock (PI) commenced work on the AHRC Beyond Text project, ‘Robert Burns: Inventing Tradition and Securing Memory, 1796 - 1909’. Research for this project was undertaken in collaboration with the University of Dundee, and with the support and partnership of the National Trust for Scotland Robert Burns Birthplace Museum; the Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery; the Mitchell Library in Glasgow; and two extensive private collections of domestic Burnsiana.

The project aimed to provide a model for the relationship between literary and material culture by creating a web-based catalogue of public monuments to Robert Burns worldwide erected by 1909, with a selection of images from the same period, combined with a web-based classification of the different kinds of Burns-related material culture available commercially or for domestic use. These datasets enable the whole range of images and items used in the transmission of Robert Burns' reputation into the sphere of cultural memory to be available for study or consultation in one place for the first time. This is a particularly important development, because Burns was one of the most commemorated of all poets, and the documentation of the full range of his memorialization through objects and public monuments provides an invaluable evidence base both for analysis and for the development of similar records of other writers. Among the key findings of the project were that the composure of personal and the creation of cultural memory can be found in the nineteenth century, and that the creation of the literary canon owes a great deal to the strategies for presenting public memory and its locations. The project’s findings on ‘Highland Mary’ were reported by the BBC, STV, The Herald and The Sun, being one of the top 10 university media clips in the reporting period.

In addition to producing the web resources and an extensive range of scholarly publications, the project team developed a series of exhibitions and events aimed at encouraging public engagement. The project RA, Dr Pauline Mackay, curated a ‘Treasure of the Month’ exhibition of Burnsiana for Glasgow's Mitchell Library. This was displayed in the Glasgow Room on Level 2 of the Mitchell Library from the 5th January to the 18th February 2011, during which time 120,000 people visited the library. Such was the success of the first exhibition that the team were asked to curate another exhibition for January - February 2013.

The project team also curated a larger exhibition, ‘Robert Burns Beyond Text', at the recently re-opened National Trust for Scotland Robert Burns Birthplace Museum in Alloway. This focussed on ‘Highland Mary’, and visitors had the opportunity to view some of the museum's treasures, explore the project website and also to examine our ‘handling kit' of Burnsiana: a sample of Burns memorabilia which was made available for close scrutiny. This exhibition ran from 7th March - 29th April 2011, during which time the museum had some 6100 visitors. As part of the 'Robert Burns Beyond Text' programme of events, and in collaboration with the National Trust for Scotland, the project team organised 'Burnsianarama' (Sunday 13th March 2011): an event that invited the public to bring their own Burns memorabilia along to the museum to discuss with members of our research team, and to tell them and other visitors how these object have helped them remember Burns. The event coincided with a public talk by Murray Pittock: 'Robert Burns: Statues, Souvenirs and the Making of Memory'. A further project-led exhibition of Burns medals and pottery from the 'Harry Kelly Pottery Collection' at the Hunterian Art Gallery, University of Glasgow was displayed from 17th November - 24th December 2011, while there were two smaller exhibitions at the Universities of Dundee and Glasgow.

The success of the project and the collaborations that it fostered contributed to the development of a new Honours level course by staff in the University of Glasgow’s Scottish Literature subject area: ‘Memorialising Scottish Culture and Literature’. As part of this course, students undertake a placement project in collaboration with Culture and Heritage partners. The long-term relationships developed as part of the project underpin collaboration between the University of Glasgow’s Centre for Robert Burns Studies, Burns Scotland (the National Burns Collection), and the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust as they work towards a celebration of ‘The Two Bards’ in a Burns and Shakespeare supper planned for 2016.

The project and its outputs, then, have contributed significantly to memory studies and to ongoing research and placement collaborations with culture and heritage partners, as well as providing a new methodology for analysing the relationship between writers, heritage and the visual arts.

For more information, or to browse the project web resources and images, please visit our web pages:

http://www.gla.ac.uk/robertburnsbeyondtext

 

Project Partners: National Trust for Scotland Robert Burns Birthplace Museum; Mitchell Library; Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery

Academics: Professor Murray Pittock; Dr Pauline Mackay


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Writers Residency - a rewarding experience

In the second year of his PhD, Dr Tim Barker was awarded a Writers Residency at the ZKM Centre for Art and Media, Karlsruhe.

The ZKM is one of the major venues for contemporary and media art in the world and in 2007 they held an exhibition titled You-ser, which include some major interactive and participatory artworks. As Dr Barker was working on the construction of interactive narratives in computer culture, this meant that the ZKM was a must-see venue. With additional funding from the University of New South Wales, the ZKM generously agreed to grant Dr Barker a residency, providing accommodation and an office to work in.

During his residency, Dr Barker wrote on the ZKM’s collection and the exhibition, which itself was a rewarding experience. But the most impactful part of the experience was thinking critically in an environment largely populated by artists and curators, which could not be done from an academic office.

Project Partners: 
ZKM Centre for Art and Media, University of New South Wales

Academic: 
Dr Tim Barker


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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