Performing and Visual Arts

Performing and Visual Arts

Performing and Visual Arts KE Case Studies

Performing and Visual Arts KE Case Studies

The Future of Ruins: Reclaiming Abandonment and Toxicity on Hashima Island

Professor Carl Lavery and his collaborators embarked on an ambitious cross-disciplinary project inspired by the ruin of Hashima, which was funded by the AHRC as part of the 'Care for the Future' scheme. Hashima sits deserted in the South China Sea and is considered an example of 'ruin porn.' Lavery and the team created a film which explored the sense of toxicity and temporality of Hashima. The project included partnerships with film-makers, geographers, cultural historians, and fine arts specialists. The objective was to encourage people to engage with ruins, to see it within its time and place and and learn from its environment, because ruins are not only crumbling castles strewn across the countryside, they are littered across our urban landscape too. The ultimate goal of the project is to get people to engage with their heritage and environment as a living process, and not fixed and permanent.

To find out more you can visit the project website.

Academic: Professor Carl Lavery

Partners: AHRC, Lee Halsall, Prof Deborah Dixon, Dr Carina Fearnley, Dr Mark Pendleton, Prof Brian Burke-Gaffney 

To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership of your own with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development Manager by email or by phone (0141 330 3885).


The Africa in Motion Film Festival

The Africa in Motion (AiM) Film Festival was founded in 2005 by Lizelle Bisschoff, then a PhD student at the University of Stirling and now an academic in the College of Arts. The festival programming has always been closely related to and informed by Lizelle’s research.
Filmhouse Cinema (Edinburgh) has been the main hosting venue for the festival, but in 2012 the festival expanded to Glasgow, screening films and hosting events at the University of Glasgow, the Glasgow Film Theatre, and the African and Caribbean Network.
So far AiM has screened around 300 African films to audiences totalling almost 20,000 people, as well as hosting Q&As with directors, panel discussions, workshops, African storytelling, and performances by African musicians.

Partner:
Africa in Motion

Website:
www.africa-in-motion.org.uk

Academic:
Dr Lizelle Bisschoff


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Build 'n' Burn

Dr Kenny Brophy has been collaborating with Northlight Heritage and the National Trust to organise prehistoric festivals featuring a fiery archaeological piece of performance art. The festival first took place in Brodick on the Isle of Arran in 2013 and it involved building a Neolithic wooden circle, using National Trust timber, and then burning the circle down as as a piece performance art. The aim of the event was to create an exciting event to engage and educate the audience about prehistoric rituals and life. Brophy gave a talk on Neolithic life and archaeology to accompany the event. Subsequently, larger events took place on Arran again in 2014 and then in Caithness, which featured a three hour long choreographed and scripted performance. In the future, Brophy hopes to generate greater impact by including prehistorical crafts and skills workshops, and potentially hosting a build 'n' burn event in an urban location.

Academic: Dr Kenny Brophy  

Partners: Northlight Heritage, National Trust Scotland 

To find out more about this project or to discuss developing your own partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development Manager by phone (0141 330 3885) or by email. 


Building Hero's Theatrical Automata

Dr Ian Ruffell, a senior lecturer in Classics and a specialist in ancient drama, has been collaborating with Dr Euan McGookin from the School of Engineering to build 'Hero's Theatrical Automata.' The automata is essentially an ancient performing robot designed by Hero of Alexandria, an ancient Greek mathematical and technical writer who offered instructions on how to build two different types of automata in a treatise. Ruffell discovered Hero's treatise in the university library and decided to begin a two year project to design and build the theatrical automata using Hero's instructions. It is being designed using SolidWorks software, following which it will be sent to the engineering department to be constructed. Ruffell enivsages future partnerships with puppeteers, to create figurines for the performace element of the robot. Secondly, he hopes to partner with schools, art galleries and museums so that the team can see how the public reacts and engages with ancient theatrical automata as a performance.

Academics: Dr Ian Ruffell, Dr Euan McGookin

Project Partners: School of Engineering 

To learn more about this project or to discuss developing your own partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development Manager by email or by phone (0141 330 3885)


Aldeburgh Residency

Purcell’s Revenge was the second Aldeburgh residency undertaken by the Concerto Caledonia in March 2013. The programme was partly researched and the performing material prepared by a College of Arts student.
The residency involved an extended rehearsal period for a group of 11 early music specialists and traditional musicians at Snape Maltings in Suffolk. Besides the preparation for a public performance there, the group was involved in coaching the Britten-Pears Baroque Orchestra of emerging professionals and postgraduate students, and made an outreach trip to the traditional music community based around the Ship Inn, Blaxhall. After the performance, the group spent a further day recording material for an album to be released by Delphian.

Project Partner:
Aldeburgh Music

Academic:
Dr David McGuinness


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Live Music Exchange

Live Music Exchange (LMX) is a an online hub for promoters, musicians, agents, researchers, educators, journalists, bloggers, local authorities, venue staff, policy makers and anyone with an interest in the live music industries. The website is the one-stop-shop for information about the live music industries in the UK.
Initially funded by the AHRC, LMX is jointly hosted by the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh. The website features regular blogs from industry personnel and opinion pieces by academics and others. Its services include training, mediation, events management and consultancy.
The project has involved collaboration with UK Music, Live Nation, the Scottish Music Industry Association, Edinburgh City Council, and Glasgow City Council.

Website:
http://livemusicexchange.org

Academic:
Prof Martin Cloonan


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Scoring for TV and Film

David has been engaged as a music producer and composer on five series of the TV drama series Skins, made by Company Pictures for E4/Channel 4 and for MTV in the US, working with a variety of artists including Gabrielle Aplin, Rae Morris, and the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain.
Music Performance students from the University, alongside students from Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and Glasgow Academy of Musical Theatre Arts, and the University-affiliated choir Madrigirls, have gained experience of media recording sessions.
Most of the recordings are made inhouse at the University, broadening staff skills in providing material for broadcast, and the music production processes have informed and directly contributed to the content of the Performance and Notation courses of the undergraduate Music programme.

Project Partners:
Company Pictures

Academic:
Dr David McGuinness


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Sublimation and The Lady from the Sea

An image taken from a performance of The Lady from the SeaThere are two distinct collaborations that together form a narrative of linked work in contemporary opera libretti. Production and success of Sublimation, a short opera co-written with composer Dr Nick Fells (GU), led to a further commission for The Lady from the Sea, a full length opera with music by composer Craig Armstrong. Sublimation was selected to travel to South Africa for performance by Cape Town Opera. The Lady from the Sea had its world premiere at the Edinburgh International Festival in 2012, as a key part of Scottish Opera’s 50th anniversary season.
Sublimation sold out at all its shows, to audiences totalling thousands of people. The production of The Lady from the Sea won a Herald Angel Award at the EIF 2012.

Project Partners:
Scottish Opera

Academic:
Zoe Strachan, Dr Nick Fells


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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What’s Next for Queer Performance?

>Photograph of a LGBT rainbow flag‘What’s Next for Queer Performance?’ was a public discussion event programmed as part of Glasgay!, Scotland’s annual celebration of LGBT culture. Chaired and curated by Dr Stephen Greer, the event brought together a panel of practitioners to explore the festival’s legacy and – in conversation with an audience of over 170 - look ahead to the future of queer performance. Amidst increasing – but by no means comprehensive – legal and social recognition of LGBT subjects across Europe, who or what might the ‘queer’ in queer performances stand for?
 
The panellists for the evening were Glasgow-based playwright and director John Binnie (whose work first appeared at the festival in 1998), award-winning writer Stef Smith (best known for 2010’s Roadkill, directed by Cora Bissett) and performer, writer and theatre maker Martin O’Connor (whose many collaborations include work with Scottish Opera and Glasgow’s Theatre Royal). The evening was opened with a provocation from Glasgay!’s festival producer, Steven Thomson.

Project partner:

Glasgay!

Academic:

Dr Stephen Greer


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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High-Slack-Low-Slack-High

‘High-Slack-Low-Slack-High’ was programmed as part of Glasgow International Festival of Visual Arts, 2012 and curated by Minty Donald. The project evolved as part of Minty’s practice-based research, which investigates site-specific performance as a means of exploring our (human) relationships with the environment - in thiscase, with urban rivers. Five artists (John Cavanagh, Minty, Douglas Morland, Nichola Scrutton and Hanna Tuulikki) created site-specific sound works in response to the tide cycle of the River Clyde in central Glasgow. The workswere performed at high tide at locations on or near to the river for five days during the festival. Nichola Scrutton, who recently completed a doctorate in Music at the University of Glasgow, included current Music postgraduate students in her performance while the project also involved undergraduate Theatre and postgraduate History of Art students in management and documentation roles. The five performances, plus a concert performance of all five sound works, which took place in the opulent, circular Edwardian board hall of Clydeport Headquarters, were witnessed by around 400 people. Audience responses suggested that the works had heightened and altered perceptions of the River Clyde, insinuating the rhythms of the Clyde’s tidal cycle into the fabric ofcontemporary city life.

Project partners: Clydeport, Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art.

Academic:

Dr Minty Donald


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Sacre du Printemps/Rites of Spring centenary: screenings and panel discussion

A photo of the panel discussion on Stravinsky’s Sacre du PrintempsOn occasion of the centenary of the first production of Stravinsky’s Sacre du Printemps and in cooperationwith the Goethe Institut Glasgow, Anselm Heinrich brought together and chaired a panel discussion on Sacre du Printemps in its current and historical interpretations and issues around originality, adaptation and translation at the Centre for Contemporary Art, Glasgow on 23 October 2013.

The event included a screening of a reconstruction of the original choreography by Vaslav Nijinsky (by Hodson/Archer) and of Sasha Waltz’s recent 2013 production, which was just at that time receiving its German premiere in Berlin to significant critical acclaim. Scottish Ballet’s Artistic Director, Christopher Hampson, was also invited to talk about his own choreography of the piece, which was premiering in Glasgow that autumn.

The panel consisted of Dr Lucy Weir (History of Art, Glasgow University), Christopher Hampson (Artistic Director Scottish Ballet), Jay Capperauld (composer), Richard Honner (Resident Conductor Scottish Ballet), Paul Tyers (Artistic Director BA in Modern Ballet, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and Scottish Ballet), and Dr Anselm Heinrich.

The event was attended by about 100 people, and generously funded by the GoetheInstitut Glasgow.

Academic Profile: Dr Anselm Heinrich

Partners: Goethe Institut, Alliance Française, Scottish Ballet, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, Centre for Contemporary Art


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Guddling About

Minty Donald, with her regular collaborator, Nick Millar, was invited to undertake a three-month residency in Calgary, Alberta hosted by the City of Calgary Department of Utilities and Environmental Protection (Water Services) and Department of Public Art in spring/summer 2013. The residency supported the artists in their investigation of performance practice as a means of exploring (human) relationships with water in the City of Calgary, focusing on the Bow and Elbow Rivers and their watershed. The Bow River and its tributary, the Elbow, run through central Calgary and are the city’s major water source. In June 2013, they were subject to severe flooding, which caused extensive damage and led to the evacuation of thousands of people from the city centre.

During the residency, Minty and Nick devised and carried out a series of public performances titled ‘Guddling About: experiments in vital materialism with particular regard to water’ which were intended to invite reflection on human/water relationships in the context of Calgary, following the June flood. The performances were witnessed by over 500 people and stimulated engaged, and lively debates on human/water interdependency. The residency culminated in a one-day ‘open studio’ event – an interactive public exhibition at Glenmore Dam, Calgary, which was attended by over 200 visitors.

Project Partners: City of Calgary Department of Utilities and Environmental Protection (Water Services) and Department of Public Art

Academic: Dr Minty Donald

 

Read more - Reach 04 Article


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Performing Bach and Handel

The historically informed performance of Handel’s Messiah by John Butt, an academic in the College of Arts, and Dunedin Consort became the best-selling production for the well-known independent record producer Linn Records. The records enjoyed sales of over £144,000 (20,000 copies). The combination of Butt’s historical performance knowledge and musical expertise gave the pieces an originality and freshness appreciated by audiences.

Dunedin Consort are currently Scotland’s leading baroque ensemble and the success of their recordings with Butt have meant that the group has expanded its performances and outreach activity, including several international touring opportunities. Dunedin Consort have won several awards and continue to make further recordings. 

Project Partner: 
Linn Records

Academic: 
Prof John Butt


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Celebrating Pantomime

The popular Pantomime in Scotland exhibition ran from 2008-2010 and toured across Scotland, reaching nearly a third of all people in Scotland. It was based on a research project of the same name by two academics in the College of Arts, Adrienne Scullion and Paul Maloney. The exhibition used archive footage from the National Library of Scotland and Scottish Screen as well as including memorabilia and audio recordings of memories of particular pantomimes.

Alongside the tour was a programme of free education and outreach events including talks, round table discussions, drama and art workshops and film screenings. Visitors were also encouraged to share their memories through reminiscence events. In collaboration with Scottish Opera and Glasgow Life, and the on-going support of the National Library of Scotland and Scottish Screen, Scullion and Maloney also produced a DVD and booklet Pantomime in Scotland: a celebration of Scottish Pantomime on film.

Project Partner: 
NLS, Scottish Screen

Academics: 
Prof Adrienne ScullionDr Paul Maloney


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Changing the face of Classics in theatres and museums

Academics in the College of Arts have worked with the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow to produce an original display of museum artefacts. With funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Board, Elizabeth Moignard and Richard Williams RA used 3D imaging and printing techniques to enlarge miniature 4th century Greek theatre masks into life sized objects.

The scanned ancient masks came from the Kelvingrove, the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, the Shefton Museum, Newcastle and the Museo Aeoliano Lipari, Italy.

The replicas made a significant contribution to the ‘Expressions’ display in the Kelvingrove and Moignard and Williams worked closely with curators to develop informative labelling for the display. Some of the reproductions have toured around Europe in exhibitions alongside videos of performances and have also appeared on stage. 

Project Partner:
Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum

Academic:
Prof Elizabeth Moignard


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Taking scholarship to the stage

An academic in the College of Arts was an academic advisor for the National Theatre of Scotland’s (NTS) production of Euripides’ Bacchae. Ian Ruffell was commissioned by the NTS to produce a literal yet modern translation of the play with a commentary for the playwright, David Grieg, to work with.

Ruffell played an ongoing role at rehearsals, which allowed the performance to bring the comedy of the play into focus without losing the meaning of the lines. The play reached audiences of over 30,000 in the UK and over 9,000 in New York.

Project Partner:
National Theatre of Scotland

Academic:
Dr Ian Ruffell


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Return To Battleship

Photograph of ruined buildings on Hashima Island ('Battleship Island'), an abandoned island off the coast of JapanA text/image performance, Return to Battleshipemerged from the AHRC funded project ‘Future of Ruins: Reclaiming Abandonment and Toxicity on Hashima Island’. The performance has played to a mixture of audiences in numerous venues in the UK and Argentina. The performance was funded by the AHRC and seeks to disclose knowledge about ecological futures. The performance is authored by the artist Lee Hassall and Carl Lavery.

Project partners:

The Nagasaki Institute of Applied Science, The Performing Garage, Worcester, Japan Foundation and the Oriel Gallery Aberystwyth.

Academic:

Professor Carl Lavery


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Writing an audio play from recorded conversations

Walking Interconnections is a collaborative research project with a team of researchers from the Universities of Bristol and the West of England, as well as 19 co-researchers from the disabled and environmental activist communities and supported by The West of England Centre for Inclusive Living.

The project used creative research methods to develop dialogues between disabled people and environmental groups, two traditionally separate communities. Co-researchers took one another on a walk of their choice, drawing maps, taking photographs and making audio recordings of their conversations.

Professor Deirdre Heddon then transcribed the recorded conversations and used their words to produce a 30 minute audio play, ‘Going for a Walk’. This play illustrates the resilience, creativity and determination of the participants. It can be downloaded (and taken for a walk) from http://walkinginterconnections.com/audio-play-going-for-a-walk/

Project Partner: 
University of Bristol, University of the West of England, The West of England Centre for Inclusive Living

Academic: 
Prof Deirdre Heddon


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Burning the Circle - A performative walk into the past

Burning the Circle was a performative walk created by Dr Cara Berger in collaboration with archaeology charity Northlight Heritage and the National Trust for Scotland.

The aim of the piece was not simply to transmit information to an audience in a creative form but to make use of the potential of performance to engage in sensate, affective and corporeal ways. Whilst walking through the landscape of Arran, the audience heard pieces of history, through the islanders’ voices, and Viking song. Reconstructed funeral pyres were both useful in research terms for experimental archaeology but also an opportunity to experience past rituals.

Working with people from different backgrounds allowed Cara to exchange perspectives and ideas with others to create a shared experience. 

Project Partner: 
Northlight Heritage, National Trust for Scotland

Academic: 
Dr Cara Berger


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Playing & Learning at Celtic Connections

Staff and students from the College of Arts participated in the opening concert of Celtic Connections in Glasgow in January 2015. The concert was a celebration of the composer Martyn Bennett and his final album ‘Grit’.

As musicians, members of the College of Arts played in the concert alongside violinist Greg Lawson, who prepared the piece for performance. The complexity of the notation used to prepare this unorthodox piece is of considerable interest, so Greg will be discussing the process with Dr David McGuinness and sharing the scores with undergraduates on the Notation course.

The diversity of research and expertise available within the College of Arts meant that they could contribute to the Celtic Connections project in a variety of ways. The concert itself was sold out and highlights aired on BBC Scotland. 

Project Partner: 
Celtic Connections

Academic: 
Dr David McGuinness


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Performing visitor engagement

Engaging Hidden Histories was part of a collaborative doctoral project undertaken by artist and doctoral researcher Tara S. Beall, working with Theatre Studies at Glasgow and The Riverside Museum of Transport and Travel.

The project was designed to increase the connectivity of the Riverside Museum with its new location, focusing on local communities and histories in Govan, and specific mobile communities. It aimed to develop new strategies for visitor engagement using creative events and performance practices. The project encouraged and enabled local publics to work collaboratively with museum staff, to gather research and develop activities.

The activities developed included: four trails connecting the Riverside Museum and Govan, a performative guided walk about women in Govan, research into the history of fairgrounds in the area including ‘Behind the Scenes of the Fair’ in December 2013. 

Project Partner: 
The Riverside Museum

Academic: 
Tara S. Beall


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Wild Life: an intergenerational ecological performance practice

Sarah Hopfinger is doing a practice-led PhD in collaboration with Catherine Wheels Theatre Company, focused on researching and developing an intergenerational ecological performance practice. The main piece of research involved collaborating with and directing an ensemble of eight professional and non-professional performers between nine and 60 years old. Together they createdWild Life – a live performance that is a choreography, meditation and celebration of wildness.

Wild Life is co-produced by Platform Art Centre and Catherine Wheels Theatre Company. It is has been presented to diverse intergenerational audiences including schools, community and youth groups, regular theatre audiences, and the general public in various contexts, such as the Only Human? festival at Glasgow University and Platform theatre venue in Easterhouse.

Project Partner: 
Catherine Wheels Theatre Company, Platform Art Centre, Only Human? festival

Academic: 
Sarah Hopfinger


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Only Human? Festival

A photograph of participants at the Only Human festival, standing by a park bench talkingOnly Human? was a two-day event which brought together researchers from film, geography, philosophy and theatre studies at University of Glasgow with non-academic communities. This festival of art and ideas explored what it means to be human, considered in relation to the nonhuman: animals, elements and environments.

Activities at the festival included talks, guided walks, films, performances and installations. Visitors to the festival described their experiences as ‘Illuminating’, ‘thought-provoking’ ‘challenging and new’. For more comments on the event, watch the video.

Project Partner: 
Only Human? festival


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Researching the Catalogue for the Lady Lever Art Gallery

In 2009, National Museums Liverpool launched a new online Catalogue of the Chinese works of art collected by industrialist and philanthropist, William Hesketh Lever (1851-1925) which now form part of the Lady Lever Art Gallery collection at Port Sunlight.
Academics at the College of Arts undertook the research for the Catalogue. The Gallery’s comprehensive archive documents Lever’s collecting activities and allowed the team to trace individual pieces back to former owners, including such famous names as James McNeill Whistler, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Lord Leighton.
Fully illustrated and freely accessible online, (www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ladylever/collections/chinese/) the Catalogue includes individual entries on each object and contextual essays, providing its users with a greater understanding of Lever the collector and this part of his collection.

Project Partners:
Lady Lever Art Gallery

Academic:
Prof Nick Pearce


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The Etchings Project

'The Doorway'(1879/1880), an etching by James McNeill Whistler, Hunterian Art Gallery The Etchings Project is a catalogue of the etchings of James McNeill Whistler, including a virtual exhibition. It contains many previously unknown etchings and identifies sitters and sites. It is fully annotated, illustrated, and linked to the online website of Whistler’s Correspondence.
The website is a major resource on 19th century art and the art market, and is accessed by art dealers, auction houses, curators, collectors, artists, students and public all over the world. Plans are now under consideration to extend the online website to include Whistler’s oil paintings and works on paper. Forthcoming exhibitions benefiting from this project include An American in London: Whistler and the Thames, travelling to London, Washington, and Japan in 2013-2014.

Website:
http://etchings.arts.gla.ac.uk

Academic:
Prof Margaret MacDonald


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Into The Workplace

Practical experience in the workplace is essential for today’s graduates. Through work placements and internships, History of Art and Museum Studies postgraduate students have completed tasks including cataloguing and photographing collections, enhancing databases and setting up Flickr sets for over 20 partner museums, galleries, historic houses and archives.
Additional outcomes have included creating surveys, collecting feedback from visitors, and assisting in or running events. History of Art’s partnership with organisations in Glasgow and further afield has not only provided students with the means to gain new skills and apply their knowledge in a professional work environment, but also contributed to the outcomes of the host institutions in a measurable way.

Partners include:
Museums, galleries, historic houses and archives

Academic:
Liz Hancock


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Spreading knowledge about ancient pots and contemporary jewellery

From ancient pots to contemporary jewellery, Professor Elizabeth Moignard from the College of Arts advises museums, gives school talks, writes catalogue essays and curates exhibitions on a range of subjects relating to archaeology and objects.

On ancient topics, she has curated an exhibition of horses in the Parthenon Marbles at the Moray Art Centre, Findhorn. She is a member of a network at Edinburgh College of Art supporting a project on imaging of ancient burial imagery. Professor Moignard also gives study sessions and lunchtime lectures for Glasgow Museums’ Burrell Collections and the British Museum, as well as talks on the Iliad frieze at Holmwood House for the National Trust for Scotland.

Professor Moignard has written catalogue essays for the Scottish Gallery in Ediburgh, the Ruthin Craft Centre, as well as articles and reviews. She also gives talks on contemporary jewellery at the Glasgow School of Art, Edinburgh College of Art, and Hutcheson’s Grammar School in Glasgow.

Project Partners:
Moray Art Centre, Glasgow Museums, British Museum, Scottish Gallery in Edinburgh, Glasgow School of Art, Edinburgh College of Art, Hutcheson's Grammar School

Academic:
Prof Elizabeth Moignard


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Curating an exhibition on human-animal relations

Dr Sarah Cockram from the College of Arts has worked with academics from the University of Edinburgh and curators at the Talbot Rice Gallery and National Museums Scotland on an upcoming exhibition. The exhibition will explore the relationship between humans and animals before Charles Darwin. This exhibition relates directly to Dr Cockram’s work in History on the relationship between humans and animals in late medieval and early modern Europe.

Dr Cockram’s work often features images from early veterinary medicine texts, sculptures on animal tombs, and paintings of rulers with animals. She would like to pursue this connection between her work and the visual arts further in the future by commissioning new works of art that respond to early modern specimens and exhibits. 

Project Partners:
University of Edinburgh, Talbot Rice Gallery, National Museums Scotland

Academic:
Dr Sarah Cockram


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Writing catalogue essays on Impressionist Gardens

Professor Clare Willsdon’s research on Impressionism has led her to work with several successful exhibitions. She was Academic Adviser and sole catalogue author for the ‘Impressionist Gardens’ exhibition in Edinburgh and Madrid (2010) as well as contributions to other major exhibitions in Rome and Vienna. Together these exhibitions were seen by a total of 615,000 visitors. In Edinburgh, Professor Willsdon also encouraged collaboration with the Royal Botanic Gardens which added a scientific approach and resulted in spin-off events.

Currently, Professor Willsdon is a consultant for an exhibition ‘Painting the Modern Garden’ to be held in 2015-6 at the Royal Academy, London and Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio, with further catalogue essays and an exhibition for the National Gallery under consideration.

These projects enable galleries to give visitors access to new aspects of art history and up-to-the-minute scholarly research, as well as enabling Professor Willsdon to extend the understanding of Impressionism in her own field

Project Partners:
National Galleries Scotland, Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Royal Academy, Cleveland Museum of Art

Academic:
Prof Clare Willsdon


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Giving gallery tours and videos on Italian artists

Dr Eanna O’Ceallachain’s research into the Italian writer Edoardo Sanguineti (1930-2010) has led to collaboration with the Nottingham Contemporary gallery.

In 2014 the gallery displayed work by the Italian artist Carol Rama, who was a friend of Sanguineti’s. Dr O’Ceallachain was invited by the gallery to do a walkthrough gallery tour of the exhibition to discuss the relationship between Rama and Sanguineti, based on several texts that Sanguineti wrote for her.

Following this talk, Dr O’Ceallachain was asked to record a short video based on the talk, which is now available on Youtube.

Project Partners:
Nottingham Contemporary

Academic:
Dr Eanna O'Ceallachain


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Rehabilitating the reputation of Norah Borges

Norah Borges (1901-1988) is a visual artist who is often forgotten, in contrast to her much more famous brother, Jorge Luis Borges. The work of academic Dr Eamon McCarthy seeks to rehabilitate the high standing of an artist whose work was better known in the early twentieth century than her brother’s writing.

For the first time, Dr McCarthy’s research treats her work as a whole and tries to understand her evolving style and status as a woman artist. Dr McCarthy has given talks to the general public on this subject in Belfast and will do so again next year at the Instituto Cervantes.

Project Partners:
Instituto Cervantes

Academic:
Dr Eamon McCarthy


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Collaborating with Palgrave MacMillan and the Live Art Development Agency

Professor Dee Heddon (Professor of Contemporary Performance) collaborates with the publisher Palgrave Macmillan as a committee member, reader, reviewer, and as the co-editor of the recently launched series of volumes, “Performing Landscapes”.

Dee is a regular contributor to performance festival publications, and she has also project-managed and co-edited a limited edition catalogue, The National Review of Live Art 1979-2010: A Personal History (Essays, Anecdotes, Drawings and Images). This was to both celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the National Review of Live Art and to mark its final festival- NRLA 2010.

Currently, Dee is collaborating with Live Art Development Agency on an edited edition which pays testimony to the work of performance artist Adrian Howells, a Fellow of the University of Glasgow from 2006 – 2014.

Dee’s collaborations contribute to the publishing and performance industries by identifying gaps in the existing offer and providing expertise and specialist knowledge of specific areas of performance practice, specifically live art and autobiographical performance.  Dee’s writing extends from academic research publications to more popular, informed survey pieces, for example for the AntiFestival in Finland. Such collaborations allow Dee to share her knowledge with wider public communities which have led, in turn, to further invitations to attend events, act as an artists’ mentor, and contribute to discussions and agenda-setting in relation to the fields of performance and live art.

Project Partner:

Palgrave MacMillan, Live Art Development Agency

Academic:
Prof Dee Heddon


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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