Digital

Digital

"Combine the Arts and the Digital and you have a powerful combination where we seek to understand problems better, work collaboratively, are flexible and adaptable and provide solutions that are enabling and innovative." - Dr Ian Anderson

The Arts and the Digital: A Powerful Combination

When working in a digital environment we often focus on the technology; whether its digital images, databases, social media or audit tools, outcomes are dependent on the successful completion of these projects. However, one of the main advantages of bringing digital expertise to problems is not the technology itself, but the process. When we approach such problems from a digital perspective we can go beyond the obvious benefits of being able to accomplish tasks more efficiently, manage larger amounts of information and communicate these across time and space.

The best digital projects force us to think from the outset more closely about the nature of the problem, the objectives we wish to achieve, how we are going to achieve them and how we measure success along the way. This may sound like traditional project management with its workstreams, dependencies and milestones mapped out on the ubiquitous Gantt Chart. There is an important difference, however, in that digital projects typically don’t work well this way, especially in an academic context. The work is neither static nor predictable enough to lend itself to a traditional ‘waterfall’ project management approach.

As research projects still need to come in on time, on budget and demonstrate reliable results how can we deal with this uncertainly? The answer is Agile Development, the ideas of which are beginning to be adopted in the business world as agile or radical management. In the arts scholars are used to dealing with uncertainty, the very problem being investigated may be hard to define, information incomplete and results hard to predict. Consequently scholars often adopt an iterative process of incremental gains, each small step yielding a return along the way to greater insights and understanding. This approach can also be found in software development and from where the term Agile Development comes – working in shorter, often simultaneous, cycles where requirements and solutions evolve in an adaptive, evolutionary and responsive manner. Combine the Arts and the Digital and you have a powerful combination where we seek to understand problems better, work collaboratively, are flexible and adaptable and provide solutions that are enabling and innovative.

Throughout the course of the coming month we shall be featuring our broad ranging expertise from the development of innovative preservation, management, and access strategies for blogs to the creation of learning aids for adult literacy.  We invite you contribute thoughts on how we can integrate better with the non-academic Digital community to create an environment of shared knowledge.

 

- Dr Ian Anderson


To learn more about Digital or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).


Digital KE Case Studies

Digital KE Case Studies

Blog Forever

BlogForever is building innovative preservation, management, and access strategies for blogs. The outcome of the project will be deployed as an exciting new information system for harvesting, preserving and managing blog content, facilitating the discovery of new insights through restructuring and reuse. The project involves 11 other partners from six countries across Europe, including diverse industrial partners such as Altec, Tero,  Mokono/Populis,  Cyberwatcher, Phaistos  and SRDC, as well as major research partners such as CERN , TU Berlin, University of Warwick, University of London Computing Centre , Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. Funding for the project has come from the EU co-funded Framework Program 7. HATII is a key partner on the project.

Website:

http://blogforever.eu/


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Design’s Digital Curation for Architecture

An AHRC funded project, Design’s Digital Curation for Architecture (DEDICATE) investigates, defines and tests policies, requirements and procedures to build a common sustainable framework for the curation of Built Environment related data.
In the DEDICATE project we collaborate with a select group of Scottish project partners from the communities of the main actors in the management and production of Built Environment, that is Architecture practices, Engineering consultancies and Building Control Authorities.
Recent national and international regulations enforcing the digital documentation of public works in BIM formats and the rising needs for authoritative and legal digital data management for the building elements manufacturing are going to be especially addressed by the researched framework. DEDICATE will finish at the end of August 2013.  Design’s Digital Curation for Architecture (DEDICATE)

Website: http://architecturedigitalcuration.blogspot.co.uk

Academics: Dr Ruggero Lancia, Dr Ian Anderson


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Data Management Skills Support Initiative

Training providers need tools to help them assess and evaluate the information literacy courses and resources they are producing. Students need to be able to identify the right information literacy course for their needs at the right time. Students and training providers looking to reuse course materials need easier ways to find and compare suitable courses and resources. To these ends, the JISC-funded project will test the RIDLs criteria for good practice as a means of self-assessing, describing and evaluating information literacy training; test Vitae’s Researcher Development Framework (RDF) Information Literacy lens as a benchmarking tool for learning outcomes; and develop an improved classification scheme and a Jorum ‘window’ into information literacy training materials using Jorum Powered.

Website: www.dcc.ac.uk/training/damssi-abc

Project Partners:

HATII Vitae, Research Information Network, Mimas



To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Digital Curation Centre

Active since 2004, the JISC-funded Digital Curation Centre (DCC) provides a world-leading centre of expertise in digital curation with a focus on building capacity, capability and skills for research data management. The DCC is comprised of a partnership between HATII at the University of Glasgow, the University of Edinburgh and the University of Bath. DCC works in partnership with many international organisations including the Research Data Alliance, the Digital Preservation Coalition, the Australian National Data Service, the Consortia Advancing Standards in Research Administration Information (CASRAI), the Coalition for Networked Information, Research Councils UK, the Library and Information Association of South Africa (LIASA) and CODATA.

Website: www.dcc.ac.uk


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Digital Repository Audit Method Based on Risk Assessment

Developed by HATII in partnership with the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) and Digital Preservation Europe (DPE) the Digital Repository Audit Method Based on Risk Assessment (DRAMBORA) methodology and toolkit was released in 2008. This toolkit is intended to facilitate internal audit by providing repository administrators with a means to assess their capabilities, identify their weaknesses, and recognise their strengths. Digital repositories are still in their infancy and this model is designed to be responsive to the rapidly developing landscape. A number of international partners were involved in piloting DRAMBORA including the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC), CERN the European Organization for Nuclear Research, the National Library of New Zealand, National Library of Sweden and National Library of France.

Website: www.repositoryaudit.eu/
 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Digital Design Curation

The Digital Design Curation (DIDECU) project ran between 2010 and 2011, was funded by the Scottish Government through a First Step Award, a grant of £5,000. This knowledge exchange project was aimed at transferring curatorial competences and procedures to an Architecture practice while evaluating both the feasibility and the adequacy in a medium sized commercial context of the audit tools and methodologies, policies and requirements established by the Digital Curation community.
This investigation resulted in an audit of the data held, the infrastructure implemented and the procedures adopted by the project partner, complemented by their correlated risk assessment, and in a complete preservation plan detailing policies, requirements and suggested procedures tailored to the project partners' procedural and technical context.

Academics:

Dr Ruggero Lancia, Dr Ian Anderson

External Partner:

Page/Park Architects



To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Preservation and Long-term Access through NETworked Services

HATII was a key partner in the EU-funded FP6 Planets project, which developed tools, approaches and courses to address the challenge of preserving access to digital cultural and scientific knowledge. The project involved 15 other partners from national libraries, archives, universities and technology companies throughout Europe, including IBM, The British Library, National Library of the Netherlands, Swiss Federal Archives and The Austrian Institute of Technology. HATII led the development of a testbed environment to evaluate tools and services as well as devising the Planets training programme, a successful series of events which raised awareness of digital preservation and the project’s solutions amongst memory institution staff from across Europe and beyond.

Website:

www.planets-project.eu/
 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Preparing Students for a Career in Translation

The technical part of the MSc in Translation Studies includes an introduction to computer assisted translation (CAT) software from SDL Trados. The company, currently the world leader in Translation Studies software, provides software and learning and teaching materials for students. The training prepares the students for employment in the fields of legal, medical, financial and manual translation.
Students take the online certification exams for SDL’s terminology and translation memory management software free of charge. These qualifications can really help a newly qualified translator to secure a wider variety of work.
Studying the technology has also provided interesting areas for research in Translation Studies as CAT tools are advancing at a fast rate.


External Partner:

SDL Trados

Academic:

Dr Georgina Collins



To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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TIMBUS

The Digital Preservation Coalition is a partner in a major European Research project investigating the development of Timeless Business Processes.  
The EU co-funded ‘TIMBUS’ project focuses on resilient business processes. It will make the execution context, within which data is processed, analysed, transformed and rendered,  accessible over long periods. Furthermore, continued accessibility is often considered as a set of activities carried out in the isolation of a single domain.
TIMBUS, however, considers the dependencies on third-party services, information and capabilities that will be necessary to validate digital information in a future usage context. It will deliver activities, processes and tools that ensure: continued access to services and software; and produce the context within which information can be accessed, properly rendered, validated and transformed into knowledge.

Website:

www.timbusproject.net/


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Linguists Assist English Teaching Technology

Expert linguists from the College of Arts helped launch a new instructional software programme to aid adult literacy and courses for non-native speakers of English.

Glasgow-based start-up company Micro-phonics Ltd developed a prototype of the programme using a First Step Award from the University of Glasgow. The next stage involved a partnership with Dr Jane Stuart-Smith (pictured) and Dr Rachel Smith from the School of Critical Studies, specialists in speech production, perception and regional and social accents, to test their product empirically and develop it for market.

‌The Micro-phonics Ltd software uses a combination of video, animation and images to blend individual elements of speech together to teach letter-sounds, handwriting and pronunciation.

The primary markets for the product are English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL), corporate, government or educational bodies. The non-profit sector will also use it for adult literacy and English language teaching programmes.

Colin Hamilton, founder and director of Micro-phonics Ltd, said: “Without the input from the College of Arts we would have found it very difficult to develop and test our product; Jane and Rachel brought a special academic rigour to Micro-phonics. The £5,000 from the First Step Award was an ideal opportunity to engage for a short period of time the College of Arts and to develop the foundations of a longer term partnership.”

Rachel also praised the scope of the project, saying: “Engaging with business such as Micro-phonics is an excellent opportunity for us as academics. Our research is very relevant to a variety of sectors such as businesses that are based around verbal communication and it is rewarding to be able to contribute directly to the development of such a dynamic company.”

Micro-Phonics Limited‌‌


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Gaelic Language Corpus

Within the College of Arts, two related research projects were established in 2006 and 2008 respectively: Digital Archive of Scottish Gaelic and Corpas na Gàidhlig. Both are funded by British Academy, Scottish Funding Council, Bòrd na Gàidhlig and the Scottish Government. They provide the primary materials for innovative research on the Gaelic language, future technological developments (including apps), and a comprehensive historical dictionary of the Gaelic language.
The College was also commissioned by Bòrd na Gàidhlig to research the development of Gaelic corpus technology. This resulted in a published report, which sets out recommendations and a roadmap for future development.
Academics have produced widely used Gaelic learning books and materials, as well as an annual literary journal: Aiste: Studies in Gaelic Literature.

Project Partners:
British Academy, Scottish Funding Council, Bòrd na Gàidhlig, Scottish Government

Academic:
Prof Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh



To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Online Scottish Corpora

Academics in the College of Arts have created two freely accessible online databases for written and spoken texts in Scottish English and Scots: the Scottish Corpus of Text and Speech (SCOTS) and the Corpus of Modern Scottish Writing (CMSW). They include a wide range of material from poems to research articles to the audio recordings of everyday conversations. Over 40% of information for these databases was crowd sourced from the general public and they now get an average of 36,000 page views per month.

The two corpora are being used in a variety of ways. They are useful for teaching students from primary to university level and since 2006 examination boards have taken texts from them for Higher and A Level exams. They are also being used to update the Oxford English Dictionary.

Project Partner:
Oxford English Dictionary


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Engaging the public through social media

The Scots Words and Place-names Project (SWAP), run by academics in the College of Arts, used social media to engage the public and collect data on the Scots language. Facebook and Twitter accounts were a platform for discussion and maintained the momentum of the project while encouraging others to input entries through the SWAP website. The public contributions were used to create a Glossary of Scots Place-name Elements (swap.nesc.gla.ac.uk), the first of its kind.

To engage school pupils, a competition was designed and advertised using Glow, the schools intranet. Teachers found supporting classroom materials useful and incorporated them into various learning activities. This interaction with schools has lead to an on-going dialogue with the educational body Learning and Teaching Scotland (part of Education Scotland) and academics are developing further e-resources with them.

Project Partner:
Education Scotland


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Developing a digital portal at Kelvin Hall

HATII in the College of Arts is involved with developing a digital portal as part of the Kelvin Hall redevelopment.

Kelvin Hall is a project that involves Glasgow Museums, The Hunterian, the University of Glasgow and the National Library of Scotland and it will bring together objects from the collections of each institution. The digital portal that the College of Arts is creating will allow users to search across all the collections to find information from each catalogue.

This isn’t as easy as it sounds, because at the moment each institution has different cataloguing practices and different ways of describing their objects. In order to bring the material together it must be standardised. This means that HATII must work closely with each partner institution to make sure that the right information is recorded and included.

Once this unified system has been developed, they will start to think about more exciting ways of representing the data of the catalogues. For example, they would like to produce geo-political maps representing the origins and history of the collections.

Project Partners: 
Kelvin Hall (Glasgow Museums, National Library of Scotland, The Hunterian)

Academic: 
Dr Ian Anderson


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Gaming in the College of Arts

HATII’s game studies course is one of the first to be offered by a Russell Group university. As part of our Digital Media and Information Studies programme, the course recognises the cultural significance of video games, and draws on multidisciplinary research from across the field of game studies. We consider games to be a vital area of study and, while the course is not vocational in nature, the involvement of industry experts in its delivery is essential to ensure that we remain at the cutting edge of current developments.
 
Our student game studies journal, Press Start, is also the first of its kind. The journal offers students from a wide variety of disciplines with the opportunity to publish their game-related work, while drawing on the expertise of an ever-expanding group of peers with similar interests.  HATII is pleased to be able to support scholars working in this new and exciting field, and to help develop the game studies researchers of the future.

 

Academic: 
Matt Barr


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Using Digital technologies in linguistic analysis

According to Dr Jennifer Smith, we are in the midst of yet another revolution in the analysis of speech data through access to Digital technologies. In order to analyse dialects, linguists still go out into the field armed with recorders, but these are now state of the art DAT machines which fit in a pocket yet provide studio quality sound.

New technology means that linguists are able to turn to a text to speech synthesised software in the creation of easily searchable corpus data. And they no longer need to plough through vowel measurements by hand, painstakingly coding each sound. Instead they can run the data through ‘forced alignment’ software which turns 200 hours of man hours into one hour of automated analysis.

Academic: 
Dr Jennifer Smith


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Students work with industry while they study

In the College of Arts, HATII (Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute) have been adapting their teaching programmes to prepare students for connecting with the twenty first century global community. The MA in Digital Media & Information Studies is unique in the UK in bringing together the study of, the creation, application and use of particular technologies, engaging human perspective on the issues of the digital age. Through this course, HATII prepares graduates for the opportunities and challenges ahead after they leave university.

Students have the opportunity to work with industry in all the years of the DMIS degree – with guest lectures from the BBC, Glasgow Life and other cultural heritage organisations, such as the Tall Ship. There are also internships with Glasgow City Council & opportunities with companies such as Edusport Academy to develop Web 2.0 marketing strategies.

Project Partners: 
BBC, Glasgow Life, Tall Ship, Glasgow City Council, Edusport Academy

Academic: 
Ann Gow


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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