Cultural Education

Cultural Education

The College of Arts has a strong knowledge base in the industry sector of Cultural Education. From local schools to multinational translation technology companies, our case studies highlight our past and present work with a broad range of public, private and 3rd sector organisations in this field. Get in touch to discuss how we might work together.

Cultural Education: Different People Giving Different Things To Different People

 

When a Scot sees Tintin in a kilt entering a Scottish pub we are amused. What we observe contradicts what we know because he is not Scottish, he is Tintin, and (in the original) he is speaking French. Cultural norms are being transgressed, but—or rather and—the effect is enticing. The reader based in Brussels or Paris might have a different reaction. The scene shows Tintin embracing the exotic: a less threatening exotic than that of Tintin’s previous trips to the Wild West, the Congo or the Far East, but exotic none the less. In knowledge of this reaction, our Scottish reader could then reflect back on Scotland and on how others see us, as we tease ourselves with the images we project elsewhere, displayed only too well as we opened the Commonwealth Games with Tunnocks Teacakes.

In short, the image is universal, but it gives different meanings according to the contexts of different languages and milieux, and of the cultures they carry. This may seem obvious to those who know Roland Barthes Mythologies, or failing that simply to those who have watched English friends in bemusement before an Irn Bru advert. Cultural education is all about making the most of this process.

In this case the process might be enabled by an exhibition, or even, in the long term, a National Comics Academy bringing together historians, sociologists, linguists, but also book sellers and artists. Alternatively, a project on the Italian Mamma can contextualise the generations of Italians who form part of Scottish enterprise and culture, a music performance might enhance our understanding of emotive responses to commercial tunes, or a film screening could bring the culture of others to a new market audience.

Billy Video

In all of these instances cultural education allows us to reach out to others, not just physically, but in terms of communication and seemingly shared common experiences. It is through cultural education that we can understand, accept, enjoy and profit from the fact that these common experiences might not be as entirely shared as we first thought.

- Prof Laurence Grove


To learn more about Cultural Education or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).


Cultural Education Industry Case Studies

Cultural Education Industry Case Studies

Scottish History in Schools Website

Launched in 2012, the History in Schools website has been developed by the College of Arts in consultation with teaching colleagues in the Scottish Association of Teachers of History and Education Scotland.
It aims to disseminate Glasgow’s history research to teachers and pupils in Scotland’s schools by providing open access papers, teaching resources, podcasts and website links. These can be used by teachers in planning lessons or by pupils in researching essays. The website is organised by topic, with general education topics for S1-S3 and SQA Higher certificate topics for S4-S6.
The team intends to add more themes, including Advanced Higher subjects, and to develop a more interactive website for sharing research, teaching files and ideas.

Project Partners:
Education Scotland, Scottish Qualifications Authority, Scottish Association of Teachers of History

Academic:
Dr Karin Bowie


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Translations at the Edinburgh Film Festival

Over the past 20 years, Margaret Tejerizo has collaborated with the Edinburgh International Festival (EIF) as a translator, cultural adviser and interpreter. The aim has been to “give voice” to many works over these years to national and international EIF audiences.
This has involved using Russian, Spanish, French and Romanian and resulted in productions with theatre directors and conductors such as Peter Stein, Calixto Bieito, and Valerii Gergiev, as well as collaborations with theatre and opera companies worldwide.
In addition to the creation and production of supertitles for many major EIF productions, original translations into English for EIF include “Faust”, (from Romanian), “The Invisible City of Kitezh” (from Russian), “December” (from Spanish) and many more.

Project Partner:
Edinburgh International Festival

Academic:
Dr Margaret Tejerizo


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Developing an Academic Programme with a Global Auction House

Christie’s Education and the University of Glasgow have been working together since 1987 when Juliet Kinchin was appointed as Course Director of the Decorative Arts Master’s programme within the then History of Art Department at the University of Glasgow. Juliet Kinchin is now Curator in the Department of Architecture and Design at MoMA in New York.
The success of this venture led to Christie’s Education establishing a Master’s Programme in London and Juliet’s successor, Ian Cox, was appointed as Director of the Master’s in Art, Style and Design (or Fine and Decorative Arts as it was then known). Ian Cox is now running the Christie’s Education New York Decorative Arts Summer School. Christie’s Education London became an Associated Institute of the University of Glasgow.

Project Partners:
Christie’s Education

Academic:
Prof Nick Pearce


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The Hunterian Associates Programme

At the core of the Hunterian Associates Programme is the notion that the cutting-edge research of our postgraduate researchers will connect in exciting and unexpected ways with the Hunterian’s extensive collections and create new opportunities for public engagement.
In 2012, HAP’s first year, eight postgraduate research students were successful and the subject matter of the resulting projects was wide-ranging: Japanese influenced art; the poem prints of Ian Hamilton Finlay; Paisley shawls; and Hunter’s book collection. These projects attracted new audiences through gallery talks, lunchtime talks, and creative writing events, as well as the addition of new resources to the website.
In 2013, the College welcomes 13 more Associates whose projects span a fascinating variety of interests.

Project Partners:
Hunterian Museum & Gallery

Academic:
Ruth Fletcher


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Paradox of Medieval Scotland

A group of academics in the College of Arts are paving the way to develop resources to support the teaching of Scottish History in the classroom.
A key part of this has been the creation of a vast database of 12th and 13th century Scotland: People of Medieval Scotland (POMS). The database has been designed for school children and their teachers, as well as academics, to use.
The database offers a new experience of engaging with the past, allowing thousands of individuals, and hundreds of places, to take centre stage.
Professor Broun adds: “From Dingwall to Dumfries, schools can investigate history that can be contextualized. Scottish History should look different in different parts of Scotland.”

Project Partners:
Education Scotland, Scottish Qualifications Authority, Scottish Association of Teachers of History

Academic:
Prof Dauvit Broun


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Raising Awareness of Islamic and Japanese Cultures with Children

Dr Saeko Yazaki has been influential in raising awareness of Islamic and Japanese cultures in Britain.
She organized the government funded ‘Contextualising Islam in Britain’ symposia in Cambridge, which discussed what it means to live as a Muslim in Britain today. A second report was published and launched in Glasgow in January 2013. This event involved police forces, city councils, Glasgow Life, Glasgow Forum of Faiths and a number of Muslim organisations.
In Glasgow, she teaches Japanese religion to Japanese children. Although not a subject usually taught in Japan, as it is an integrated part of Japanese society, it allows the children and the wider community to learn about Japanese cultural identity and experience traditional customs.

Academic:
Dr Saeko Yazaki


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Soillse - Gaelic Language and Culture

The College of Arts is a partner in the interuniversity project Soillse: The National Research Network for Maintenance and Revitalisation of Gaelic Language and Culture. Funded by the universities, Scottish Funding Council, Highlands and Islands Enterprise and Bòrd na Gàidhlig, the College’s research projects are in the area of corpus development, language planning, the acquisition of Gaelic by learners and how to measure language proficiency, and Gaelic broadcasting.
As part of the corpus development strand, the College has recently been commissioned by Bòrd na Gàidhlig to undertake research on ‘Corpus Planning for Gaelic’, which will set out the foundations for future corpus planning for the Gaelic language.

Partners:
Scottish Funding Council, Highlands and Islands Enterprise, University of Edinburgh, University of Aberdeen, University of the Highlands & Islands and Bòrd na Gàidhlig

Academic:
Prof Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Pilot Gaelic Language Initiative for Scotland’s Universities 2009 – 2011

In 2009, the College of Arts was funded to produce a Gaelic Language Initiative for the development of Gaelic language and culture amongst staff and students.
The University appointed the first Gaelic Language Officer in Scotland’s traditional universities. They developed an annual programme consisting of informal learning opportunities for staff and students, regular cultural events, and stronger links with the Glasgow Gaelic community.
A connected project, the Gaelic Language Residency Scheme, aims to provide young Gaelic speakers with the opportunity to live in a Gaelic environment and use Gaelic as their main language.
The success of the initiative has led to the creation of Gaelic Language Officer posts in the Universities of Edinburgh, Aberdeen and the UHI.

Project Partners:
Bòrd na Gàidhlig, Scottish Government, Scottish Funding Council

Gaelic Language Officer:
Fiona Dunn

Contact:
arts-ke@glasgow.ac.uk


Establishing professional competency standards for NHS chaplains

Heather Walton, an academic in the College of Arts, has contributed to the first competency framework for healthcare chaplains in the UK. Chaplains of all faiths are employed to offer care and compassion to patients, staff and others within the (secular) NHS.

The framework (‘Spiritual and Religious Care Capabilities and Competences for Healthcare Chaplains’) was taken up by NHS Scotland, England and Wales between 2008-2010, changing the ways of working of the 3-4,000 full- and part-time chaplains as well as having an impact on their patients and other members of staff in NHS hospitals. Walton’s influence is particularly evident in the framework’s focus on four key domains including reflective practice, which is her specialism.

Project partner: NHS 

Academic:

Dr Heather Walton


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Influencing HIV policy

Julie Clague, a lecturer in the College of Arts, researches the response of faith-based organisations to health and development in order to help increase the dialogue between these and secular organisations. As part of the Joint Learning Initiative (JLI), Clague has worked with the UN to examine the link between faith, maternal health, and HIV/AIDS development work. In 2011 she was a consultant for the Ecumenical Advocacy Alliance on the subject of the response to HIV at their meeting in Geneva and advised the Head of UNAIDS on his speech to the Vatican AIDS Conference.

Since 2000, she has been a member of the HIV/AIDS Advisory Group of CAFOD (Catholic Agency for Overseas Development), encouraging discussion and international collaboration. Through her research, Clague has educated staff and influenced HIV policy. In this way, Clague helps to empower Catholic responses to HIV.

Project Partner:
United Nations, UNAIDS, CAFOD

Academic:
Julie Clague


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Establishing the Medical Humanities movement

The research of academics in the College of Arts has changed the way medical students across the UK study. The College of Arts was the first to offer humanities modules to medical students. The importance of medical humanities for doctors and patients is now widely recognised and is offered by thirty of the UK’s 32 medical schools.

In Glasgow, academics collaborate with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde as part of the Glasgow Medical Humanities Unit. Creative Scotland has also funded further research into the healing environment and the role of visual arts in improving patients’ experiences, resulting in new modules being offered to medical students.

Project Partner:
NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Teaching Latin in Schools

Since 2013 the College of Arts has been collaborating with the UK-wide charity The Iris Project to teach Latin to children in Glasgow. In the first year of the project, three schools and over 90 children from Glasgow’s East End were taught by student volunteers from the Classics department.

Latin’s strict grammar rules and its connections to the English language help to improve literacy and aid the learning of modern foreign languages. Learning Latin also introduces children to the ancient world with themes such as Roman food, gladiators and Pompeii.

The teaching is also a fantastic opportunity for the Classics students to gain experience. In 2014, a further two primary schools were added to the project along with St Mungo’s Academy. 

Project Partner: 
The Iris Project

Academics: 
Jennifer HilderProfessor Matthew Fox


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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