AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Awards

AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Awards

Mapping and Measuring the Scottish Music Industry

Industry Partner: Scottish Music Industry Association

Deadline for applications: Friday 14 December 2018

Start date for PhD: 1 October 2019

Funding details: Tuition fees and annual stipend at UKRI rate (restrictions may apply, see eligibility and guidance notes)

Project Summary

The value of the music industry in Scotland has not been measured since Martin Cloonan, Simon Frith and John Williamson’s “Mapping the Music Industry in Scotland” report in 2003. Since that time the global music industries have faced dramatic technological, political, economic, and cultural disruptions. More recently, Creative Scotland commissioned a music sector review (conducted by EKOS in 2013) but did not have the scope to provide a detailed focus on specific challenges facing Scottish SME music businesses, nor was it able to take into account the impact of recent political disruptions such as Brexit and their impact on Scotland’s position and prospects in the international music industries.

The project aims to address these significant changes and the lack of Scottish-specific data on the music industries to map the current music industry ecosystem, measure its value and assess opportunities for growth. In addition, the student will carry out the following related objectives:

  1. assemble a dynamic online database of the music industry in Scotland.
  2. identify the key actors in the industry (e.g. Artists and Composers, Live Music, The Recording Industry, Media, Technology, Other Creative, Ancillary, Education and Retail) and analyze their relationship to one another within the wider UK and global music industries, as well as related international creative and technology industries.
  3. conduct comparative research that examines music industries in countries of comparable size and means (e.g. Sweden, Norway) and identify examples of best practice and gaps in provision in the Scottish context.

Eligibility

We encourage applications from students with the following qualifications and experience:

Qualifications:
- A first class (or equivalent) undergraduate degree, preferably in a subject relevant to creative industries research (candidates from across the arts, humanities, and social sciences will all be considered).
Applicants should also have a Masters-level degree that satisfies AHRC eligibility requirements for advanced research training, or equivalent professional/occupational experience. 

Experience:
- Prior experience in, and/or knowledge of, the music industries is desirable.
- Skills in quantitative and qualitative research, MS Excel, and web design are desirable but not essential.

Funding eligibility

To be eligible for a full award a student must have a relevant connection with the United Kingdom. A relevant connection may be established if the following criteria is met:

  • The candidate has been ordinarily resident in the UK, meaning they have no restrictions on how long they can stay
  • Been ‘ordinarily resident’ in the UK for 3 years prior to the start of the studentship. This means they must have been normally residing in the UK (apart from temporary or occasional absences)
  • Not been residing in the UK wholly or mainly for the purpose of full-time education. (This does not apply to UK or EU nationals).

To be eligible for a fees only award:

  • Students from EU countries other than the UK are generally eligible for a fees-only award. To be eligible for a fees-only award, a student must be ordinarily resident in a member state of the EU; in the same way as UK students must be ordinarily resident in the UK.

To be eligible you will also need to be accepted onto the relevant PhD programme via University of Glasgow Admissions.

Further details of funding eligibility criteria are available in the guidance notes on the SGSAH website.

How to apply

Applicants should submit a Curriculum Vitae, including contact details of one academic referee, and a 2-page covering letter outlining why they are interested in this collaborative doctoral award and what they would bring to this project.

This should be sent in an email to Matt.Brennan@glasgow.ac.uk and John.C.Williamson@glasgow.ac.uk by 14 December 2018.

Interviews will be held on 11 January 2019. Interviewing will enable the identification of a candidate who will liaise with the supervisory team and complete a full CDA PhD studentship application form by 13th February 2019, for consideration and final evaluation by SGSAH. Those successfully nominated will not be automatically funded.

Further information

If you have any questions, please email the Lead Supervisor, Dr Matt Brennan: Matt.Brennan@glasgow.ac.uk


The Impact of Moving Image Education on Pupils' Short and Long-term Leisure, Education and Career Choices

Deadline for applications: Friday 14 December 2018

Start date for PhD: 1 October 2019

Funding details: Tuition fees and annual stipend at UKRI rate (restrictions may apply, see eligibility and guidance notes)

Project Summary

The aim of this CDA is to investigate the short- and long-term impacts of organised Moving Image Education (MIE) on young people’s present and future lives, culture consumption, education and career choices.

For the past two decades Creative Scotland (now Screen Scotland, formed from the Scottish Arts Council and Scottish Screen in 2010) has provided teacher training, CPD, resources, in-class support and other MIE interventions in schools and other learning contexts across Scotland. This CDA will embed the doctoral researcher in Creative Scotland’s Film Education team under the supervision of Director of Film Education Scott Donaldson for 18 months, in order to gain a comprehensive understanding of the scope and impact of Creative Scotland’s MIE initiatives, programmes and provision, and the implementation of these in schools and as CPD.

The doctoral researcher will investigate the research question: what are the immediate and short-term impacts of MIE activities on pupils in Scottish schools today, as perceived by the pupils themselves and their teachers? This will be explored through participant observation of the work of the Film Education team; a series of case studies of ongoing MIE programmes in Scottish Primary and Secondary Schools; and semi-structured interviews with pupils and teachers. The doctoral research will also evaluate pupils’ digital, visual and textual literacy and analytic skills as well as their knowledge of various roles and career opportunities within the screen industries, with control groups of classes with no MIE provision.

Further, the doctoral researcher will explore the research question: what are the long-term effects of MIE? by comparing the present leisure and cultural activities, education choices and career trajectories of pupils who were involved in the formal MIE programmes and activities in earlier MIE programmes, notably Scottish Screen’s strategic MIE programme across all Angus schools during 2004-10, compared to their peers.

Today, the creative economy and the creative industries are seen as drivers of cultural and economic growth and increasingly the creative and cultural industries and in particular the screen industries take centre stage in Scottish, British and European economic, cultural and regeneration policies and strategies. It is therefore increasingly pertinent to understand if and how formal MIE informs and influences young people and their future leisure, career and education choices. If, as may be the case, MIE is transformative not only for pupils’ immediate literacy and analytical skills but also for their future trajectories, engagement with and appreciation of screen content (film, games, television, apps), mapping and understanding how MIE influences and enriches present and future lives are of great cultural, economic, and civic value.

This CDA holds the potential to potentially transform educational and cultural policy in Scotland and beyond by demonstrating and evidencing the long-term impact of MIE, and its role in shaping and informing the creative industries in Scotland and those who work within it.

Supervisory team:

Supervisor 1: Dr Inge Sørensen

Supervisor 2: Professor Philip Schlesinger

Supervisor 3: Scott Donaldson, Screen Scotland

Eligibility

Applicants should have a good undergraduate degree in relevant subject are or discipline including, but not limited to, Education, Film & TV, Film Making and Screen Production; Media and Communication, Cultural Policy & Creative Industries, and Art and Design.

Applicants should also have a Masters-level degree that satisfies AHRC eligibility requirements for advanced research training, or equivalent professional/occupational experience.

Candidates with prior experience of teaching or working in Moving Image Education are particularly encouraged to apply.  

Funding eligibility

To be eligible for a full award a student must have a relevant connection with the United Kingdom. A relevant connection may be established if the following criteria is met:

  • The candidate has been ordinarily resident in the UK, meaning they have no restrictions on how long they can stay
  • Been ‘ordinarily resident’ in the UK for 3 years prior to the start of the studentship. This means they must have been normally residing in the UK (apart from temporary or occasional absences)
  • Not been residing in the UK wholly or mainly for the purpose of full-time education. (This does not apply to UK or EU nationals).

To be eligible for a fees only award:

  • Students from EU countries other than the UK are generally eligible for a fees-only award. To be eligible for a fees-only award, a student must be ordinarily resident in a member state of the EU; in the same way as UK students must be ordinarily resident in the UK.

To be eligible you will also need to be accepted onto the relevant PhD programme via University of Glasgow Admissions.

Further details of funding eligibility criteria are available in the guidance notes on the SGSAH website.

How to apply

Applicants should submit a Curriculum Vitae, including contact details of one academic referee, and a 2-page covering letter outlining why they are interested in this collaborative doctoral award and what they would bring to this project.

This should be sent in an email to Inge.Sorensen@glasgow.ac.uk and Scott.Donaldson@creativescotland.com by 14 December 2018.

Interviews will be held on 14 January 2019. Interviewing will enable the identification of a candidate who will liaise with the supervisory team and complete a full CDA PhD studentship application form by 13th February 2019, for consideration and final evaluation by SGSAH. Those successfully nominated will not be automatically funded.

Further information

If you have any questions, please email the Lead Supervisor, Dr Inge Sørensen: Inge.Sorensen@glasgow.ac.uk


DeepLandscape: Integrating Artificial Intelligence into practices of archaeological landscape interpretation

Industry Partner: Historic Environment Scotland

Deadline for applications: Friday 14 December 2018

Start date for PhD: 1 October 2019

Funding details: Tuition fees and annual stipend at UKRI rate (restrictions may apply, see eligibility and guidance notes)

Project Summary

This PhD project aims to develop a method for integrating AI-led survey with contemporary topographic interpretation practices, and to reflect on the impact of the introduction of this new approach on professional practice. In the context of landscape archaeology and topographic interpretation, in order to take advantage of AI-led approaches, e.g. the automatic identification of features and changes, we must develop a framework for integrating AI into practices of archaeological landscape interpretation, a practice that is currently entirely based on individual visual observation. This requires a critical examination of our interpretive practices, interrogating the influence of our individual experiences, and asking how new interpretive practices might be developed.

The PhD project will take advantage of a pilot project on Arran, where AI-based automated identification of several classes of the islands archaeological features has been conducted within the framework of an archaeological survey of the island by Historic Environment Scotland (HES). The pilot study suggests that creating sound training sets for the identification of archaeological features in lidar topographic models is critical to the process of integrating AI-led approaches and contemporary survey practices. This task is particularly challenging because the identifications of training features are inherently highly interpretive and prejudiced by (expert) observers’ prior knowledge. To mitigate this, we must ask: How can we understand the relationship between what observers identify and what the AI identifies?

The project will have five main stages to study the relationship between human and AI led visual interpretations of topography: application of next generation DCNN methods: an exploration of deep net architectures and combinations of learned and defined features, and integration of multi-modal data-sets; method development for archaeologists’ fieldwork using AI-identifications; integration of archaeologists’ feedback; method development for archaeologists’ creating training data, and reflection on the impacts of AI methods on practice. Issues considered will include agreement between identifications by the deep net and archaeological professionals pre- and post- the addition of new training data, and responses to pre- and post- workshop surveys of archaeological professionals.

This project is embedded at HES and consequently will have direct impact on practice in Scotland. It uses lidar as its test data type, but the principles of the approach are readily expanded to HES’ archives of historic aerial photographic and more recent multi-temporal spectral dataset acquisitions and a variety of datasets increasingly produced through precision agriculture. The use of all these resources is limited by the shortage of expert human interpreters. This problem is critical, as national and international agencies responsible for the management of heritage and individual archaeological researchers working on a variety of questions from how ceramics represent trade to the role of charcoal production in the rural economy are looking to adopt AI led approaches to scale up their studies and address landscapes and assemblages as a whole, rather than through limited case studies.

The project will be formally co-supervised by Dr Rachel Opitz and Dr Jan Paul Siebert (University of Glasgow) and will include regular meetings and further supervision by Mr Dave Cowley (HES). The student will therefore be a member of both the Computer Science and Archaeology postgraduate communities at University of Glasgow and engage directly with the archaeological community at HES.

Eligibility

We encourage applications from students with the following qualifications:

- 1st class or equivalent Honours Undergraduate Degree
- 1st class / Distinction / Merit expected or earned in Master’s Degree

For non-native English speakers, applicants are required to meet the english language requirements.

A degree in Computer Science, Archaeology or allied disciplines are preferred.

Funding eligibility

To be eligible for a full award a student must have a relevant connection with the United Kingdom. A relevant connection may be established if the following criteria is met:

  • The candidate has been ordinarily resident in the UK, meaning they have no restrictions on how long they can stay
  • Been ‘ordinarily resident’ in the UK for 3 years prior to the start of the studentship. This means they must have been normally residing in the UK (apart from temporary or occasional absences)
  • Not been residing in the UK wholly or mainly for the purpose of full-time education. (This does not apply to UK or EU nationals).

To be eligible for a fees only award:

  • Students from EU countries other than the UK are generally eligible for a fees-only award. To be eligible for a fees-only award, a student must be ordinarily resident in a member state of the EU; in the same way as UK students must be ordinarily resident in the UK.

To be eligible you will also need to be accepted onto the relevant PhD programme via University of Glasgow Admissions.

Further details of funding eligibility criteria are available in the guidance notes on the SGSAH website.

How to apply

Applicants should submit a Curriculum Vitae, including contact details of one academic referee, and a 2-page covering letter outlining why they are interested in this collaborative doctoral award and what they would bring to this project.

This should be sent in an email to Rachel.Opitz@glasgow.ac.uk and Paul.Siebert@glasgow.ac.uk by 14 December 2018.

Interviews will be held on 16 January 2019. Interviewing will enable the identification of a candidate who will liaise with the supervisory team and complete a full CDA PhD studentship application form by 13th February 2019, for consideration and final evaluation by SGSAH. Those successfully nominated will not be automatically funded.

Further information

If you have any questions, please email the Lead Supervisor, Dr Rachel Opitz: Rachel.Opitz@glasgow.ac.uk


The Philosophy of Safety Engineering

Industry Partner: NASA

Deadline for applications: Friday 14 December 2018

Start date for PhD: 1 October 2019

Funding details: Tuition fees and annual stipend at UKRI rate (restrictions may apply, see eligibility and guidance notes)

Project Summary

Research questions: How do we establish that a system is safe? In looking at past accidents, what causal frameworks should we employ to analyse and report what went wrong? In looking at proposed systems, what methods of analysis and reporting should we use to establish confidence that it is safe enough?

Background: Safety Engineering is the discipline which aims to establish and improve safety in engineered systems. Classic successes of Safety Engineering include airbags and seatbelts in cars, residual current devices (RCD breakers) in home electrical systems, and airborne collision avoidance systems (ACAS) in aircraft.

It is easy to see that these developments improved the safety of the systems in question as they mitigated known and serious risks, but do seatbelts, RCDs, or ACAS establish that cars, electrical systems, or aircraft are now safe? This project will focus on two strands of this question: accident investigations, and ‘safety cases’.

Accident investigations provide an explicit case history of the causal assumptions and reasoning – i.e. the causal metaphysics – that engineers use to establish fault, and to inform future design. Contemporary metaphysics is well placed to assess, and critique, those assumptions in their practical context.

The term ‘safety case’ is used to refer to a disparate range of practices within Safety Engineering, and the methodology, and purpose, of such safety cases are ripe for philosophical analysis. One prominent form of ‘safety case’ is an explicit argument to the conclusion that a system is safe, and there is live debate within the Safety Engineering community about what should count as evidence and what should count as justification in this context. The resources developed through contemporary epistemology could contribute a great deal to such debates, and to the practice of producing a ‘safety case’ more generally.

With millions of components, and a low threshold for risk, aeronautic engineering is a prime example of where these epistemic challenges interact with value judgements in the practical sphere. NASA’s Formal Methods research team seeks to regiment and formalise these inferences in the aeronautic context, and to do so they need to take a stance on vexed issues of causation, explanation, evidence, justification, risk, knowledge, understanding, and value. This collaborative PhD project will investigate the role that contemporary epistemology and metaphysics can play in the work of these safety engineers.

The project has three primary aims:

  • Backwards: Analyse the case history of contentious accident investigations and identify the causal frameworks being employed. Are better approaches available?
  • Forwards: Analyse the epistemic assumptions in each of the disparate methodologies that are currently employed under the heading of ‘safety cases’. Is there a better model for producing ‘safety cases’?
  • Policy: Apply recent developments in philosophy, and new resources in Safety Engineering, to generate policy proposals in collaboration with NASA.

The targeted impact is to reduce accidents involving complex systems.

Project structure: The successful candidate will primarily be based at the University of Glasgow and will work closely with supervisors (Dr J. Adam Carter  and Dr Neil McDonnell). Subject to budgetary confirmation, it is anticipated that they will also spend a period of between six months, and one year, with NASA at the Langley Research Centre, working closely with C. Michael Holloway and colleagues.

The project will involve analysing the case history of accident investigations, and a range of so-called ‘safety cases’, with the aim of identifying, and defending ways to improve upon, the philosophical assumptions and frameworks that are being deployed.

The philosophical training most relevant to the backwards-looking dimension of the project will be in contemporary metaphysics, especially, the metaphysics of causation and metaphysical explanation, whereas the philosophical training most relevant to the forwards-looking dimension of the project will be in epistemology, especially, the epistemology of luck and risk, justified reasoning and epistemic normativity. 

The successful candidate will be expected to conduct the analysis outlined above, contribute to the writing of policy proposals in respect of the findings of the aforementioned analysis, and to write a philosophical thesis (70,000 – 100,000 words) within the broad topic area of the Philosophy of Safety Engineering. The resultant thesis may incorporate the practical policy-directed research, or be wholly theoretical, depending on the career ambitions of the candidate.

During the course of the PhD, the candidate will have the opportunity to—along with regular supervision by the project team—present work in progress at Glasgow’s Postgraduate Seminar as well as at Glasgow’s COGITO Epistemology Group Work in Progress Seminar, both of which are held weekly in Glasgow.

Eligibility

We seek applicants with a masters degree (or equivalent) in analytic philosophy. A demonstrable interest/competence in relevant topics in epistemology and/or metaphysics will be considered an advantage.

Funding eligibility

To be eligible for a full award a student must have a relevant connection with the United Kingdom. A relevant connection may be established if the following criteria is met:

  • The candidate has been ordinarily resident in the UK, meaning they have no restrictions on how long they can stay
  • Been ‘ordinarily resident’ in the UK for 3 years prior to the start of the studentship. This means they must have been normally residing in the UK (apart from temporary or occasional absences)
  • Not been residing in the UK wholly or mainly for the purpose of full-time education. (This does not apply to UK or EU nationals).

To be eligible for a fees only award:

  • Students from EU countries other than the UK are generally eligible for a fees-only award. To be eligible for a fees-only award, a student must be ordinarily resident in a member state of the EU; in the same way as UK students must be ordinarily resident in the UK.

To be eligible you will also need to be accepted onto the relevant PhD programme via University of Glasgow Admissions.

Further details of funding eligibility criteria are available in the guidance notes on the SGSAH website.

How to apply

Applicants should submit a Curriculum Vitae, including contact details of one academic referee, and a 2-page covering letter outlining why they are interested in this collaborative doctoral award and what they would bring to this project.

This should be sent in an email to Neil.Mcdonnell@glasgow.ac.uk and Adam.Carter@glasgow.ac.uk by 14 December 2018.

Interviews will be held on 11 January 2019. Interviewing will enable the identification of a candidate who will liaise with the supervisory team and complete a full CDA PhD studentship application form by 13th February 2019, for consideration and final evaluation by SGSAH. Those successfully nominated will not be automatically funded.

Further information

If you have any questions, please email the Lead Supervisor, Dr Neil McDonnellNeil.Mcdonnell@glasgow.ac.uk