AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Awards

How the Industry Speaks to Itself: Constructing a History of Television through the MacTaggart Lectures and the Edinburgh International TV Festival Archive

Industry Partners: The TV Foundation and the Edinburgh International TV Festival.

Deadline for applications: Friday 3 July 2020

Start date for PhD: 1 October 2020

Funding details: Tuition fees and annual stipend at UKRI rate (restrictions may apply, see eligibility and guidance notes)

Project Summary

Film and Television Studies at the University of Glasgow is delighted to invite applications for a fully-funded PhD studentship examining the history of the Edinburgh International Television Festival and its annual MacTaggart Lecture.

The project is a collaboration between the University of Glasgow and The TV Foundation, the charitable division of the Edinburgh TV Festival dedicated to supporting the television industry, and has been fully-funded by the Scottish Graduate School of Arts and Humanities (SGSAH) for a duration of 42 months. 

The project will address key developments that have occurred in television history (1976-present) through an examination of the Edinburgh International Television Festival archive and the annual James MacTaggart Memorial Lectures, a keynote address by a leading industry figure that forms the centrepiece of the Festival each year. Named after the Glasgow born TV producer, the MacTaggart offers a platform for important policy announcements and agenda-setting speeches. High profile speakers have included Dennis Potter, The Murdochs, and Michaela Coel. The EITVF archive and annual lectures offer a unique opportunity to examine the history of the festival and its role in shaping television history whilst scoping a new field of study on the ‘television festival’.

The selected candidate will be supervised by Dr Amy Holdsworth and Dr Lisa Kelly (University of Glasgow) and Campbell Glennie (Managing Director, The TV Foundation/EITVF).  The project will include work placements with The TV Foundation (based in London) and at the annual Edinburgh International TV Festival.

Eligibility

We encourage applications from students with the following qualifications and experience:

Applicants should have a good first degree (2:1) in a relevant subject (e.g. Film and TV Studies; Media and Cultural Studies; History) as well as an appropriate Masters qualification and/or relevant professional experience. 

Funding eligibility

This studentship is open to UK/EU candidates. EU candidates must have been resident in the UK for the past 3 years to be eligible for the full award.

Further details of funding eligibility criteria are available in the guidance notes on the SGSAH website.

How to apply

Candidates should submit their applications by the deadline to lead supervisor Dr Amy Holdsworth (Amy.Holdsworth@glasgow.ac.uk). All applications must include the following:

1. A covering letter (max. 1000 words) that addresses the following points:

  • why you wish to apply for this studentship
  • how you would approach the project
  • what you see as the advantages in working with The TV Foundation and the University of Glasgow
  • in what way your interests, education and existing knowledge make you well suited to undertake this project.

2. A copy of your CV

3. Sample of written work or professional portfolio

4. Qualification certificates/transcripts

5. Two references

Further information

If you have any questions, please email the Lead Supervisor, Dr Amy Holdsworth Amy.Holdsworth@glasgow.ac.uk


Assessing arts-based interventions for sustainable practice

Industry Partners: Creative Carbon Scotland

Deadline for applications: Friday 3 July 2020

Start date for PhD: October 2020 to January 2021, to be negotiated.

Funding details: Tuition fees and annual stipend at UKRI rate (restrictions may apply, see eligibility and guidance notes)

Project Summary

Tackling the climate crisis requires deep-rooted cultural change at all levels of society. Creative practitioners have begun to devise ways of using arts-based interventions to stimulate cultural and social changes with respect to environmental concerns, but there is as yet no common framework by which we can evaluate their longer-term effectiveness.

This project will observe a range of creative interventions, critically reflect upon them as both artistic creations and mechanisms for change within an Energy and Environmental Humanities framework, and develop a portable qualitative framework for the design and assessment of arts-based interventions.

To this end, this project embeds a researcher within Creative Carbon Scotland, a leading organisation in the field, in order to analyse arts-based interventions from a critical Energy and Environmental Humanities perspective and to monitor integration and investment into the interventions.

The overarching question behind our research is: 
What makes arts-based interventions effective in realising sustainable cultural and social changes at the local, institutional and regional level?

 The project will investigate the purposes and design of two or more artistic interventions; the relationship between the project and the existing social and expressive structures in the target community; the evaluation of the artistic intervention by the target community; and any changes in sustainable cultural and social practices arising from the intervention, including reflective and practical mechanisms for promoting further initiatives.        

In order to generate a rich set of data for analysis and comparison, two or more interventions operating in communities with distinct demographic and physical profiles will be selected. The researcher will undertake fieldwork within these target communities and as a participant observer within CCS. They will familiarise themself with: climate change and environmental policy; existing target community and institutional practices; relevant debates in Energy and Environmental Humanities; and previous arts-based interventions in the sector.

The researcher will be expected to carry out interviews and focus groups in order to assess community perceptions of the interventions; to document short-term changes in practice and evaluate procedures for stimulating organic development beyond the timespan of the intervention. Additionally, they will be expected to report findings for both academic and practice contexts that can form the basis of a portable toolkit for future interventions.

The ideal candidate will therefore be someone with knowledge of policy, social research and cultural and artistic practice. Please note that this is not a practice-based PhD.

Eligibility

The successful applicant will have:

  • a Master’s degree, or equivalent professional experience, in a field relating to at least one of the following areas: climate change and environmental policy; climate change adaptation; environmental humanities; social anthropology; creative arts
  • a broad grasp and awareness of current debates in energy, environmental and climate change policy
  • a broad grasp and awareness of the role of the creative arts in promoting cultural and social change
  • experience of, or demonstrable aptitude for, undertaking collaborative fieldwork and conducting interviews and focus groups within an anthropological/social scientific perspective   
  • experience of working with, or demonstrable ability to work with  different communities and a range of partners from different sectors
  • a demonstrable ability to undertake a comprehensive review of relevant literature and of existing cultural outputs and practice
  • excellent analytical and writing skills
  • a demonstrable ability to synthesise and translate technical research into practicable terms 
  • an ability to identify training needs 
  • a commitment to addressing climate change.

Desirable criteria include:

  • experience in organising a high-quality academic event
  • understanding or experience of co-design of artistic projects

Funding eligibility

To be eligible for a full award a student must have been ‘ordinarily resident’ in the UK for 3 years prior to the start of the studentship. This means they must have been normally residing in the UK (apart from temporary or occasional absences) AND (in the case of non-UK non-EU nationals) not have been residing in the UK wholly or mainly for the purpose of full-time education.

To be eligible for a fees-only award, a student must be ordinarily resident in a member state of the EU in the same way as UK students must be ordinarily resident in the UK.

How to apply

Applicants should apply by completing the application form and sending it to Dr Tom Bartlett

CDA Scholarship Application Form

Further information

If you have any questions, please email the Lead Supervisor, Dr Tom Bartlett


Valuing festivals as incubators of digital creativity – capturing the process of commissioning and presenting digital art

Industry Partners: NEoN Digital Arts 

Deadline for applications: Friday 3 July 2020

Start date for PhD: 1 October 2020

Funding details: Tuition fees and annual stipend at UKRI rate (restrictions may apply, see eligibility and guidance notes)

Project Summary

NEoN Digital Arts Festival, Directed by Donna Holford-Lovell, Prof Sarah Cook, Univerity of Glasgow, and Dr Drew Hemment, University of Edinburgh, are seeking outstanding practice-based research candidates for a collaborative doctoral award fully funded for three years by the SGSAH to start in October 2020. Prospective candidates should submit their applications by 3 July.

NEoN (North East of North) is Scotland's first digital art festival, based in Dundee. It aims to advance the understanding and accessibility of digital and technology-driven art and design forms and to encourage high quality within the production of this medium. For over ten years, NEoN has organised exhibitions, workshops, talks, conferences, live performances and public discussions and established itself as a platform to showcase national and international digital artists.

Over the past 30 years, digital culture festivals including NEoN have provided a key site through which the digital turn has been critically questioned and creatively explored together with diverse audiences. These festivals have incubated novel approaches and methods for commissioning, presenting and preserving digital art. However, their often grassroots character has limited the documentation and study of these phenomena. This project seeks to address this gap through a novel combination of archival/curatorial practice methods, evaluating how commissioning digital art at such events stimulates digital creativity and might secure the legacy of digital art.

The project has three key aims with distinct methods, subject to a decided research focus from the candidate:

a) Archival and historical research, including stakeholder interviews will consider the current public records of the activities of festivals that have previously commissioned digital art experiences. Alongside NEoN, this will also include a focus on FutureEverything (which Hemment founded in 1995 as the UK's annual digital culture festival) and case studies from a range of other festivals and new media or digital arts organisations, focusing on which commissions are valued and which not in the existing historical records, from the different points of views of makers/artists, curators and viewers.

b) Using practice-based curatorial methods and working within NEoN Festival, the researcher will seek to uncover the changing conditions of commissioning digital art experiences, identifying current good practices and testing forms of validation, such as forms of documentation, collaborative authorship, or audience feedback, crucially throughout all steps of the commissioning process.

c) Drawing together the archival work and the evaluation of the practice research, the project will identify and share ways in which festivals could work with the wider cultural sector to ensure the legacy of the digital art experiences they commission, leading towards concrete proposals for exhibition, collection, and preservation of once fleeting digital art experiences. This could inform plans for a national digital art collection, for example.

The project will investigate the implications for the practices of artists, arts professionals and cultural organisations, and also ways in which festival curation and arts practice can address the consequences of technological change for society at large.

Eligibility

We invite applications from candidates with a strong practice-research and academic background in curatorial/museum and gallery studies, cultural and creative industries, information and media studies, design research, art history (new media and digital art and design) and cognate disciplines, with archival / curatorial skills, with a clear and engaging research proposal that can be developed through the available research supervision.

The candidate must have an excellent command of English, both spoken and written. Successful applicants are expected to have a good first degree (at least 2.1, or international equivalent) in a relevant field of arts and humanities, and have obtained, or are currently working towards a Master's degree at Merit or Distinction level or international equivalent.

Funding eligibility

To be eligible for a full award a student must have been ‘ordinarily resident’ in the UK for 3 years prior to the start of the studentship. This means they must have been normally residing in the UK (apart from temporary or occasional absences) AND (in the case of non-UK non-EU nationals) not have been residing in the UK wholly or mainly for the purpose of full-time education.

To be eligible for a fees-only award, a student must be ordinarily resident in a member state of the EU in the same way as UK students must be ordinarily resident in the UK.

How to apply

Applicants should apply by completing the application form and sending it to sarah.cook@glasgow.ac.uk and neon@northeastofnorth.com

CDA Scholarship Application Form

Further information

If you have any questions, please email the Lead Supervisor, Professor Sarah Cook.