Dr Lisa Kelly

  • Lecturer in Television Studies (Theatre, Film and Television Studies)

telephone: 0141 330 4677
email: Lisa.Kelly@glasgow.ac.uk

Research interests

Lisa’s research is primarily concerned with the production and circulation of television, its broader economic and industrial frameworks, and the ways in which individual practices and institutional policies help shape the range and types of programming produced. Key areas of interest include television sitcom, global entertainment formats, and creative talent across the screen industries, and she was part of a research team examining film policy through a case study of the UK Film Council.

Lisa’s current research involves television and gender, with a particular focus on female talent onscreen and behind the scenes. She is the co-author of The Television Entrepreneurs: Social Change and Public Understanding of Business (2012) and The Rise and Fall of the UK Film Council (2015).

 

Biography

Lisa was appointed Lecturer in Television Studies at the University of Glasgow in 2015. Prior to this she was a Research Associate at the University’s Centre for Cultural Policy Research (CCPR) where she worked on two AHRC-funded projects.

She holds a BA(Hons) in Communication and Mass Media from Glasgow Caledonian University and an MPhil in Screen Studies and PhD in Television Studies from the University of Glasgow.

Grants

2013-14: Principal Investigator, ‘Shaping Scotland’s Talent: Change, Flexibility and New Pathways in the Screen Industries’, RSE Research Workshops Grant.

2012-14: Named Researcher, ‘The UK Film Council: A Case Study of Film Policy in Transition’, AHRC Research Grant.

Supervision

I welcome applications from new PhD students interested in all aspects of television studies as well as topics relating to creative labour, gender and representation, and media and cultural policy. 

Teaching

MLitt: Film and Television Core Course

 

Honours Option: Television Sitcom

Additional information

External Responsibilities

 

2013-14: Online Administrator for Critical Studies in Television: CST Online

 

Invited Talks, Conference Papers and Knowledge Exchange Events

 

‘“Sometimes it’s hard to be a woman”: Nashville as “Quality TV” or “Sudsy” Drama.’ Doing Women’s Film and Television Histories III: Structures of Feeling. Phoenix Cinema and Arts Centre, Leicester (May 2016)   

 

‘Difficult Women? Television Drama, Gender and the Quality Debate.’ Centre for Screen Studies, University of Glasgow (February 2016)

 

‘“Getting in” and “Getting on”: Working Cultures and Gender Diversity in the Television Industry.’ Media Management and Gender Studies Roundtable, University of Stirling (November 2015)

 

Creative Clyde Lyte Bytes‘In discussion with’ event, Film City Glasgow (March 2015)

 

‘Talent Spotting: Conceptualising the Film and TV Workforce in Scotland.’ Becoming Scotland: Screen Cultures in a Small Nation, Queen Margaret University (August 2014)

 

‘Identifying and Nurturing Talent: Best Practice and New Pathways in the Screen Industries.’ RSE-funded research workshop, NASUWT, Edinburgh (May 2014)

 

‘Conceptualising Talent: Privileging Change and Flexibility Onscreen and Off.’ RSE-funded research workshop, CitizenM, Glasgow (March 2014)

 

‘Shaping Scotland’s Talent: A Knowledge Exchange Project with the Screen Industries in Scotland.’ Beyond the Campus: Higher Education and the Creative Economy, AHRC Research Network, University of Glasgow (March 2014)

 

‘Professionalising the British Film Industry: The UK Film Council and Public Support for Film Production.’ Film and Media 2014 ‘Visions of Identity: Global Film and Media’, University of London (June 2014)

 

‘Film Policy in Practice: The UK Film Council and National Lottery Funding for Film Production.’ MeCCSA, Bournemouth University (January 2014)

 

‘White Girls, Black Girlfriends: Examining Race, Class and Gender in US Female Television Comedy.’ Console-ing Passions, De Montfort University (June 2013)

 

‘The Television Entrepreneurs: Audience Engagement with The Apprentice and Dragons’ Den.’ MeCCSA, London School of Economics (January 2010)

 

‘How television programmes such as The Apprentice work to normalise and encourage entrepreneurial activity in society.’ Creative Entrepreneurship and Education in Cultural Life, Columbia College, Chicago (July 2009)

 

‘Selling an Entrepreneurial Lifestyle: The Television Worker Onscreen and Off.’ The Big Reveal II: Lifestyle Television, University of Brighton (May 2009)

 

Everybody Hates Chris: Transferring Chris Rock’s Stand-Up Persona to the Television Sitcom.’ Playing for Laughs: On Comedy and Performance, De Montfort University (February 2008)

 

‘American Television in the Post-Network Era: Studying the Sitcom Output of HBO.’ Scottish Association for the Study of America (SASA), University of Edinburgh (March 2007)

 

‘From The Office to The Armstrongs: How the blurring of sitcom and reality makes for uncomfortable viewing.’ Scottish Media and Communication Association (SMCA), Perth College UHI (September 2006)

 

‘It’s Not Network Sitcom. It’s HBO.’ Screen Studies, University of Glasgow (June 2006)

Curb Your Enthusiasm: Performing the Real in Contemporary American Sitcom.’ Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association, Atlanta (April 2006)

 

Blogs and Online Journalism

 

‘What do we mean by (flexible) talent?’ CST Online (March 2015)

 

‘Hipsters on Eastenders? Shoreditch is so over.’ The Conversation (January 2014)

 

‘Television’s Difficult Women.’ CST Online (October 2013)

 

‘For us, by us? Gender, Privilege and Race in HBO’s Girls.’ CST Online (July 2013)

 

‘Casting The Wire: Complicating Notions of Performance, Authenticity and “Otherness.”’ Darkmatter (May 2009)

 

‘No Mean City to New Century City.’ Flow (September 2009)

 

‘Welcome to Psychoville: The League of Gentlemen and the Hitchcockian Sickcom.’ Flow (July 2009)

 

‘And the winner of Britain’s Got Talent is ...Flow (June 2009)

 

‘You’re Fired! Reflecting the Economic Crisis in the Business Entertainment Format.’ Flow (April 2009)

 

‘10 Years Younger: The Women Deemed “Too Old” for TV.Flow (February 2009)

 

‘Tears on TV.’ Broadcast (December 2008)

 

‘TV Tears: Learning Through Emotion in Popular Factual Entertainment.’ Flow (November 2008)

Publications

List by: Type | Date

Jump to: 2015 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008
Number of items: 8.

2015

Doyle, G., Schlesinger, P., Boyle, R., and Kelly, L. (2015) The Rise and Fall of the UK Film Council. Edinburgh University Press: Edinburgh. ISBN 9780748698233

Kelly, L. (2015) Professionalising the British film industry: the UK Film Council and public support for film production. International Journal of Cultural Policy, (doi:10.1080/10286632.2015.1015532) (Early Online Publication)

2013

Boyle, R., and Kelly, L.W. (2013) Television, business entertainment and civic culture. Television and New Media, 14(1), pp. 62-70. (doi:10.1177/1527476411435420)

2012

Boyle, R., and Kelly, L. (2012) The Television Entrepreneurs: Social Change and Public Understanding of Business. Ashgate: Farnham. ISBN 9781409403227

2011

Kelly, L., and Boyle, R. (2011) Business on television: continuity, change and risk in the development of television’s ‘business entertainment format’. Television and New Media, 12(3), pp. 228-247. (doi:10.1177/1527476410372097)

2010

Boyle, R., and Kelly, L. (2010) The celebrity entrepreneur on television: profile, politics and power. Celebrity Studies, 1(3), pp. 334-350. (doi:10.1080/19392397.2010.511135)

2009

Kelly, L. (2009) Casting The wire: complicating notions of performance, authenticity, and 'otherness'. Darkmatter,

2008

Kelly, L. (2008) Challenging sitcom conventions: from The Larry Sanders show to The Comeback. In: Leverette, M., Ott, B.L. and Buckley, C.L. (eds.) It’s Not TV: Watching HBO in the Post-Television Era. Routledge: London, UK. ISBN 9780415960380

This list was generated on Thu May 26 08:08:03 2016 BST.
Number of items: 8.

Articles

Kelly, L. (2015) Professionalising the British film industry: the UK Film Council and public support for film production. International Journal of Cultural Policy, (doi:10.1080/10286632.2015.1015532) (Early Online Publication)

Boyle, R., and Kelly, L.W. (2013) Television, business entertainment and civic culture. Television and New Media, 14(1), pp. 62-70. (doi:10.1177/1527476411435420)

Kelly, L., and Boyle, R. (2011) Business on television: continuity, change and risk in the development of television’s ‘business entertainment format’. Television and New Media, 12(3), pp. 228-247. (doi:10.1177/1527476410372097)

Boyle, R., and Kelly, L. (2010) The celebrity entrepreneur on television: profile, politics and power. Celebrity Studies, 1(3), pp. 334-350. (doi:10.1080/19392397.2010.511135)

Kelly, L. (2009) Casting The wire: complicating notions of performance, authenticity, and 'otherness'. Darkmatter,

Books

Doyle, G., Schlesinger, P., Boyle, R., and Kelly, L. (2015) The Rise and Fall of the UK Film Council. Edinburgh University Press: Edinburgh. ISBN 9780748698233

Boyle, R., and Kelly, L. (2012) The Television Entrepreneurs: Social Change and Public Understanding of Business. Ashgate: Farnham. ISBN 9781409403227

Book Sections

Kelly, L. (2008) Challenging sitcom conventions: from The Larry Sanders show to The Comeback. In: Leverette, M., Ott, B.L. and Buckley, C.L. (eds.) It’s Not TV: Watching HBO in the Post-Television Era. Routledge: London, UK. ISBN 9780415960380

This list was generated on Thu May 26 08:08:03 2016 BST.