Workers' Music Association

Workers' Music Association

This substantial collection of printed and manuscript materials was purchased by Janey Buchan from Dave Cope at Left on the Shelf, and has been lodged with the Political Song Collection for listing and making available to researchers.

The collection comes mainly from the papers of John Miller. Miller joined the WMA in 1940, conducted the WMA Singers from 1956 to 1962, and served as secretary, treasurer and finally as archivist. Some of the songsheets in the collection come from another source, but have been merged with Miller’s materials.

The collection consists of (in a very summary form):

  • WMA publications, including sheet music, song books, concert programmes, and general publications
  • Other sheet music and song books from organisations such as London Labour Choral Union,
    Workers’ Music League, ILP, Co-operative Party, and the CPGB
  • Materials by, and pertaining to, Alan Bush
  • Magazines and serials, including a long run of Sing, Sing Out,
    Recorded Folk Music (complete run), Folk Scene, Chapbook, etc.
  • WMA archive material including catalogues, bibliographies of political song, conference papers,
    cuttings and articles, correspondence of John Miller, photographs of WMA opera and singing groups, etc.

N.B. A full listing of WMA materials can be found on the Janey Buchan Political Song Collection Finding Aid.

 

No. Title Author, Artists, etc. Publisher Pub. Date Notes
1 Three Unison Songs Text translated from the German of Berthold Brecht. Music by Hanns Eisler LLCU [n.d.] 3 songs – In Praise of Learning; Report on the Death of a Comrade; The Party’s in Danger. “With accompaniment for trumpet, trombone, percussion and pianoforte.” Published for the London Labour Choral Library.
2 The Call to Freedom Words by Nancy Head from the original poem by Georg Herwegh. Music by Hans von Buelow LLCU 1930 “Unaccompanied part song”. Published for the London Labour Choral Library.
3 The International Words from the French E. Pottier. Tune by Degeyter. Arranged by Alan Bush LLCU [n.d.] “A unison song with accompaniment for pianoforte, organ, or brass band.” Published for the London Labour Choral Library.
4 The Pageant of Labour Words by Matthew Anderson. Music by Alan Bush [not given] [n.d.] “Chorus parts.” Manuscript. Note on final page “Written for the London Labour Choral Union to sing in the Pageant of Labour. May and June 1934”, Alan D. Bush.”
5 Red Front Words by Sylvia Townsend Warner. Music by Alan Bush LLCU 1935 “Chorus parts.” Handwritten “John Miller” on cover.
6 Labour’s Song of Challenge Words by Randall Swingler. Music by Alan Bush LLCU [n.d.] “For mixed voice chorus and unison chorus with pianoforte accompaniment.” Published for the London Labour Choral Library. Handwritten “John Miller” on cover.
7 May Day Song Words and music by Arthur Hurley LLCU [n.d] “For mixed voice choir with or without accompaniment.” Published for the London Labour Choral Library. Stamp of the Royal Arsenal Cooperative Society Limited. Education Department. Reference Library on cover.
8 Three Cheers for National Prosperity Music by Peter Baker [name for “Words by” blacked out] LLCU [n.d.] [Voice parts].
9 Youth at the Forge Words translated from the German of Jurgen Brand by Nancy Head. Set for unaccompanied mixed choir by Erwin Lendvai German League of Labour Singers. English edition by LLCU [n.d.] [Words only].
10 Youth at the Forge Words translated from the German of Jurgen Brand by Nancy Head. Set for unaccompanied mixed choir by Erwin Lendvai German League of Labour Singers. English edition by LLCU [n.d.] [Words and voice parts].
11 The Call to Freedom Words translated from the German of Georg Herwegh by Nancy Head. Set for unaccompanied mixed choir by Hans von Buelow German League of Labour Singers. English edition by LLCU [n.d.] [Words and voice parts].
N.B. Items 9,10,11 are paperclipped with a typed letter from Alan Bush to John Miller dated 22nd August 1980, headed “Deutscher Arbeiter-Sangerbund London Labour Choral Union”. Clearly in reply to a request from Miller for information about any links between the DAS and the LLCU, the letter covers Bush’s dealings with the DAS, but bemoans his lack of knowledge of any such links.
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Included in the WMA Archive are serials from the 1950s’ and 1960s’. A run of the very important magazine Sing is present [Sing contents listing].
The Archive also has copies of the Keynote Series of pamphlets published by the WMA in the 1940s’.
Please note that the catalogue is not currently showing all of the items in this collection as information is still being collated.

Serials

Title Holdings
Chapbook vol. 3 no. 1; vol. 2 no. 6.
English Dance and Song New Year 1961; Feb 1965.
Folk Music vol. 1 no. 8 – vol. 1 no 10 [1965?].
Folk Review vol. 1 no. 3 [1963?].
Folk Scene No. 7, May 1965 – no. 8, June 1965.
Il Nuovo Canzoniere Italiano no 1. – no. 2
Musical News and Herald Dec 1925.
Musical Times June 1944 – July 1944; Dec 1952; Feb 1953; April 1953; June 1968; July 1972.
Recorded Folk Music Vol. 1, Jan-Feb 1958 – vol. 2, Nov-Dec 1959. [complete run of this title]
Recorded Sound no. 13, Jan 1964 – no. 14, April 1964.
Sing vol. 1 no. 1, May-June 1954 – vol. 2 no. 6, Feb-March 1956; vol. 4 no. 1, April-May 1957 – vol. 4 no. 4/5, Dec 1957; vol. 5 no. 1, Sept 1959 – vol. 7 no. 4, Jan-Feb 1963; vol. 7 no. 6, Sept 1963 – vol. 7 no. 7, Oct 1963; vol. 8 no. 1, 1964 – vol. 8 no. 4, July 1965; vol. 9 no. 3, Aug-Sept 1966; vol. 10 no. 1, June 1967 – vol. 10. no. 4, March 1969.
Sing Out vol. 5. no. 2, Spring 1955; vol. 6 no. 4, Winter 1957; vol. 7 no. 2, Summer 1957; vol. 8 no. 1, Spring 1958; vol. 8 no. 4, Spring 1959 – vol. 9 no. 1, Summer 1959; vol. 9 no. 3 Winter 1959-1960 – vol. 9 no. 4 Feb-March 1960.
Singabout : Journal of Australian Folk Song vol. 1 no. 1, Summer 1956 – vol. 1 no. 4, Spring 1956; vol. 3 no. 1, Summer 1958; vol. 3 no. 3, Winter-Spring 1959 – vol. 3 no. 4, Summer 1959.
Spin vol. 1 no. 10.
The Musician : Voice of the Musicians’ Union Jan 1967.
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Series

Number / Date Author / Title
Keynote Series [Published by W.M.A.]
Book 1. Oct 1942 Moisenco, Rena / Twenty Soviet Composers
Book 2. [n.d.] Lang, Iain / Background of the Blues
Book 3. July 1943 Siegmeister, Elie / Music and Society
Book 4. [n.d.] Lloyd, A.L. / The Singing Englishman : an Introduction to Folksong
Book 5. [n.d.] Sear H. G. / The Composer Must Live
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The very influential Sing Magazine, with Eric Winter as Editor and John Hasted as Music Editor, began publication in May 1954 at a cost one shilling per issue. The Editorial in issue 1 states that the aim of the magazine is to distribute “as widely as possible, particularly among young people” the “songs which are produced in the course of man’s struggle for a better life”. The magazine will also print examples of songs from “the tap roots” of the folk tradition, together with “the traditions of classical and choral composition, of music-hall and popular music”. The links to the WMA is made clear from the outset – “The type of music that we print has, since 1936, been encouraged in Britain by the Workers’ Music Association and SING will always seek to work in the closest harmony with the pioneer WMA.”

 

Issue Details Contents
Vol. 1 no. 1. May-June 1954. Songs 1-8 The Atom Bomb and the Hydrogen; words and music by Leon Fung.

The Bird with a Leaf in Her Beak; words and music by Geoff Skeet.

On Top of No Smoking.

Robin Hood; the Boys of Mayflower School, Poplar.

Talking Rearmament; Words by John Hasted in the traditional talking blues style, spoken against guitar accompaniment.

I Won’t Clean Your Windows Today; words by Joe Balby, music by John Hasted.

The Ballad of Jomo Kenyatta; words by Johnny Ambrose, music adapted from the Negro folksong Poor Lazarus.

Ariran; a traditional Korean song, English words by Arthur Kevess.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook

Vol 1. no. 2. July-August 1954. Songs 9-17 Editorial : Ban the Bomb; the Rosenbergs Were Murdered.

Article : Letter from Irwin Silber, editor Sing Out.

Big Mouth; words by Ewan MacColl, tune traditional Welsh “Y Mochyn Du”.

The Seasons; words and music by Geoff Skeet.

The Rosenbergs Were Murdered; words by Eric Winter, music by John Hasted.

Short story : What More Could Anybody Ask; by Eric Winter.

In Contempt; words by Aaron Kramer, music by Betty Sanders.

The Rat; words by Harry Berlow, tune traditional.

Article : Singing History : the Story of Alfred Linnell.

Not One, Not One; words by William Morris, music by M. Lawson.

Article : A Folk Song of the Industrial Revolution ; by A.L. Lloyd [about The Poor Handloom Weaver].

The People’s Festival; words by Norman Buchan, tune “The Day we Went Tae Rothesay, O”.

This Land is Mine; words and music by Carlton Bailey.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook .

Vol. 1. no. 3. Sept-Oct 1954.

Songs 18-29

Editorial : Peace Hath Her Victories.

Ghost Soldier; written by an American negro soldier.

Johnson’s Motorcar; traditional Irish.

Article : Ballads and Blues at the Festival Hall.

When Asia Came to Geneva : a Tribute to Chou En Lai; words and music by John Hasted.

Book Reviews.

The Good Old Cause.

Article : All Hearts Shall Leap to See Our Country : the Folk Songs of Rumania ;by Hywel Hughes.

A Rumanian Shepherd’s Song; translated J.B.H.

Spring Hawthorn; Music : Ounoyevsky, words : Isacovsky, English words : Paul Fineborg.

Ballad of Ho Chi Minh; words and music by Ewan MacColl.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook.

Article : The British-Rumanian Friendship Association.

The Happy Engineers; words by Wal Hannington.

The Dove; words adapted by Ewan MacColl.

Conscripts, Forward!; words by John Hasted, tune : traditional “The Ball at Kirriemuir”.

Vol. 1. no. 4. Nov-Dec 1954.

Songs 30-41

Blow the Candles Out; traditional.

It’s Only Propaganda!; words and music Ewan MacColl, tune fairly traditional.

Where, O Where is Our James Connolloy?; traditional collected by Patrick Galvin.

Article : Songs of the Easter Rising; by Patrick Galvin.

The Foggy Dew.

Wee Prince Chairlie; words by Thurso Berwick, tune “The Fenian Chant”.

Blow Ye Winds in the Morning; traditional whaling song.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

Ballad of “The Aragon”; words by Jimmy Milligan, tune traditional (Eppis Merrie).

Chines Workers’ Song; collected in the Peoples’ Republic of China and translated by a member of the Birmingham Clarion Singers.

Editorial : Cecil Sharp in 1954.

When the Saints Go Marching In; negro spiritual .

Article : How to Lead Songs; by John Hasted.

[Note : “3 songs for the words of which young people are always asking us”.]

The Man Who Waters the Workers’ Beer; words by Paddy Ryan, traditional tune.

Jarama; tune Red River Valley.

Joe Hill; American union song, music by Earl Robinson.

Vol. 1. no. 5. Jan-Feb 1955.

Songs 42-53

Editorial : An Unhappy Blunder.

Send Them Hame! Words by Norman Buchan, tune “Aiken Drum”.

There was a Young Fellow who Swallowed a Lie; the Editorial Board

The Banks of Condamine; words in a version collected by Vance Palmer, tune collected by A.L. Lloyd.

Article : Freedom’s on the Wallaby ; Edgar Waters.

The Castlereagh; tune collected by A.L.Lloyd, words sung in the Bush – attributed to A,B, Patterson (“Banjo”).

Ballad of Stalin; Ewan MacColl.

Book Reviews.

A Room at the Inn; carol collected by William Sandys “Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern” (1833).

We Wish You a Merry Christmas; words and music : traditional West Country.

Hark the Herald Angels Sing : a Christmas short story from Hungary.

Jesus Christ; words by Woody Guthrie, tune : Jesse James (reprinted from Sing Out).

Twas on a Night Like This; Italian Christmas song. Taken down from the singing of Pete Seeger on a Folkways record.

Article : Songs my Mother Fought With; Dominic Behan.

Follow me up to Carlow.

Old Jackie Brown; words of this version from Fred Clausen.

The Conscript’s Farewell; words and music by Fred Dallas.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

Vol.1. no. 6. March 1955.

Songs 54-63

Editorial : Voices for Peace.

Billy Graham Go Home; music by John Hasted, words by John Hasted and Eric Winter.

Highlaws and Bylaws; words and music by Fred Dallas.

“Sing” Badge Award 1954.

Article : Music – and those who would march again; by Reszo Banyasz – translated from the Hungarian daily paper “Szabad Ifjusag” (Free Youth”.

Dig My Grave; taken down from the singing of Pete Seeger.

William Brown; traditional Woodcraft Song.

Three Lovely Generals; words : Johnny Ambrose, music : traditional.

Ballad of the Daily Worker; words and music by John Hasted.

Book Reviews.

Article : Guitar Accompaniment ; by John Hasted.

A note from our Mailbag.

Ballad of the New Poland; words and music by Ewan MacColl.

Ghost Army of Korea; Given to Ewan MacColl by Edgar Turner.

In Nineteen Hundred and Fifty Five ; words and music by Fred Dallas.

Blow the Candle Out ; from a broadsheet of Fortey [sic], Monmouth Court, Seven Dials, circa 185-, tune : Sing 4, song 30.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

Index to Volume One.

Vol. 2. no. 1. April-May 1955.

Songs 64-76

Editorial : International People’s Artists; by Johnny Ambrose.

Puttin’ on the Style; this version by Johnny Ambrose.

The Night we went to Lobby-o; Tune “The Day we went to Rothesay, O” (vol. 1, no. 2, song 16), words by John Horrocks.

Paddy West.

A Fireman’s Lament; arranged and set down by Redd Sullivan, the tune is a variant of “Poor Paddy Works on the Railway”.

The Greedy Landlord; this version by “a Skiffle Group”.

The Greedy Landlord ; this version by Fred Dallas.

With Henry Hunt We’ll Go; Traditional, tune ; “The Battle of Waterloo”, from Kidson’s “Traditional Tunes”.

Article : How I Wrote the “Red Flag” ; by Jim Connell.

The Swineherd; Hungarian, English version by Ursula McLean.

Keep a-Goin’ and a-Growin; words by A.L. Lloyd adapted from an American negro song.

Article : Jazzin’ for the People; by B.M. Letsky.

Hallelujah, I’m a Bum; words of first version are a little different from those which were popular in the Industrial Workers of the World. The second version is taken from George Milburn’s “Hobo’s Hornbook”.

Mailbag.

Ballad of Billy Graham; Thurso Berwick, tune Cosher Bailey (vol. 1, no. 2, song 9).

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

Vol. 2. no. 1. Supplement for Mayday. Songs 77-80 Which Side Are You On?

Hard Case; tune Hard Case Dartmoor Prisoner’s song, words Ewan MacColl.

Fare Thee Well Westminster! Tune “Prince Rupert’s March”, words Ewan MacColl.

Against the Atom Bomb : the song made famous by “Songs of Japan”; adapted from the Japanese song “O Let’s Never Allow Atomic Bomb” arranged by Koki Kinoshita (Central Chorus), English words by Ewan MacColl.

For Peace and Lasting Friendship; words and music by Ewan MacColl.

The Happy Engineers; words by Wal Hannington (Sing vol. 1, no. 3)

On Top of No Smoking; adapted by John Hasted from an Australian version (Sing vol. 1, no. 1).

Vol. 2. no. 1. 2nd Supplement. Election Special. Songs 81-86 Use Your Vote; adapted by John Hasted, original words by Louise Jeffers (People’s Songs vol. 3), traditional Blues.

Conscripts Forward; words by John Halsted, adapted from an earlier version (vol. 1, no. 3, Song 29)

Don’t Want to Live the Tory Way; words by John Hasted, tune “Stand and Face Your Lover”.

The Election Stamp; words Eric Winter, tune : “John Brown’s Body”.

On Top of No Smoking; adapted by John Hasted from an Australian version (Sing vol. 1, no. 1).

Tell Me the Old Old Tory; words : Johnny Ambrose, tune : The Old Grey Mare.

Tory-I, Tory-I; words : Johnny Ambrose, tune : “Villikins and his Dinah”.

Vol. 2. no. 2. June-July 1955. Songs 87-95 Editorial : ban the Bomb

Big Mouth; words by Ewan MacColl, tune : traditional Welsh “Y Mochyn Du.”

The Seasons; words and music by Geoff Skeet.

The Rosenbergs Were Murdered; words by Eric Winter, music by John Hasted.

Article : What More Could Anybody Ask? A short story by Eric Winter.

In Contempt; words by Aaron Kramer, music by Betty Sanders. Reprinted from “Lift Every Voice”, the Second People’s Song Book published by People’s Artists USA, 1953.

The Rat; words by Harry Berlow, tune : traditional. Reprinted from “Rebel Songs”, the songbook of the Australian Student Labour Federation, 1953.

Article : Singing History, the Story of Alfred Linnell.

Not One, Not One … , words by William Morris, music by M. Lawson.

Article : A Folk Song of the Industrial Revolution, by A. L. Lloyd. The song is “John o’ Grinfilt Junior”, a.k.a. “The Poor Cotton Weaver” and “The Four Loom Weaver.”

The People’s Festival; words by Norman Buchan, tune “The Day We Went To Rothesay, O’”

This land is Mine; words and music by Carlton Bailey.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook

Vol. 2. no. 3. August-Sept 1955. Songs 96-109 Editorial : A Hundred Words.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook.

Suliram; Indonesian folk song, arranged by Pete Seeger.

The Arbroath Tragedy; words and music by Fred Dallas.

Men of the Honest Heart; this grand Chartist song was written by the Birmingham meeting between Attwood and O’Brien, words by Ernest Jones.

It Was When We Went to Warsaw; words and music by John Hasted based on an idea by Jack Cooper.

Sto Lat; traditional Polish, English words by Miles Tomalin.

[Note: Songs 101 – 107, following 8 songs, headed “Songs for the Festival”].

A Bridge to the Right; music by Alfred Gradstein, English text by Honor Arundel.

A Mighty Song of Peace; words by John Hasted and Johnny Ambrose.

Freedom’s Song; music by Anatoli Novikov, English text by M. Wettlin.

The Bird With a Leaf in Her Beak; words and music by Geoff Skeet.

Sospan Fach; traditional.

Put My Name Down; music by Woody Guthrie, words : added to from time to time.

The Bogy; contributed by Norman Buchan, tune: “The Piper o’ Dundee”.

The Foggy Dew; traditional.

See You in Warsaw; words and music by Ewan MacColl.

Article : Nineteenth Century Street Songs; by Leslie Shepard.

Delia’s Gone; sung by Pete Seeger on a Folkways record.

Article : More About Guitar Playing; by John Hasted.

Vol. 2. no. 4. Oct-Nov 1955. Songs 109-119 I Love My Miner Lad; taken down in Yorkshire from the singing of Kete Haley and contributed by Gloria Leader.

Jarama; words by Alec McDade, tune Red River Valley.

Editorial.

Gannin’ to a Wedding’; we found the words in the Merseyside District YHA Songbook and the tune was contributed by Leon Griffiths.

Did You Hear About the Festival?; a dramatic presentation written by John Hasted, Hylda Sims and Eric Winter. [contains song 113, no title, tune by Jack Munro].

Kukuteczka; folk melody from Mazovia, arranged by Einar Kampp of the Youth Choir Umsgomdoret of Copenhagen, Festival version by John Hasted, English words by Eric Winter.

Szta Dzieweczka; traditional Polish, translated by John Hasted.

Last Train for the Festival; words by the West Indian Delegation to the Youth Festival, tune traditional.

Move Over; taken from Malvina Reynolds’ songbook “Song in My Pocket”.

The Bold Engineers; words by Wal Hannington of the AEU, tune : Army traditional.

The Hearts of the World’s People Beat as One; words by Chao Sze, music by Chu Hsi-hsien, English words by John Hasted.

Article : A Warsaw Notebook; by John Hasted.

Article : Nineteenth Century Street Songs; concluding the article by Leslie Shepard.

Story : A Sad Tale; by Poor Old Granuaile.

Vol. 2. no. 5. Dec 1955-Jan 1956. Songs 120-128 Mailbag.

The Streets of London; words by John Hasted, tune “The Roving Blade” traditional Irish.

Article : Khachaturyan Replies to Questions; by Aram Khachaturyan.

The Bold Irish Navvy; this version of “The Bold English Navvy” was collected in the Queen’s Arms, South Norwood by Russell Quay and Hylda Sims.

The Rabbiter’s Song; words and music by Stan Wakefield.

Editorial.

The Holly and The Ivy.

A Sprig of Mistletoe; words and music by Barbara Whitehead.

Poor Little Jesus; negro folk carol, reprinted from Sing Out.

Go Where I Send Thee; traditional negro folk carol, reprinted from an early People’s Song Bulletin.

Book Review.

Deep Blue Sea; reprinted from Sing Out.

Book Review.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

Lullaby, 1955; words and music by Johnny Ambrose.

Article : Plectrum Guitar Playing; by John Hasted.

Vol. 2. no. 6. Feb-March 1956. Songs 129-137 Editorial ; “And I’ve got a Song to Sing”.

Ben Abriham; words by Redd Sullivan, tune “Sweet Betsy From Pike”.

Feher Laszlo; Hungarian ballad, collected by Bela Bartok.

Article : Bela Bartok 1881-1945 : a Pioneer Collector of Folk Songs; by Ursula McLean.

The Foggy Dew (1); sung by Harry Cox, Norfolk and recorded by Peter Kennedy, 1953.

The Foggy Dew (2); sung to the well known tune.

We Try to Build The Union; words by Fred Dallas, tune “The Vly be on the Turnip”.

Smokers are Slaves; words by Barbara Whitehead, tune “McSorleys Twins”.

The Vly be on the Turnip; Kentish version of the famous Somersetshire song, collected by Mrs Joyce Margetts.

Article : In the Big Rock Candy Mountain … ; by Johnny Ambrose.

Book Review : Dominic Behan reviews Irish Songs of Resistance compiled by Patrick Galvin.

Article : Patrick Galvin Replies.

The Croppy Boy; words by W.B. McBurney.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

The Airman’s Prayer.

Index to Volume Two.

Vol. 3. no. 1. April-May 1956.

Songs 138-145

Lord, Bless Charlie Mopps. Charlie Mopps was collected by Redd Sullivan from the chief refrigeration officer on the S.S. Tekoa in 1953.

Venga Jaleo. A song of the Spanish Civil War. Reprinted from an early People’s Song Bulletin.

Article : Dorset Timbre.

The Oak and the Ash; taken down from the singing of Charlie Wills.

One, Two and Three; taken down from the singing of Charlie Wills.

Article : “A Death Song” Comes to Life; by Eric Winter.

Mayday in Padstow.

Differential Rent; words by Fred Dallas, tune traditional Northumberland version of “Nicky Tams”.

Wullie Brown; words by Iain Nicholson.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

Vol. 3. no. 2. June-July 1956.

Songs 146-155

The Young Sailor Cut Down in His Prime; taken down from the singing of Charlie Wills.

Article : Background to “St. James Infirmary”; by A.L. Lloyd.

Time That You Told Them to Go; words by Kenneth Younger M.P., tune ; “Oh! Dear! What Can the Matter Be.”

The Ilford Evictions; words by Fred Dallas, tune : traditional “The Oakey Strike Evictions”.

Living on the Fat of the Land; words and music by Elin Williams.

Article : Black, White and Broonzy; by Bill Broonzy.

Black, Brown and White; words and music by Bill Broonzy.

The Soldier’s Cloak; tune : traditional “Three Meet”.

Cave, Davy; words by Paul Jennings

Maybe We Ain’t Got It; words by Brother Wal Hannington, tune ; Brother Davey Crockett.

Tom Mann; words by John Hasted, tune : traditional Irish

Honest Charlie Always Pays; words by Eric Winter, tune : traditional Welsh “Y Mochyn Du”.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

Nuts About the Nut; words and music by John Horrocks.

Vol. 3. no. 3. August-Sept 1956.

Songs 156-163

Article : Why Were They Pop? Book review of “Seven Centuries of Popular Song.

The Sad Fate of William and Augustus; words and music by Elin Williams.

The Curd seller; words by Harindrinath Chattopadhya. Reprinted from Sing Out.

Article ; Festival in Paris; by John Horrocks.

The Ballad of Wortley Hall; words by John Hasted and Bill Leader, tune : traditional “The Limerick Rake.”

The Cobbler’s Song; collected by John Hasted and Hylda Sims from Louis Brown, of Burton Bradstock, Dorset.

Hora Pacii; Rumanian dance song from Magura, Cislau. Words by Lucia Habara, English words by Eric Winter.

The Red Petrol; words by David Thomas. Printed by permission of the BBC.

The Lure of the Mines; words by Merle Travis. Reprinted from Sing Out.

Article : L.Y.C. Wants “Song of London”

Article : How I Wrote 16 Tons; by Merle Travis. Reprinted from the Journal of the Mineworkers of the USA.

Payday at Coal Creek; transcribed by Ruth Crawford Seeger from the Library of Congress record AAFS 6B from the singing of Pete Steele, a former miner from Tennessee.

Article: Festivals; by Eric Winter.

Vol. 3. no. 4. Oct- Nov 1956.

Songs 164-173

The Great Majority; words and music by John Horrocks

The Longmore Lorries; words by Fred Dallas, tune “The Ball at Kerriemuir”.

The Great Historical Bum; words and music by Woody Guthrie.

Article : Songs my Mother fought With; by Dominic Behan

Father Murphy; traditional Irish.

Zum, Gali, Gali; Israeli song from The People’s Song Book, reprinted by People’s Artists.

Article : Staging a Living Tradition; by Eric Winter.

On the Piccadilly Line; words by Henry Morris.

Long John; words by Henry Morris

Article of a Legend; by Noteworthy. About Elin Williams.

Sing Happy Blackbird; words and music by Elin Williams.

Harry Was a Bolshie; words by Elin Williams, tune : traditional Welsh.

Article : a Life of Simple Joy; by Stan Wakefield.

Solidarity; words by Wal Hannington, tune “Galway Bay.”

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : How to Build a 3-String Bass; by John Hasted.

Vol. 3. no. 5. Dec 1956-Jan 1957.

Songs 174-185

The Stranger; words and music by John Manifold.

The Automatic Boss; words by Elin Williams and Eric Winter, tune : “McNamara’s Band”.

Article : Father Murphy’s Place in History; Stella Jackson joins issue with Dominic Behan’s article (vol. 3. no. 4, p.52)

Calvary Street; a Wobbly Hymn.

Everybody’s Happy on Christmas Day; American folk song

Sound Over All Waters; words by John Greenleaf Whittier, tune : Welsh traditional “Joanna”.

The Bitter Withy; traditional, contributed by A.L. Lloyd.

The Su-I-Ez Canal; words by Eric Winter, tune : “The Er-i-e Canal”.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

Article : How to Build a Lagerphone; by Brian Loughlin. Reprinted from Singabout.

Article : An American at the Court of Queen Elizabeth; by Nicky Thatcher.

Hard Times in Garlic Row; words by Stan Kelly, tune : “Durant Jail”.

Stanley and Dora; collected by Ron Gould of the Southerners, tune “Frankie and Johnny”.

Go Down you Murderers! ; words and music by Ewan MacColl.

Vol. 3. No. 6. Feb-March 1957.

Songs 186-195

Editorial : Singing Sailors.

The Quality of Mersey; words ; reconstructed by Stan Kelly from his childhood memories, tune : a cross between “It’s Only Propaganda” (vol. 1. no. 4. Song 31) and “The banks of the Condamine” (vol. 1. no. 5. Song 43).

Johnny Todd; traditional, collected and amplified by Frank Kidson in Traditional Tunes. Topic Record T7.

Go Down, You Blood Red Roses; words from 3 sources – Ted Close of Liverpool, Ted Howard of Barry and J. Hewett of Greenwich.

Long Time Dead; words and music by Martin Winsor.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

Article : Achievement : the Story of Twenty One Years; by Eric Winter [about the WMA].

Index to Volume 3.

I’ve Got a Little List; words by Eric Winter – a long way after W.S. Gilbert, music by Arthur Sullivan, and apologies to them both.

Article : This machine Kills Fascists.

They Whipped Him Up the Hill; John A. and Alan Lomax print in Best Loved American Folk Songs.

The Shark Song; words by W.J. (Jim) Mann, music by Jennifer Mann. Reprinted from Singabout.

Kisses Sweeter Than Wine; words by Paul Campbell, music by Joel Newman. Reprinted from Sing Out.

Trouble in Mind. The Negro spiritual “I’m Troubled in Mind” is probably the ancestor of this very popular blues number. Reprinted from Sing Out.

Van Dieman’s Land; this version collected by Ewan MacColl, taken down from the singing of Harry Cox.

Vol. 4. no. 1. April-May 1957. Songs 196-205 This Land is My Land; words and music by Woody Guthrie, reprinted from Sing Out.

The Ballad of Gregory Afxentiou; words adapted from a poem by Mervyn Jones, music by Fred Dallas, reprinted from Tribune.

[Note : next 3 songs are versions of “The Maid Freed From The Gallows”].

The Prickle-i-Bush; a south country version sung by Fred and Betty Dallas.

The Hangman’s Tree; collected by W. Newell from Emma M. backus of North Carolina.

The Gallows Pole; composite American version from the singing of Nicky Thatcher and Elizabeth Roche.

Article : Francis J. Child and the “Ballads”; by Fred Dallas.

Article : Jazz is Only Human!; by Eric Winter.

Article : Artists Everywhere Can Work Together For a Better World; by Eric Winter.

Book Review.

Record Review.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

The Wraggle Taggle Cool Cats; words by Martin Winsor, tune “The Wraggle Taggle Gypsies”.

Article : Concerning the Cimbalom; by John Leach.

Foweles in the Frith; very early English circa 1270, from the Douce Collection, Bodleian Library.

Nkosi Sikeleli Afrika; Bantu national song arranged by John Hasted.

The Methody Parson; collected by John Hasted from the singing of John Joseph Hill.

Vol. 4. no. 2. June-July 1957. Songs 206-213 Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

Talking Radiation; adapted from “Talking Atomic Blues”, last 4 verses added by John Hasted and Jean-Pierre.

The White Goose; Czech folk song from Wallachia, translated by Hanna Corbishley.

Mailbag.

Get Thee Behind Me, Satan; words and music by the Almanac Singers, reprinted from an early People’s Songs Bulletin.

An a’ That; words by “Luath” (wi’ apologies to Rabbie), tune traditional.

Article : The World Comes to Wales; by Elwyn John Ambrose.

The Llangollen Festival Hymn; words by Eifion Wyn, translated by T. Gwynn Jones, tune Welsh air “Joanna”.

Record Reviews.

Book Review.

Byker Hill; words traditional Northumbrian, tune appears to be an adaptation of “Hebrew Children” a southern United States revival hymn.

Book Review.

Macaffery; traditional Army song.

The Female Smuggler; taken from “Sea Songs and Shanties” W.B. Whall.

Vol. 4. no. 3. August-Sept 1957. Songs 214-223 Kalinka; words and tune : traditional Russian, English words by Eric Winter.

The Grey Goose; tune : traditional, words : a compound version some from the Lomaxes, some from Leadbelly.

Bottle Up and Go; words from various sources, tune adapted by Leadbelly, possibly written by Tamper Red.

Article : I Knew Leadbelly; by Pete Seeger.

The Commissioner’s Report; words and music by Attila the Hun (Raymond Quevedo), reprinted from Sing Out.

Hoist the Window; negro spiritual.

A Mighty Song of Peace; words by John Hasted and Johnny Ambrose, tune : fairly traditional. Song 102 reprinted from Vol. 2, No. 3.

Song of the Gillie More; words and traditional tune arranged by Hamish Henderson. Reprinted from “The New Reasoner”.

Freedom Song : the Song of the World Federation of Democratic Youth; music by Anatoli Novikov, English text by M. Wettlin. Song 103 reprinted from Sing Vol. 2, No. 3.

The Family of Man; words and music by Fred Dallas. Inspired by the “Picture Post” exhibition of 1956.

The Bird With a Leaf in Her Beak; words and music by Geoff Skeet. Song 2 reprinted from Sing Vol. 1, No. 1.

The Hammer Song; words and music by Lee Hays and Pete Seeger. Reprinted from Sing Out. Adapted by John Hasted.

Lord Franklin; collected by A.L. Lloyd.

Put My Name Down; music by Woody Guthrie, words : added to from time to time. Song 105 reprinted from Sing Vol. 2, No. 3.

Record Reviews.

Editorial : “Times is Getting Hard”.

Article : A Llangollen Notebook; by Fred and Betty Dallas.

The Wild Colonial Boy; collected by Malcolm Ellis. Reprinted from Singabout.

Vol. 4. no. 4. and no. 5. Dec 1957. Songs 224-241 Talking Union; words by the Almanac Singers. Talking blues. Reprinted from the first People’s Song Book.

Come All Ye Fair and Tender Ladies; as sung by Peggy Seeger on Topic record 10T9.

The Lowlands o’ Holland; words : traditional, tune by Rory and Alex McEwan.

The Plodder Seam; words and music by Ewan MacColl, as sung on Topic record 10T13.

Little Bird; American children’s song as sung by Peggy Seeger on Topic record 7T18.

Record Reviews.

Editorial : Progress (?) Report.

Made in Britain; comments on the English Folk Music Festival by A.L. Lloyd, Eric Winter, Fred and Betty Dallas.

Child of God; as sung by Peggy Seeger on Topic record TRC108.

The Virgin Mary Had a Baby Boy; traditional West Indian carol.

The Twelve Days of Christmas; traditional Hampshire version.

The Son of Man; words by Dominic Behan, tune : Dunlaven Green.

Book Reviews.

Mailbag.

Chop and Change; the folk process … the living tradition, a selection of new songs and parodies [words of 4 protest songs, with notes].

Talking Moscow; traditional talking blues, words : a composite of the versions by John Hasted, John Holly and Leon Rosselson.

Nicotine Blues; words and music by Martin Winsor.

The Bold Thady Quill; traditional Irish.

The 1913 Massacre; words and music by Woody Guthrie.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

Vol. 5. no. 1. Sept 1959. [Burns Bicentenary].

The Shining Birch Tree; words by Wade Hamsworth, music from Sing Out.

The Patriot Game; words and music adapted from traditional airs by Dominic Behan.

First Things First; words by Alex Comfort, music by John Hasted and Eric Winter.

The Village Pump; a version compiled by John Hasted from Louis Brown and Frank Ogradovitch.

Book Reviews.

What’s On and Who’s Singing.

Article : Robert Burns : The Man’s the Gowd.

Rantin’ Rovin’ Robin; words by Robert Burns, tune: “O Gin Ye Were Deid, Guidman”.

A Red Red Rose; words by Robert Burns, tune : “Low Down He’s in the Broom”.

My Love She’s But a Lassie Yet; words by Robert Burns, tune ; “Put Up Your Dagger, Jamie”.

A Man’s a Man For A’ That; words by Robert Burns.

A Singer’s Notebook; by John Hasted.

Record Reviews.

The Notting Hill Murder; words and music by Fred Dallas.

The Second Front; tune “Musselburgh Fair”, the words of this song are ascribed to a group of English soldiers, serving in a regiment of the Black Watch.

Jimmy Wilson; words and music by Peggy Seeger and Ewan MacColl.

Black and White; words by Alan Roberts, music by Earl Robinson. Reprinted from Sing Out.

MacPherson’s Farewell; traditional Scottish. Reprinted from “Scotland Sings”.

Vol. 5. no. 2. Dec 1959. What’s On and Who’s Singing.

A Singer’s Notebook; by Peter Kennedy.

A Soldier’s Life is Sad; words and music by John Comley.

The Lure of TV; words by Tony Davis, tune : “The Lure of the Mines” (Sing, Vol. 3, No. 3).

The Distressed Men o’ War; traditional English.

The Topman and the Afterguard; traditional English.

Jack Tar; traditional English.

The Bells of Rhymney; words by Idris Davies, music by Pete Seeger. Reprinted from Sing Out.

Oh, Had I a Golden Thread; Pete Seeger. Reprinted from Sing Out.

Sandgate Dandling Song; words by Robert Nunn, tune : traditional Tyneside, “Dollia”.

Liverpool Lullaby; words by Stan Kelly, tune : “Dollia”.

Article : The Steel Band Music of the West Indies; by R. Darcy Best.

The Bullocky’s Joke; words and music by Stan Wakefield.

Mary, What You Gonna name That Pretty Little Baby? A negro Christmas song sung by Peggy Seeger on Topic TOP38.

The Card Playing Song; collected by Frank Kidson from a soldier who had learned it in India in the 1850’s.

A Reel of Recording Tape; words by Sydney Carter, tune : “The Dundee Weaver”.

Book Reviews.

The Miller’s Daughter; traditional Danish arranged by Wendy Edwards from the original arrangement by Einar Kampp; English words by Wendy Edwards and Karl Hover.

Finnegan’s Wake; Dublin street song, recorded by Dominic Behan on the Collector record “Finnegan’s Wake”.

Book Reviews.

Vol. 5. no. 3. July 1960. What’s On and Who’s Singing.

A Singer’s Notebook; by Peter Kennedy.

I Wish I Was Back in Liverpool; words by Stan Kelly, music by Leon Rosselson.

Record Reviews.

TB or not TB; words by A.J. Davis, A.G. and M. Armstrong, tune : “Lolly Too Dum”.

Article : Broadside on Merseyside; by Eric Winter.

The Cat Came Back; words compiled by Ethel Raim, original words and music by Harry S. Miller (c.1890). Reprinted from Sing Out

The Body in the Bag; words and music (with some additions by Eric Winter) reprinted from Singabout.

The White Buck of Epping; words and music by Sydney Carter.

Article : The “Ho” Songs are Out : the songs and folksongs of Israel; by Leon Rosselson.

Article : Israeli Songs on Record.

Record Reviews.

To the Red Rock; words by Chaim Cheffer, music by Jochanan Zaria.

The Evening of Roses; words by Moshe Dor, music by Joseph Hadar.

Johnny Bigger; taken down from the singing of Cecil Pickett of Finstock, Oxfordshire, by John Hasted.

London City’s Getting Cleaner; words by Fred Dallas, tune : “The Finest Blooming Family in the Land”.

Book Reviews.

The Conscript’s Farewell; words and music by Fred Dallas. Reprinted from Sing Vol. 1, No. 5.

Article : Aldermaston, 1960.

Editorial : “Unite and Unite”.

Record Review.

The Sing Award 1958.

Vol. 5. no. 4. August 1961. St. Pancras Day; words by Alex Comfort, tune : “Courtin’ in the Kitchen”.

No Place to Hide; words by Fred Dallas, tune : “Sinner Man”.

Article : Seeger on Trial.

John Riley.

The Flag of the Earth; words and music by Sydney Carter.

Article : Why I am Opening a New Club; Ewan MacColl.

Article : The Ratcatcher’s Daughter; by Leslie Shepard.

The Ratcatcher’s Daughter; as sung by the London Youth Choir and arranged by Wendy Edwards.

The Easter Marchers; words by John Brunner, tune “The Foggy Dew” Irish version.

The Foggy Dew; Irish traditional. Reprinted from Sing Vol. 1, No. 4.

Article : Folkways on Record; by Robert Shelton.

Article : Fieldwork for Folkways; by Samuel B. Charters.

The Sailor and His True Love; a version recorded by Peter Kennedy from Eric Button.

Record Reviews.

Twelve Gates to the City; an old spiritual from the Thames-side Four’s record “Six Out of Four”.

Record Reviews.

Maids When You’re Young Never Wed an Old Man; as sung by Sam Larner.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by Stan Kelly.

The Sing Award 1959 and 1960.

Henry Martin; from the singing of Sam Larner.

Book Reviews.

Vol. 6. no. 1. Sept 1961. Article : Error of Judgement : Llangollen Adjudicators Were Wrong; by Henry Morris.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by Eric Winter.

Jomo Kenyatta; words by Johnny Ambrose, tune adapted from “Poor Lazarus”. Reprinted from Sing Vol. 1, No. 1. [To celebrate release of Jomo Kenyatta].

Article : Horsham Folk Festival.

Record Reviews.

The Crow on the Cradle; Sydney Carter.

The Misguided Missile and the Misguided Miss.

Book Reviews.

Buffalo Skinners; Woody Guthrie’s version of a classic cowboy ballad.

Article : For the Record; Ken Phine.

Vol. 6. no. 2. Oct 1961. The German Plan; words by John Brunner, tune ; “The Derby Ram”.

Record Reviews.

Sunday Morning; words and music by Fred and Betty Dallas.

Book Reviews.

The Highland Division’s Farewell to Sicily; words by Hamish Henderson, tune : “Farewell to the Creeks”.

The Teapot Song; words by Alex Comfort, music by Eric Winter.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by Robin Stubbs.

Article : For the Record; Ken Phine.

Vol. 6. no. 3. Nov 1961. Article : Seeger is Here; by Fred Dallas.

Article : New Clubs are Springing Up.

The Champion of the Seas; tune and original song “Sovereign of the Seas” collected by Jacqueline Macdonald from a retired sea-captain’s widow in South Shields. Words adapted and new words by Hugh Jones.

Article : Political Songs Will Never be Top Pops; Sydney Carter.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by Jack Parkinson.

Ballad of Pete Seeger; words by Colin Wilkie, tune : “Rare Turpin Hero”.

Record Reviews.

D’ye Ken Pressed Steel.

Article : For the Record; by Ken Phine.

Book Reviews.

Le Deserteur; song by Boris Vian, English words by John Brunner.

Vol. 6. no. 4. Dec 1961. Every Star Shall Sing a Carol : a Carol for the Space Age; words and music by Sydney Carter.

The Praties; Irish “potato famine” song dates to 19th century immigration to U.S.

Article : The Club Scene : Rumour Has It.

Away With Rum; reprinted from Sing Out, extra verses by Eric Winter and Henry Morris.

Book Reviews.

Article : The Notebooks of Niles; by Leslie Shepard.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : Unaccompanied Singers; by Eric Winter.

Ballad of the Sitdown; words by Alex Comfort. Tune : “The Bould Thady Quill.”

Ballad of the Removal of Stalin; words by Tony Rose. Tune first and last verses “Poor Old Jo”

treat the middle verses as a talking blues.

Worksong; words Fred Dallas. Tune : “Work Song” as sung by Harry Belafonte.

Record Reviews.

Vol. 6. no. 5. Jan 1962. Dividing Lines; a song for the New Year by Fred Dallas.

Record Reviews.

Ballad of Samuel Mabrey; words by Bill McAdoo. Tune : “Nancy Whiskey”.

Club News.

Sit, Brother, Sit; words by Alex Comfort. Tune : “Drink, Puppy, Drink”.

The Ascent of Everest; by Leslie Haworth.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : Dovetailing into the Tradition on Tyneside; by Anthea Joseph.

Farewell to the Monty; words by Johnny Handle. Tune by Lou Killen.

Record Reviews.

Vol. 6. no. 6. Feb 1962. Article : Yugoslav Folk Artists in Britain : Contrasting Styles; from Henry Morris.

Record Reviews.

The Rambling Royal; collected by A.L. Lloyd from Frank Jeffries, seaman of Liverpool.

Letters to the Editor.

Article : The Club Scene.

The Barras; words by Jim MacLean. Tune : “Maggie May.”

The Barrer Boy’s Lament; words by Mollie Armstrong. Tune : “Rakes ‘o Mallow.”

Tony ; words by Eric Winter. Tune : “My Bonny Lies Over the Ocean.”

When the Bomb Went Off : Dedicated to the Heroes of the Bomb Disposal Squads; words and music by Fed Dallas.

Record Reviews.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : Schlamme and Seeger : Two Shocks from America in 1961; by Sydney Carter.

Record Reviews.

Vol. 6. no. 7. March 1962. Article : Participation, not Performance : Henry Morris Leads August Folk School; from Sing reporters.

Record Reviews.

Naked Among Wolves; words by Fred Dallas. Music based by Fred Dallas on the American union song, Harry Sims.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : The Singer is the Ambassador of the Song; by Joy Hyman.

Kimmerid’s Garden; collected by Joy Hyman from Clifford Yeldham of Thaxted in Essex.

Article : Chappell and Kidson; by Eric Winter.

Talking St. Hildas.

Record Reviews.

Three Jolly Boys; as sung by the Liverpool Spinners.

Book Reviews.

Article : The Club Scene ; Bunyan in C&W at Acton; by Eric Winter.

Article : Folk Clubs Get-Together : “Sing” weekend in March.

Vol. 6. no. 8. April 1962. Article : Clubs Sing at Tring : Pendley Weekend was Rewarding and Instructive; from Sing Reporters.

Record Reviews.

I’m a Rover; Scottish Traditional.

Article : The Club Scene

Article : Voices of the Past : “The London Singer’s Magazine”; by Leslie Shepard.

Article : Voices of the Present : “Songs of the Sixties”; by A. L. Lloyd.

Ballad of the Future. Words by : Gutta Percha. Tune : Waltzing Matilda.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : Forest Folk at Southampton; by John Mann.

Record Reviews.

Friday Morning : the Thief and the Carpenter; a song for Easter by Sydney Carter.

Dona Dona; Composed for the Yiddish Musical Theatre. Words by Aaron Zeitlin. Music by Sholom Secunda.

Vol. 6. no. 9. May 1962. Article : Now Over 80 Clubs.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : Catching Fire in Dunfermline; by John Watt.

My Pittenweem Jo; Words and music by John Watt.

TheFreedom Come-All-Ye; Words by Hamish Henderson. Tune : The Bloody Fields o’ Flanders.

Article : Oh Wasna He a Piper : a Brief Note on James Robertson; by Hamish Henderson.

Record Reviews.

Article : Aldermaston : Glesca Eskimos.

The Suicide Arms; Words ; Anonymous. Tune : Oh Dear, What Can the Matter Be.

Article : The Club Scene : Clydeside’s New Club.

Old Aunt Kate; American Folk.

Hayraking; Collected by Joy Hyman from Wintry Adams of Hastings.

Vol. 6. no. 10. June 1962. Article : Seeger Wins “Contempt” Appeal.

The Leaving of Liverpool. Collected by W.M. Doerflinger from an ex-seaman Dick Maitland.

Book Reviews.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : The Aldermaston Nurse is Abroad; by Fed and Betty Dallas.

The Hamburg Floods; Words by Fred Dallas. Tune “Buffalo Skinners.”

Article : Joy and Jennifer in Israel.

The Big Casino; Words by David Callister and John Kaneen. Tune “Everything to God is Prayer.”

Article : A Fourth Folk Festival; by Douglas Kennedy.

Space Shanty; Words by Stan Kelly. Tune “Whip Jamboree.”

Article : The Club Scene : Surbiton’s Anniversary; by Giant Hennessey.

The Chastity Belt; Words “a combined universities affair”. Tune “is from Oxford.”

Record Reviews

Come With Us : German Anti-Bomb Song; English version by Fred and Betty Dallas.

Vol. 6. no. 11. July 1962. Article : A Folk Singer’s Paris; Alex Campbell reports.

The Boss of the Big Bag Store; collected by Pat Shaw, from Bruce Laurenson, Braesay, Shetland Islands.

Article : Spin Gets a Facelift.

Article : Songs of Spanish Resistance; by A.L. Lloyd.

Article : Morris at Thaxted

Summertime is Over; Translated by A.L. Lloyd. Comp[osed 1959. Author unknown.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook :Tradition With a Punch; by John Dunkerley.

Bogey’s Bonnie Belle. Taken from the Folkways Record Bothy Ballads, as sung by Ewan MacColl.

When I First Came to This Pad. Words by jack Parkinson. Tune “When First I Came to This Land.”

Article : Grand Schlamme; John Makepeace.

Article : The Club Scene ; Barndance With Clubsong.

Article : Carolyn is back in Town.

Records Review.

Book Review.

Vol. 6. no. 12. August 1962. Article : McPeakes Triumph; From Sing Reporters.

The Braes o’ Balquither. Betsy Miller’s version as sung on the Folklyric disc “A Garland of Scots Folksongs.”

Up Above; Words by David Ridge. Tune “Down Below.”

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : Finding’s Stealing; Ken Lindsay.

Article : The Club Scene : The Summer Survivors

Article ; Sing Goes to a Barndance

Johnny Todd : a Theme With Variations. Words by Frank Duffy.

Article : The Clancys and Carolyn for Edinburgh.

The Road to Dundee. Noted by Ewan MacColl from the singing of Rob Donald of Gardenstown.

The Workers’ Friend; words by Alex Comfort. Tune “When This Ruddy War is Over.”

Article : One Man’s Meat; by Rory McEwan.

Mrs McGrath. Words by Alex Campbell. Tune traditional.

Book Reviews.

Record Reviews.

Vol. 7. no. 1. Sept 1962. Article : Sing Goes to the Edinburgh Festival.

Article : John Makepeace Celebrates Christmas in August.

Boomerang gnaremooB; put together workshop fashion by the Glesca Eskimos.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; Mike Aston talks about the Folklander’s Austrian tour.

The Indian Lass; printed on a broadsheet, this song is sung by Lisa Turner and A.L. Lloyd on the Riverside Album “English Street Songs”.

Article : Flying Visit; Tony Davis and Mick Groves visit Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger.

She’s Like the Swallow; collected in Newfoundland.

Article : The Singing Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem; by Liam Clancy. Reprinted from Sing Out.

Wigan; words by Peter King, tune “The Mountains of Mourne”.

Record Reviews.

Article : The Club Scene : Saturday and Sunday Singers.

Vol. 7. no. 2. Oct 1962. If it Wisnae For the Union; words and music by Matt McGinn.

Article : the Folk Revival Isn’t New to Mrs Furbur; by Gail Hodgson.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : Singing in the Scillies; by Derek Sarjeant.

Bloody Orkneys; usually chanted, tune for this version by Jack Parkinson.

Article – Postscript from Edinburgh; by Terry Cobb.

Wor Geordie’s Lost His Penker; sung by Bob Davenport, Louis Killen, the Elliotts, and Geordies everywhere, tune : “Stand and Face Your Lover”.

The Giant Panda; words by Alex Comfort, tune : “Aurelia”.

Article : The Plucked Dulcimer; by Leslie Shepard.

The Beatnik Wedding; words by Gutta Percha, tune “The Streets of Laredo”.

Article ; Blues Stories from Storyville; by Eric Winter.

Record Reviews. Including “Ding Dong Dollar” (Folkways FDS444).

Vol. 7. no. 3. Nov/Dec 1962. Article : Enoch, Joy and Jennifer Debuts; by Eric Winter.

Article : Hark the Herald Angels Sing : A Christmas Story from Hungary; by Mor Jokai, illustrated by Romany Eveleigh.

Article : Blues at Manchester : Seek and Ye Shall Find; by Terry Cobb.

Record Reviews.

Dear John Profumo … ; words and music by Leon Rosselson. From the Topic EP “Songs for City Squares”.

New Tidings : A Carol for Chrsitmas; by Tony McCarthy, tune “God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen”.

Geordie; Martin carthy’s version of a traditional English song.

Record Reviews.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : The Singers and the Others; by Marlene Fielder.

Vol. 7. no. 4. Jan/Feb 1963. Article : Tees-Tyne Tops and Trads.

Article : Champion at Keeping ‘em Rolling.

Article : The Carters of Rye Cove; by Ed Badeaux. Reprinted from Sing Out.

A Sailor Coming Home on Leave; collected by Derek Sarjeant in a Chatham pub.

Article : All My Eye … the folk scene observed by Betty Martin.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : Too Much Imitation American; by Lydia Fish.

Henry My Son; Red Nerk’s late traditional “Lord Randall.”

Record Reviews.

Standing for Rotherham; words by Stan Crowther of the Rotherham Taverners.

My father Was a Cupid; words by Sydney Carter; tune : “Yankee Doodle”; accent : London.

Article : Where Alex Resides : the Club Scene reported by Sing correspondents.

Vol. 7. no. 5. June 1963. Record Reviews.

The Sun is Burning; words and music by Ian Campbell. Recorded on Topic TOP102.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : They Don’t All Emigrate; by Stan Crowther.

Record Reviews.

A Little Bomb Like You; words and music by Sydney Carter.

Top Robin; words by John Brunner, tune “Cock Robin”.

The Great Man; Mike Worrall celebrates a visitor to Tyneside, tune : “Cushie Butterfield”. [Lord Hailsham]

Vol. 7. no. 6. Sept 1963. Article : Late-night Folk for Edinburgh.

Article : Broadsheet Magazine for Scotland.

The Banks of OBD; the McPeake’s version of a traditional song.

The Banks of the Ohio; an American version of the song.

Article : Folk “Prom” in September; by Betty Martin.

Record Reviews.

The Rat Race; words and music by Sydney Carter.

Article : The McPeakes all Six of Them; by John Makepeace.

Keeping ‘em Rolling; words by Ewan MacColl, tune “Limerick Rake”.

Handsome Cabin Boy.

Article : Everlasting Fingernails; by Ron Fielder of the Fielders.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook; by Norman Bell of the Moonrakers.

Vol. 7. no. 7. Oct 1963. Article : Folk Gets a Lift on the Way.

Rocking the Baby; contributed by A.L. Lloyd and recorded by the Ian Campbell Folk Group. Australian folk song collected by John Meredith from Mrs. Sally Sloane of NSW.

John Anderson, My Jo; traditional, as sung by Isla Campbell.

Whaling in Greenland.

Marco Polo; words and music by Hugh Jones.

Article : What’s Happened to Jack Elliott; by Paul Nelson and Jon Pankake.

Record Reviews.

Ain’t it a Shame; words and music by Huddie Ledbetter.

The Fickle Young Man; a French song with English words by Shirley Hart; taken from the Fable record “Colin Wilkie and Shirley Hart Sing.”

Article : Turpin Hero : the work of John Foreman.

Vol. 8. no. 1. March-April 1964. Article : Pete Seeger Writes : America’s TV Blacklist.

The Banks of Newfoundland; traditional Irish. Collected by John Paddy Browne from Archie McKeegan of Glens of Antrim.

Record Reviews.

Hanging on a Tree; words and music by Vanessa Redgrave. Written for, and performed at an Anti-Apartheid rally December 1963.

Marilyn Munroe and Marilyn; words by Sydney Carter, music by Rory McEwen.

Ballad of Marilyn Munroe; words and music by Sydney Carter.

The Flower of Life; words and music by Tom Vernon.

Article : Songbooks from Ireland.

The Glendalough Saint; traditional Irish from Wicklow. Reprinted from The Second Book of Irish Ballads.

Article : Directory : Here are the Folk Clubs.

Article : Directory : Here are the Folk Magazines.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : A Federation of Clubs? By Mike Aston of the Folklanders.

Article : With my Ear to the Ground ; Broadside at the Black Horse; by John Brunner.

Article : The Latins from London : a Note About Dorita y Pepe.

Drinkin’s Ower Risky; words by Alex Campbell, tune : “Ricky Too-Dum-Dah”.

Article : All my Eye … the Folk Scene Observed; by Betty Martin.

Vol. 8. no. 2. January 1965. Editorial : Brirtan’s Biggest ’65 Folk Festival Will be at Keele.

Rivonia; words by and traditional Spanish tune arranged by Hamish Henderson.

I’m Goin’ to Knock; words and music by Alex Comfort.

Article : Participation – That’s What Impressed Me Most. Pete Seeger on the All-Irish Music Festival.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : Riding the Tiger; by Tom Wilson.

The Time of the Tiger; words and music by Len Chandler.

Record Reviews.

How Should I Your true Love Know? Words by William Shakespeare, tune : traditional.

A Sea Dirge; words by William Shakespeare, tune and guitar arrangement by Hylda Sims.

Battle Hymn of the New Socialist Party; words by Leon Rosselson, tune : “The Red Flag”.

I’m a Voter; words by Alan Twelve trees, tune “I’m a Rover” or “Clementine”.

Last Word; from an idea by Gutta Percha, tune “Chastity Belt”.

[Above 3 songs are parodies, for the October 1964 General Election].

Come Away, Melinda; words by Fred Hellerman, music by Fran Minkoff.

Article : Old Wine in a New Bottle : a Round-up of Topic’s 1964 and 1965 Issue.

Article : Folk Medals for 1964.

Article : Federation – That’s What We Want : Folk Clubs Conference’s Emphatic Call.

The Cuckoo; a traditional song from the Ritchie Family.

Last Night We Had a Do; words by Stan Kelly, tune ; reconstructed by Stan Kelly from childhood memories.

Article : A Barney in the Studio; by John Brunner.

Record Reviews : The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan.

Drowned in Paper; words and music by Pete Seeger.

Article : Square Miles of Paper; by Betty Martin.

Vol. 8. no. 3. April 1965. The Outlandish Knight. Traditional, collected by John Paddy Browne.

Article ; All Artistry and Conviction : a Note About Hedy West ; by A.L. Lloyd.

Anger in the Land; words by Don West, music by Hedy West. Reprinted from Sing Out.

Article : Faith, Doubt and Folksong; by Sydney Carter.

Lord of the Dance; words by Sydney Carter, tune “Simple Gifts”.

The Devil Wore a Crucifix; words and music by Sydney Carter.

Record Reviews [7 pages].

Article ; A Singer’s Notebook : Tingluti Gets Eight TV Shows, by Marlene Fielder.

The Times They Are A’Changin’, words and music by Bob Dylan.

The Rovin’ Ploughboy. Collected by Hamish Henderson from John MacDonald of Pitgaveny, Elgin.

Die Winter is Vergangen. Traditional Dutch song as sung by Cobi Schreijer.

I Wish I Was a Silver Watch; words by Alex Comfort, tune from the Forde Collection.

Article : Cobi Comes to Britain.

I Owe You, words and music by Matt McGinn.

Article : Whatever Happened to the Tide Song; by Betty Martin.

Vol. 8. no. 4. July 1965. I Love a Lass. Tune and first version traditional. Second version, words by Colin Wilkie.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : You’ve Got to Have Roots, by Stephen Sedley.

Sunny South Africa. Contributed by Nadia Cattouse to whom the song was sent from South Africa.

Now That the Buffalo’s Gone; words and music by Buffy Sainte-Marie.

Mother England; words by Dominic Behan, tune : “Hot Asphalt”.

Rain in the Forest; words by Alex Comfort, tune “The Cruel Wars”.

No More War; words and music by Alex Campbell.

Hangover; words and music by Leon Rosselson.

Glorious Ale. As sung by Jim Phillips. Reprinted from Heritage Broadside.

Goodman, Schwerner and Chaney; words and music by Tom Paxton.

Article ; Not So Much … ; by Betty Martin.

Record Reviews.

Vol. 8. no. 5. Nov 1965. Article ; Joan Baez – Our Kind of Singer.

There But For Fortune; words and music by Phil Ochs.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook ; Meanwhile, Down in Plymouth; by Cyril Tawney.

History Lesson; words and music by Leon Rosselson.

For Johnny; words by John Pudney, tune and arrangement by Terry Gould.

Get Your Haircut! Words by Tony McCarthy, tune based on “The Wark o’ the Weavers” (verse) and “The Oyster” (chorus).

Geordie Black; words by Rowland Harrison, tune : traditional.

Article : Just at the Right Time ; Keele Folk Festival; by Eric Winter, Brian Shuel and Sarah Winter.

Roving Jack; traditional. As sung by Jaquie and Bridie on the Fontana LP “Hold Back the Dawn”.

My Lady’s a Wild Flying Dove; words and music by Tom Paxton.

Article : Sing Reports from the Edinburgh Festival ; Matt Scores on the Folk Fringe.

Record Reviews.

Article : Newport Reports; by Betty Martin.

Vol. 9. no. 3. Aug-Sept 1966. Article : Penny Pinching Didn’t Kill Keele

Article : When is a Festival Not a Festival: [Cambridge and Beaulieu Folk Festivals].

The Pick and the Malt Shovel; words and music by Roger Watson.

The Reluctant Gardener; words by Alan Twelftree, tune “In and English Country Garden”.

Fine Team You Are; words by Tony McCarthy, tune “The Holy Ground”.

Loch Lomond. Collected in the streets of Edinburgh by Lady John Scott. Matt McGinn first sang this version of the song.

Simple Seaman; words and tune based on an old nursery rhyme by Eric Winter.

Beau John; words and music by Tom Paxton.

I Could Have Been a Tailor; English words by Alex Comfort, tune “Da Bfaiginn Mo Roga”.

Record Reviews.

Vol. 10. no. 1. June 1967. Article ; Good Folk Guide.

Book Reviews.

The Professor and the Girl; words and music by Alasdair Clayre.

The Roving Gravedigger; words and music by Hedy West. Based on the song “Le Fossoyeur Itinerant by the Belgian singer/songwriter Julos Beaucarne.

The Money Crop; words and music by Malvina Reynolds.

Article : A Singer’s Notebook : Illusion and Reality; Ian Campbell reviews two new records made under the direction of Ewan MacColl.

My Old man; words by Stan Kelly, tune “Macaffery” or “Lord Franklin”.

Glass of Water; words and music by Sydney Carter.

Running From Home; words and music by Bert Jansch.

You’ll Be Proud of Me; words and music by David Campbell.

The Old Woman and Her Cat; words by Watt Nicol, music by Matt McGinn.

Charlie Is My Darling; a tribute to General DeGaulle by Bobby Campbell and Gordon McCulloch. Tune “Charlie Is My Darling”.

Gilliver – the Story of a Pit Pony; words by Roger Watson, music by Colin Cater.

Record Reviews.

Article : Sing Launches Britain’s First Broadsheet Magazine.

Vol. 10. no. 2. June 1968. [N.B. A note in this issue of Sing explains that this is the first issue since the vol. 10, no. 1 issue of June 1967]

Article : A Visitor’s Good Folk Guide; compiled by Jean Aitchison.

Article : How Folk Songs Get Around; by A.L. Lloyd.

Kalinka; words and music traditional Russian. English words by Eric Winter.

Red Wine; words and music by Colin Wilkie.

Les Bourgeois; words and music by Julos Beaucarne.

Pleasant and Delightful; traditional English.

Never, Never; words and music by Mikis Theodorakis. English words by Jean Aitchison.

Book Reviews.

Record Reviews.

Vol. 10. no. 3. Sept 1968. Number 59. Article : Good Folk Guide.

A Night-Visiting Song; words and music by Roger Watson.

William Pike Driving Home; words and music by Terry Gould.

The Cockerham Devil; words by Pruw Edwards, music by Roger Edwards.

If I Can Remember the Words; words and music by Frank Money.

Music While You grow; words and music by Eric Winter.

The Towersey Sewer Song; words by Brian Perrett, tune “The Ractcatcher’ Daughter”.

Book Reviews.

Article : The Broadsheet Kings. Includes words for “Loving Hannah”, “Twa Corbies”, “Young William”, an untitled broadside by Julos Beaucarne on the 1968 student summer of discontent in Paris, and “Reflections on the Closing of Our Doss House” (with music).

The Rules of the Game; words and music by Leon Rosselson.

Vol. 10. no. 4. March 1969. Number 60. A Moral Tale; words and music by Stuart Lawrence.

God Blessed America; words by Woody Guthrie, tune “This Land is Your Land”.

Liverpool Judies; traditional English.

Article : Folk Medals for 1968.

Hold Your Hand to Michael; words and music by Mary Francis.

Article : An Incomplete List of Folk Clubs.

Book Reviews.

Pillow Chat; a cautionary tale by Mike Absalom.

Vietnam : the Printers’ Ambulance; words and music by Rod Shearman.

The Hoily Rigs; a poem by Bob Roberts

A Wexford Carol.

The Wanderer.

The Bad Years; words and music by Vera Johnson.

Record Reviews.

Books From Sing.

The following list details to contents level the Folder listed as PSC/1/2/2/1 in the JBPSC Finding Aid.

Further contents level listings will be developed as posted over time

 

No.

Title

Author, Artists, etc.

Publisher

Pub. Date

Notes

1

British Labour Songs

 

W.M.A.

1942

Contains : Song of War / Rutland Boughton; England Arise! / Edward Carpenter; The Red Flag / Jim Connell, tune Maryland

2

Day of Freedom [Rosnie len Szeroko]

Sulej, Michal

W.M.A. Singers

n.d.

English version by Miles Tomalin. 4-part arrangement by Alan Bush

3

Partisan Song [and] Our Country

 

W.M.A.

n.d.

Partisan Song : original text by Alymov, melody by Aturov, Arranged. by A.V. Alexandrov.

Our Country : English text and arrangement by Will Sahnow, music by Daniel Pokrass, from the film “A Day in the Life of the Soviet Union”

4

We Serve (Co-operative Youth Song)

Potter, Edward H.

W.M.A.

1946

Arranged by Arnold Clayton [note re WMA on back]

5

Our Song

Bush, Nancy

W.M.A.

1948

Music by Alan Bush. “Specially Commissioned for the Opening of the Nottingham Co-operative Art Centre 1948” W.M.A. no. 6052. Also present a copy in different printing, heavily annotated for performance

6

Till Right is Done

Gilman, Charlotte Perkin

W.M.A.

1939

Words adapted by Will Sahnow. Music by Alan Bush

7

Austrian Workers’ Song

Head, Nancy

W.M.A.

n.d.

Music : Das Lied Der Arbeit

8

Make Your Meaning Clear

Swingler, Randall

W.M.A.

1939

Music by Alan Bush. W.M.A. Choral Publications series

9

American Workers’ Songs

 

W.M.A.

n.d.

We are the Guys : words and music by Maurice Sugar. The Preacher and the Slave : words by Joe Hill

10

Labour’s Marching Song

Farley, Helen

W.M.A.

n.d.

Music by Peter Baker. Also contains Song for Spanish Democracy (Alternative words to be sung to the tune Labour’s Marching Song), words by Thomas Hurley

11

May Day Song

Hurley, Arthur

W.M.A.

n.d.

[Damaged – advertisement for Pocket Song Book glued to back]

12

Stand fast Co-operators!

Corum, Alfred

W.M.A.

1939

W.M.A. Choral Publications series [List of Choral Publications series on back]

13

Workers’ Peace Song

 

W.M.A.

n.d.

Words : anon. Music adapted from a German Workers’ March

14

Our Hands are Young : a Unison Song for Children

Bush, Nancy

W.M.A.

n.d.

Music by Gwendoline Mullings. “Specially Commissioned by the St. Cuthberts Co-operative Association in Celebration of its 90th Anniversary [ New Music for Children and Youth listing on back]

15

The Great Red Army

Swingler, Randall

W.M.A.

1942

Music by Alan Bush. W.M.A. no. 5017

16

The Red Flag for Male Voice Choir

Connell, Jim

W.M.A.

n.d.

Tune : Maryland. Arranged by Alan Bush [W.M.A. Publications advertisement on back]

17

The Marseillaise

L’Isle, Rouget De

W.M.A.

1944

Cover - English version by Nancy Bush. Title  information – Newly Translated by Nancy Head. Arranged for two-part chorus by Peter Baker. W.M.A. no. 5030

18

Funeral March

Swingler, Randall

W.M.A.

n.d.

Tune : Russian (1905). Arranged by Peter Baker. W.M.A. no. 6071

19

Convoy

Leff, Vera

W.M.A.

1942

Music by Aubrey Bowman [List of Soviet Songs on back]

20

Ballad of Lenin

Hughes, Langston

W.M.A.

1941

Music by Geoffrey Corbett

21

Anything Goes in a Song

Parsons, Geoffrey

W.M.A.

n.d.

Music by Berkeley Fase

22

Two Slav Youth Songs

 

W.M.A.

1947

The Two Year Plan Song (Czechoslovakia) ; English text by Nancy Bush, music by J. Stanislav. Youth Railway Song (Yugoslavia) ; English text by John Manifold, music Anon., piano accompaniment by Alan Bush. [List of New Music for New Times series on back]

23

Chinese Guerilla Song

 

W.M.A.

1942

English text by Harry White, music by F. Szabo. Also has National Flag Song : Tai Chi-t’ao, translated by Tu T’ing-hsin, music by Tu Ting-hsin, arranged by Chao Yuan-jen, edited by China Campaign Committee

24

Two Ukrainian Folksongs for Women’s Voices

 

W.M.A.

n.d.

Why Doesn’t He Tell Her? : English text by Lew Stone, music by Zakharov, arranged by Will Sahnow. Our Village : English text and arrangement by Will Sahnow, music by Zacharoff

25

A Chinese Cradle Song

 

W.M.A.

1940

Words and music from the original Chinese, English text by Nancy Head, music arranged by J. T.

26

Swing Along : Song of the American People

 

W.M.A.

n.d.

Music arranged by J. T.

27

The Red Flag for Unison or Mixed Choir

Connell, Jim

W.M.A

n.d.

Tune ; Maryland. Arranged by Alan Bush. W.M.A. no. 6048

28

Himno De Riego : Spanish Republican Anthem

 

W.M.A.

n.d.

National Anthem of the Spanish Republic, arranged by J. T., translated by Nancy Head

29

20 Songs

 

W.M.A.

n.d.

All selected by A. L. Lloyd, arranged by Alan Bush. The Lark in the Morning. Brigg Fair. The Lincolnshire Poacher. The Hiring Fair. The Careful Carter. A Seaman’s Life. High Barbary. Blow Ye Winds. Lowlands, My Lowlands, Away. Hanging Johnny. Hares on the Mountain. I Will Give My Love an Apple. The Little Turtle Dove. The Water is Wide. Blackbirds and Thrushes. Tarrier’s Song. The Collier’s Rant. The Sperm Whale Fishery. Billy Boy. Ilkley Moor. W.M.A. no. A/29

30

Popular Soviet Songs

 

W.M.A.

1941

Soviet Airmen’s Song : words adapted by Randall Swingler, tune arranged by G. M. S. and J. T. The Land of Freedom : I. Dunajevski. Red Cavalry : words by A. Surkov, translated by Ben Blake, music by Daniel and Dimitri Pokrass. Salute to Life : English translation by Nancy Head, music by D. Shostakovitch. Cavalry of the Steppes : Russian text by Guser, English version by Nancy Head, music by L. Knipper. Young Comrade’s Song (from Jazz Comedy) : music by Dunayevsky. The Doubinushka (Worker’s Song from Czarist Russia : words by Randall Swingler, arranged by Hanns Eisler

31

Red Army Songs : To Our Soviet Allies

 

W.M.A.

1942

Moscow : English text by Will Sahnow, music by Dimitri and Daniel Pokrass. Volga Song : English text by P. Breslin, music by A.V. Alexandrov. If Tomorrow Brings War : English version by A. Steiger, revised by Will Sahnow, music by Dimitri and Daniel Pokrass. Partisan Song : original text by Alymov, melody by Aturov. Arranged by A.V. Alexandrov. Our Country (from the film “ A Day in the Life of the U.S.S.R.”) : English text and arrangement by Will Sahnow, music by Daniel Pokrass. Death of Chapayev ; English text  by Ben Blake, music by V. Sedoy. The Silver Birch : English text by Will Sahnow, arranged by A.V. Alexandrov. From Border to Border : English text by John Alford and Will Sahnow, music by I. Dzerzhinsky. The International : words from the French of E. Pottier, arranged by Alan Bush.

32

The Wild Geese : Soviet Opera for Children

 

W.M.A.

1942

English text John Alford, music Julia Weisberg

33

Greek Freedom Song

Theodorakis. Mikis

W.M.A.

1967

English text by Nancy Bush, guitar cords by Alan Bush

34

When the Red Army Marches

Parsons, Geoffrey

W.M.A.

1941

Music by Berkeley Fase. [List of Soviet Songs on back]

35

For Freedom

Parsons, Geoffrey

W.M.A.

1941

Music by Berkeley Fase. [List of Soviet Songs on back]

36

Song of Stalin

Khatchatourian, Aram

W.M.A.

1941

Choral movement from the tone poem “Stalin” (1938). Original text by Ashuha Mirza of Tauz, English text by John Alford and Will Sahnow . [List of Soviet Songs on back]

37

East-West Rhythm

Percival, Michael

W.M.A.

1942

Arranged by Arnold Clayton

38

The Ribbon in Her Hair

O’Casey, Sean

W.M.A.

1936

Music by Elizabeth Maconchy. Also includes Here We Come : words by Roger Wooddis, music by John Berry

39

Lenin in Siberia

 

W.M.A.

1970

Original poem by U. Kamenetz, English version by Nancy Bush, music by Vano Muradeli, arranged by Alan Bush

40

London’s May Day Song

 

W.M.A.

1954

Text by Stewart Farra, music by John Horrocks, arranged by Will Sahnow

41

The Internationale

Pottier, E.

W.M.A.

n.d.

Music by Degeyter, arranged by Alan Bush for chorus [List of choral publications on back]

42

Shining Vision : a Song for Peace

 

W.M.A.

1950

Text by Montagu Slater, music by Alan Bush. W.M.A. no. 6068

43

There’s a Reason

Swingler, Randall

W.M.A.

n.d.

Music by Alan Bush

44

Truth on the March

Swingler, Randall

W.M.A.

n.d.

Adapted by Alan Bush, music by Alan Bush

45

The Challenge Song

Claydon, Stella

W.M.A.

1952

Music by John Miller. “Topic Songbook Words and melodies of Old Favourites : Festival Special”

46

A New World Will be Born

Parsons, Geoffrey

W.M.A.

1941

Music by Berkeley Fase