Global Security MRes

Army Humvee silhouette

The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges.

Key facts

Why this programme

  • You will study research methods within the College of Social Sciences’ Graduate School which is one of the top research training centres in the UK and benefits from ESRC recognition for many of its courses.
  • You will have the opportunity to undertake a study visit to Brussels which offers the chance to experience security and political institutions like NATO and the European Commission and meet key security personnel.
  • You will combine your research methods training with a range of security focused optional courses from a broad spectrum of subject areas, including politics, sociology, Central & East European studies, war studies, computing science, geography, law, business and education.
  • The programme includes a series of master classes from high profile professionals and academics working in the field of security. 
  • You will have the opportunity to take part in special formative learning workshops and training days - working with government officials and policy-makers to simulate the process of responding to major international security crises.

Programme structure

Core courses

  • International security and global politics
  • Thematic issues in global security
  • Qualitative research methods 
  • Social sciences statistics
  • Introduction to social theory for researchers
  • Dissertation.

Sample optional courses

  • Critical perspectives on securities and vulnerabilities
  • Comparative approaches to warfare and violent conflict
  • Freedom, security and justice in the European Union
  • Globalisation and european integration
  • Globalisation and the new security agenda in central and eastern europe
  • Society, environment and the concept of sustainable development in post Soviet Russia
  • Post-Soviet Russia: renegotiating global and local iIdentities
  • The European Union in international politics and development
  • International relations theory
  • The Internet and civil society
  • Human rights and global politics
  • Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
  • British military power since 1945
  • The American way of war: from the revolution to the war on terror
  • Social change and social justice: activism, social movements and democracy
  • Development, postcolonialism and environment
  • The global criminal economy
  • Ethics in global politics

What our students say

Darren Reid, UK (2012-13)

'I chose the University of Glasgow because of its international reputation, both as an institution and more specifically within the field of social science.

Having completed my undergraduate in politics, I chose the Global Security programme because it would allow me to build on knowledge I had already acquired, whilst also introducing me to new concepts and issues that I hadn’t previously encountered. I found the wide range of optional courses available on the programme appealing, as it accommodated for my broad array of interests within the field; for example, I was able to take a course on criminological perspectives on security, which fed my interest in criminology, whilst still placing it within the context of security. The core courses of the programme were challenging, yet interesting and enjoyable; being delivered in an informal tutorial format really fostered in depth discussion, and ultimately greater understanding of issues that were at first opaque.

read more...

The reason I chose the MRes programme over the MSc was that I was interested in possibly pursuing a PhD in the future, and I knew that the quantitative and qualitative training I would receive would be extremely beneficial. I wouldn’t however, only recommend the MRes programme to those with aspirations of pursing a PhD, the research modules provide training that is often sought after by potential employers – for example, I now have experience using the statistics programme SPSS.

The master classes have become one of the highlights of the programme. They cover a vast range of security issues, which are often not covered within an academic context – for example, this semester one of the guest speakers provided us with an introduction to ‘Process Security’ focusing on his experiences in the energy sector. These classes also allow students to meet and network with prospective employers, as well as the opportunity to hear views on issues delivered from those directly involved.

Given that the Global Security programme attracts people from a myriad of different academic disciplines – I have classmates from geography, computer science, and criminology backgrounds – everyone has their own research interests. The programme staff realise this and are keen to encourage and develop individual research interests, which only motivates you to apply yourself to your studies and develop your own ideas – essential when faced with a postgraduate workload.

I would strongly recommend the Global Security programme to anyone interested in examining the threats we face in the contemporary world. This isn’t a programme only suited to those from political or international relations backgrounds, it will accommodate for those from numerous disciplines and I encourage people from any discipline to consider applying to this young and exciting programme.'

Entry requirements

for entry in 2015

Entry requirements for postgraduate taught programmes are a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification (for example, GPA 3.0 or above) in a relevant subject.

English language requirements

For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level.

International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training)

  • overall score 6.5
  • no sub-test less than 6.0
  • or equivalent scores in another recognised qualification (see below)

Common equivalent English language qualifications

All stated English tests are acceptable for admission for both home/EU and international students for this programme:

  • ibTOEFL: 92; no sub-test less than 20
  • CAE (Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English): 176 overall; no sub-test less than 169
  • CPE (Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English):  176 overall; no sub-test less than 169
  • PTE Academic (Person Test of English, Academic test): 60; no sub-test less than 59

For international students, the Home Office has confirmed that the University can choose to use these tests to make its own assessment of English language ability for visa applications to degree level programmes. The University is also able to accept an IELTS test (Academic module) from any of the 1000 IELTS test centres from around the world and we do not require a specific UKVI IELTS test for degree level programmes. We therefore still accept any of the English tests listed for admission to this programme.

Pre-sessional courses

The University of Glasgow accepts evidence of the required language level from the Language Centre Pre-sessional courses. We also consider other BALEAP accredited pre-sessional courses:

FAQs

What do I do if...

my language qualifications are below the requirements?

The University's Language Centre offers a range of Pre-Sessional Courses to bring you up to entry level. The course is accredited by BALEAP, the UK professional association for academic English teaching; see Links.

my language qualifications are not listed here?

Please contact the Recruitment and International Office: pgadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk

 

For further information about English language requirements, please contact the Recruitment and International Office: pgadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk

Fees and funding

Tuition fees for 2015-16 (subject to change and for guidance only)

MRes

Home and EU
Full time fee£6800
Part time 20 credits£756
International
Full time fee£14500

Funding opportunities

Career prospects

The programme provides a dedicated research training pathway if you are to looking to go onto doctoral study or to seek a career within a social research field.

How to apply

We ask that you apply online for a postgraduate taught degree. Our system allows you to fill out the standard application form online and submit this to the University within 42 days of starting your application.

You need to read the guide to applying online before starting your application. It will ensure you are ready to proceed, as well as answer many common questions about the process.

Guide to applying online

Do I have to apply online for a postgraduate taught degree?

Yes. To apply for a postgraduate taught degree you must apply online. We are unable to accept your application by any other means than online.

Do I need to complete and submit the application in a single session?

No. You have 42 days to submit your application once you begin the process. You may save and return to your application as many times as you wish to update information, complete sections or upload additional documents such as your final transcript or your language test.

What documents do I need to provide to make an application?

As well as completing your online application fully, it is essential that you submit the following documents:

  • A copy (or copies) of your official degree certificate(s) (if you have already completed your degree)
  • A copy (or copies) of your official academic transcript(s), showing full details of subjects studied and grades/marks obtained
  • Official English translations of the certificate(s) and transcript(s)
  • Two supporting reference letters on headed paper
  • Evidence of your English Language ability (if your first language is not English)
  • Any additional documents required for this programme (see Entry requirements for this programme)
  • A copy of the photo page of your passport (Non-EU students only)

If you do not have all of these documents at the time of submitting your application then it is still possible to make an application and provide any further documents at a later date, as long as you include a full current transcript (and an English translation if required) with your application. See the ‘Your References, Transcripts and English Qualification’ sections of our Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

Do my supporting documents need to be submitted online?

Yes, where possible, please upload the supporting documents with your application.

How do I provide my references?

You must either upload the required references to your online application or ask your referees to send the references to the University as we do not contact referees directly. There is two main ways that you can provide references: you can either upload references on headed paper when you are making an application using the Online Application (or through Applicant Self-Service after you have submitted your application) or you can ask your referee to email the reference directly to pgadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk. See the 'Your References, Transcripts and English Qualifications' section of the Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

What if I am unable to submit all of my supporting documents online?

If you cannot upload an electronic copy of a document and need to send it in by post, please attach a cover sheet to it that includes your name, the programme you are applying for, and your application reference number.

You may send them to:

Recruitment & International Office
71 Southpark Avenue
Glasgow
G12 8QQ
Fax: +44 141 330 4045

Can I email my supporting documents?

No. We cannot accept email submissions of your supporting documents.

What entry requirements should I have met before applying? Where can I find them?

You should check that you have met (or are likely to have met prior to the start of the programme) the individual entry requirements for the degree programme you are applying for. This information can be found on the ‘entry requirements’ tab on each individual programme page, such as the one you are viewing now.

What English Language requirements should I have met before applying? Where can I find them?

If you are an international student, you should also check that you have met the English Language requirements specific to the programme you are applying for. These can also be found on the ‘entry requirements’ tab for each specific programme.

Further Information

Please see the Frequently Asked Questions for more information on applying to a postgraduate taught programme.

Guidance notes for using the online application

These notes are intended to help you complete the online application form accurately, they are also available within the help section of the online application form. If you experience any difficulties accessing the online application then you should visit the Application Troubleshooting/FAQs page.

  • Name and Date of birth: must appear exactly as they do on your passport. Please take time to check the spelling and lay-out.
  • Contact Details: Correspondence address. All contact relevant to your application will be sent to this address including the offer letter(s). If your address changes, please contact us as soon as possible.
  • Choice of course: Please select carefully the course you want to study. As your application will be sent to the admissions committee for each course you select it is important to consider at this stage why you are interested in the course and that it is reflected in your application.
  • Proposed date of entry: Please state your preferred start date including the month and the year. Taught masters degrees tend to begin in September. Research degrees may start in any month.
  • Education and Qualifications: Please complete this section as fully as possible indicating any relevant Higher Education qualifications starting with the most recent. Complete the name of the Institution (s) as it appears on the degree certificate or transcript.
  • English Language Proficiency: Please state the date of any English language test taken (or to be taken) and the award date (or expected award date if known).
  • Employment and Experience: Please complete this section as fully as possible with all employments relevant to your course. Additional details may be attached in your personal statement/proposal where appropriate.
  • References: Please provide the names and contact details of two academic references. Where applicable one of these references may be from your current employer. References should be completed on letter headed paper and uploaded on to your application.

Standard application deadlines

  • International applications (non-EU) 24 July 2015
  • UK and EU applications 28 August 2015
    (with the exception of those programmes offering SFC funded places)

Classes start September 2015 for most programmes and you may be expected to attend induction sessions the week before.

Apply now