The Mackintosh House

Pendant light fittings, c. 1900
Silver-plated brass with leaded glass

The simple cube and dome design contains a coloured glass leaf motif. The fixtures were originally made for the Mackintoshes' flat at 120 Mains Street, Glasgow, which was lit by gas. When the Mackintoshes brought them to their next home at Florentine Terrace, Glasgow, they were adapted for electricity.

The Mackintosh House

Door and writing cabinet (detail)

This writing cabinet was made for Mackintosh's personal use. Mackintosh employed a range of different materials, including mahogany, ivory, pearwood and leaded glass. The overall design combines a sophisticated range of subtle tapering and geometric forms.

The Mackintosh House

Armchair for 'The Rose Boudoir'

In 1902 Mackintosh and his wife Margaret Macdonald took part in the International Exhibition of Modern and Decorative Art at Turin. Two examples of this chair were shown in a room setting of their work which they called 'The Rose Boudoir'. The theme of the rose inspired the overall colour scheme of white, silver and pink, and underlay the decorative detailing of many of the pieces.

The Mackintosh House

Studio Drawing Room

Two rooms were knocked through to create this beathtaking L-shaped interior, decorated throughout in white and flooded with light from a new horizontal window on the south wall. The furniture was a skillful mix of dark-stained items and white painted pieces.

The Mackintosh House

Bedroom

As in the studio-drawing room, two rooms were knocked through to create an L-shaped apartment, decorated in white, with new door, light-fittings and fireplace. The furniture, with its sculptural detailing inspired by plant and bird forms, was designed in 1900.

The Mackintosh House

Glass panel (detail)
Lead with clear and coloured glass

This panel was exhibited as part of the Mackintoshes' room setting, the 'Rose Boudoir'. The design, showing a stylised 'rose lady' in profile, looking to the right, is closely related to Mackintosh's graphic designs. Coloured glass was regularly incorporated into Mackintosh's furniture and interiors of the early 1900s as inset panels.

The Mackintosh House

Hall

In the hall Mackintosh aimed to disguise the awkward proportions of the existing small porch and high, narrow hall. The entrance was completely remodelled and the outer storm doors replaced by a single door. To provide more light, a larger horizontal window replaced the narrow upright one on the south wall.

The Mackintosh House

Dining Room

The decorative scheme in the dining room boldly subdivides the space between the white ceiling and frieze, and the sombre stencilled decoration. The dark-stained furniture dates from the late 1890s to 1900 and most striking are the chairs, Mackintosh's first 'high-back', based on a design for Miss Cranston's Tea Rooms, Argyle Street, Glasgow (1898-99).