Winning entry: Slow Light

Winning entry: Slow Light

Image: Emma Wisniewski-Barker

Light is slowed to the speed of an Olympic sprinter as it passes through a ruby. Bright and dark regions of an image are slowed by similar amounts, which requires storage of the optical energy. Understanding slow light is a step towards faster and more efficient all-optical computer processing.

Light is slowed to the speed of an Olympic sprinter as it passes through a ruby. Photo: Emma Wisniewski-Barker

2nd place: Calcite fibres of a Brachiopod shell

2nd place: Calcite fibres of a Brachiopod shell

Image: Prof Maggie Cusack

Crytallographic orientation map of the calcite fibres of the shell of the brachiopod, Terebratulina retusa. Fibres are 10 microns wide. Image generated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis. Colours indicate crystallographic orientation. Since each fibre has a single colour, this indicates that they are each single crystals.

Calcite fibres of a brachiopod shell. Photographer: Maggie Cusack

Joint 3rd: Digital terrain model

Joint 3rd: Digital terrain model

Image: Robin Seet

Deriving the coastal low-water line helps fix the maritime boundary of a nation and monitoring line movements allows detection of erosional or accretional changes to beach and nearshore seabed.Erosion and flood risk is determined by elevating the low-water line to predicted future sea levels.

Digital Terrain Model. Image: Robin Seet

Joint 3rd: Scientific bowknot

Joint 3rd: Scientific bowknot

Image: Nan Qi

Here shows an original microstructure photography of Ti-alloy by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) technique. Coincidentally, the alloy segregation forms a similarly bowknot shape, which is full of aesthetic feeling and impresses us upon the magic and fun of our scientific exploration field.

Original microstructure photography of Ti-alloy by Scanning Electron Microscope(SEM) technique. Photo: Nan Qi

Glowing reaction; green chemistry

Glowing reaction; green chemistry

Image: Dr Tim Drysdale

Engineers and chemists are collaborating to react solid-state materials in specialist high-power microwave systems whilst probing them with neutron beams.  Seen here from inside the system, the reactions are hot, bright and fast, and use only 1/10,000 of the energy of conventional furnaces.  Once scaled up, they promise new, sustainable, green chemical manufacturing processes for the UK’s most lucrative export sector.

Glowing reaction; green chemistry. Photo: Tim Drysdale

Hot patterns - natural Erskine tartan

Hot patterns - natural Erskine tartan

Image: Prof Paul Younger

Ultra-low carbon geothermal energy is produced by harmless, natural radioactive decay within potassium-rich minerals – such as the black and white ‘tartan’ crystals of microcline mixed in here with colourful olivine in this ‘norite’ rock from Lochinver, Sutherland: polarised-light microscopy helps us identify the very best geothermal heat source rocks. 

Hot patterns - natural Erskine tartan. Photo: Paul Younger

Photon by photon

Photon by photon

Image: Daniele Giovannini

A crystal used to produce twin photons. The properties of the photon pair are well-defined but those of each individual photon are not — until measured. Any correlations between the measurement outcomes persist even if the photons are separated by an arbitrarily large distance, a feature of the quantum world Einstein called "spooky action at a distance".

A crystal used to produce twin photons. Photo: Daniele Giovannini

Multi-wavelength imaging of the human retina using a filter array will allow improved determination of retinal blood vessel oxygenation

Multi-wavelength imaging of the human retina using a filter array will allow improved determination of retinal blood vessel oxygenation

Image: Dr Laurence Brewer

Coupling the image-replicating imaging spectrometer (IRIS), which took the eight images of the human retina at different wavelengths simultaneously, with the filter array shown will allow improved determination of retinal blood oxygenation. This may allow improved diagnosis of retinal diseases such as macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy.

Multi-wavelength imaging of the human retina using a filter array will allow improved determination of retinal blood vessel oxygenation. Photo: Laurence Brewer

Sensing National Grid Health to Assist Renewable Energy Source Integration

Sensing National Grid Health to Assist Renewable Energy Source Integration

Image: Sean Leavey

How can we all help stabilise a National Grid with higher proportions of intermittent wind turbines? By using our laptops! We've developed a smart sensor which knows when there is not enough electricity on the grid and switches off charging accordingly. This can help to allow more renewable energy sources to be used to power our lives.

Smart sensor to assist renewable energy source integration. Photo: Sean Leavey

Seeing atomic structures in 3D

Seeing atomic structures in 3D

Image: Dr Ian MacLaren

The structure of novel boundaries in bismuth ferrite doped with neodymium and titanium is revealed in unique three dimensional detail using atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope from multiple directions - even revealing the detail of the chemical identity of every atom in the boundary.

The structure of novel boundaries in bismuth ferrite doped with neodymium and titanium is revealed in unique three dimensional detail using atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy. Photo: Ian McLaren

Helping hands: building space hardware

Helping hands: building space hardware

Image: Mike Perreur-Lloyd

Gravitational wave observation will reveal the most violent events in the Universe with unprecedented clarity.  For spaceborne detectors, precision optical technologies - designed, built and tested at the University of Glasgow - are required to make measurements of a millionth of a millionth of a metre, over million kilometre distances.

Precision optical technologies - designed, built and tested at the University of Glasgow - are required to make measurements of a millionth of a millionth of a metre, over million kilometre distances. Photo: Mike Perreur-Lloyd

Supernatural philosophy

Supernatural philosophy

Image: Prof Ian Strachan

Equations, such as x3 + y3 + z3 + axyz + b(xy + yz + zx) + c = 0; come to life when visualized as surfaces, but even these are shadows, projections into our space, of more beautiful, higher-dimensional objects. The study of these objects enabled mathematical physicists to solve century old problems originating in pure mathematics. Research in Glasgow has studied their hidden symmetries which connect the very large with the very small.

Equations, such as x3 + y3 + z3 + axyz + b(xy + yz + zx) + c = 0 ; come to life when visualized as surfaces. Image: Ian Strachan

Onboard UAV shot

Onboard UAV shot

Image: Aldo Vargas

This photo was taken with a camera onboard a Unmanned Aerial Vehicle on its maiden outdoor flight, the UAV is semi-autonomous at this stage, and requires a pilot (myself) to adjust its position and attitude.

Onboard-UAV self-shot: West Quadrant of the main building of the University of Glasgow. Photo: Aldo Vargas.

Nano pillars: mid-infrared light at nano scale

Nano pillars: mid-infrared light at nano scale

Image: Philipe Velha

This array of sub-100 nm Germanium etch down more than 1 micron deep possess a form factor which is at the edge of the technology. Such pillars exhibit optical properties that differs from bulk material and allow efficient light generation from a material which usually doesn't emit.

Array of sub-100 nm Germanium. Photo: Philipe Velha

Suspended membrane for nano electrical and thermal characterisation

Suspended membrane for nano electrical and thermal characterisation

Image: Antonio Samarelli

The Scanning electron micrograph represents a suspended membrane structure developed at the University of Glasgow to investigate the electrical and thermal properties of Silicon nanowires. These devices show enhanced properties for efficient thermoelectric energy harvester, ultrafast electronics and single electron transistor, biosensing and defense.

Suspended membrane for nano electrical and thermal characterisation. Photo: Antonio Samarelli

The Hidden Power of Light

The Hidden Power of Light

Image: Neil Gordon

A long exposure time and photo-sensitive card are used to reveal the invisible details of a high-power infrared laser beam. The pictured components apply many intricate transformations to the light, before transferring it to an adjoining system where the laser power builds up to several thousand times its initial strength. Precise control of the entire system allows creation of an optical spring, whereby the light beam can be made to act stronger than diamond.

A long exposure time and photo-sensitive card are used to reveal the invisible details of a high-power infrared laser beam. Photo: Neil Gordon.

The Healing Sound

The Healing Sound

Image: Mohd Hafiz Ismail

A new nebulisation technique for targeted pulmonary drug delivery and gene therapy to specific sites in the body using surface acoustic waves on a lithium and silicon phononics structures were developed to generate and focus sound waves that can nebulise and control the droplet size of drugs, protein and DNA.

Nebulisation technique. Photo: Mohd Hafiz Ismail

3D printed miniaturised trapping arrays for the development of automated analysis of zebrafish embryos

3D printed miniaturised trapping arrays for the development of automated analysis of zebrafish embryos

Image: Niall MacDonald

Zebrafish (Danio rerio) analysis has since the 1970’s been a powerful model for human diseases, drug discovery and environmental toxicity. While the model provides accurate results the process required to investigate zebrafish embryos throughout their development is still a time-consuming task.

This work aims to automate the process in conjunction with optical assay techniques. In this photo we present the fabrication of such a device with a 3D printer and integration with a micro analysis platform (μAP).

3D printed miniaturised trapping arrays for the development of automated analysis of zebrafish embryos. Photo: Niall MacDonald.

The stress distribution on an iliac bifurcation

The stress distribution on an iliac bifurcation

Image: Hao Gao

The bifurcation structure is of particular biomechanical and clinical interest. This biaxial extension and inflation numerical experiment under in vivo conditions of human iliac bifurcation is implemented by a finite element analysis.

The more concentrating the stress endures indicates the more disease-prone this location will be (the bifurcation tip in this case).

The stress distribution on an iliac bifurcation. Photo: Hao Gao

Quality Assessment of 3D Electron Tomography

Quality Assessment of 3D Electron Tomography

Image: Ala'Al-Afeef

Our brain routinely understand reflected-light images but are ill-equipped to interpret Transmission-electron-microscope images, this is why new technique was invented (Electron-Tomography), which uses a sequence of 2D-images taken at different angels to create a 3D-image. This photograph shows a simulation of Electron-Tomography applied on object that is familiar to the human eyes to quality asses the accuracy of the reconstructed object.

Quality Assessment of 3D Electron Tomography (ET). Photographer: Ala'Al-Afeef

In pursuit of gravitational waves: precision interferometry in space

In pursuit of gravitational waves: precision interferometry in space

Image: Dr David Robertson

Gravitational wave observation will reveal the most violent events in the Universe with unprecedented clarity.  For spaceborne detectors, precision optical technologies - designed, built and tested at the University of Glasgow - are required to make measurements of a millionth of a millionth of a metre, over million kilometre distances.

In pursuit of gravitational waves: precision interferometry in space. Image: David Robertson

In pursuit of gravitational waves: precision sensing in space

In pursuit of gravitational waves: precision sensing in space

Image: Dr Christian Killow

Gravitational wave observation will reveal the most violent events in the Universe with unprecedented clarity.  For spaceborne detectors, precision optical technologies - designed, built and tested at the University of Glasgow - are required to make measurements of a millionth of a millionth of a metre, over million kilometre distances.

In pursuit of gravitational waves: precision sensing in space. Image: Christian Killow

Flying camera image: mosaic of Garscube Campus

Flying camera image: mosaic of Garscube Campus

Image: Dr Seamus Coveney

Miniature flying cameras aren’t just used by the military. They are placing aerial imaging in the hands of all scientists. Research at UoG is developing cutting-edge methods that automatically recognise natural features and environmental events, making these tiny aircraft a valuable tool for the protection of our pristine Scottish environment.

Flying Camera image-mosaic of Garscube Campus. Photo: Seamus Coveney