Language, Literature and Culture

Language, Literature and Culture

Language, Literature and Culture KE Case Studies

Language, Literature and Culture KE Case Studies

Ownership of Scots Dialects

Professor Jennifer Smith is a sociolinguist who studies the interface between the social and the linguistic in language use, because our speech gives away a lot of clues to our identity. Smith investigated the use of Scots by recording people, including pre-school children, across a variety of Scottish communities. She discovered that Scots-speaking children are bi-dialectical, and that Scots dialects have specific and complicated sets of rules, just like standard English. Her work aims to dispel the myth that people who speak Scots are less intelligent or can't speak English "properly" and to teach children that they are speaking Scots already. Smith believes that the study of Scots should be integrated into the classroom, as a starting point, by allowing the children to create their own resources by recording, transcribing and analysing Scots speech. Smith is collaborating with education planners and intends to trial this approach in a number of schools. 

Academic: Prof Jennifer Smith 

Partners: Education Scotland, Buckie High School

To find out more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership of your own with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development Manager by phone (0141 330 3885) or by email


Learning Polish is as Easy as 1+2

Dr Elwira Grossman and her research assistant Iza Rudzka worked in collaboration with Education Scotland and Glasgow University Arts Lab to develop a Polish as a foreign language unit to be taught in Scottish primary schools. There are currently 15,000 Polish speaking children in Scottish schools, and yet so far the curriculum has privileged Western European languages such as French, German and Spanish. Grossman has discovered that teaching Polish in the classroom gives children a more European and cosmopolitan outlook, and helps to raise the self-esteem of Polish speaking children. The language unit was designed to be the second foreign language children will be exposed to in primary five, as part of the Scottish Government's new '1+2' foreign language scheme. 

Academic: Dr Elwira Grossman

Partners: Education Scotland

To find out more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership of your own with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development Manager by phone (0141 330 3885) or by email.  


Translations at the Edinburgh Film Festival

Over the past 20 years, Margaret Tejerizo has collaborated with the Edinburgh International Festival (EIF) as a translator, cultural adviser and interpreter. The aim has been to “give voice” to many works over these years to national and international EIF audiences.
This has involved using Russian, Spanish, French and Romanian and resulted in productions with theatre directors and conductors such as Peter Stein, Calixto Bieito, and Valerii Gergiev, as well as collaborations with theatre and opera companies worldwide.
In addition to the creation and production of supertitles for many major EIF productions, original translations into English for EIF include “Faust”, (from Romanian), “The Invisible City of Kitezh” (from Russian), “December” (from Spanish) and many more.

Project Partner:
Edinburgh International Festival

Academic:
Dr Margaret Tejerizo


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Writing & Publishing: FÈIS LITREACHAIS – A Gaelic Literature Festival in collaboration with the Gaelic Books Council

On the 8th of October 2014, Fiona Dunn (Gaelic Language Officer) is running a Gaelic Literature Festival 2pm - 7pm, Gilchrist Postgraduate Club. The event is being run in collaboration with the Gaelic Book Council with several professionals from the publishing industry involved as participants. The Gaelic Book Council works alongside a variety of publishing companies to develop Gaelic literature and support writers.

The festival will provide students (complete beginners, learners & fluent speakers) with an insight into the world of Gaelic literature via a series of talks and workshops delivered by professional writers, broadcasters and academics. The aim is to advise students on how best to develop their own knowledge of and skills in Gaelic writing and reading, and to enhance their knowledge of the Gaelic publishing industry. At the same time, industry partners gain an awareness of forthcoming talent and prospective graduate employees, whilst having the opportunity to promote their organisation and new products to the students (who are very much an important audience).

To attend you must register by emailing, Fiona.Dunn@glasgow.ac.uk by Monday 6th October

 

Project Partner:
Gaelic Book Council

Academic:
Fiona Dunn


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Locating Burns in Scottish and Global Culture

Academics in the Centre for Robert Burns Studies (CRBS), College of Arts, have worked in collaboration with the National Library of Scotland, National Galleries Scotland, National Museums Scotland, Glasgow Life, Dumfries and Galloway Museums and East and South Ayrshire Museums as part of Burns Scotland, created in 2008.

This partnership manages and promotes access to the c.36,000 items relating to Burns in Scottish public collections. They have worked on several exhibitions for Burns Scotland in recent years including Zig Zag: The Paths of Robert Burns and Robert Burns Beyond Text, which appeared across Scotland. The CRBS also worked with the BBC to create a permanent online archive of Burns’ works, including performances by many Scottish celebrities.

Project Parner:
Burns Scotland


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Raising Awareness of Islamic and Japanese Cultures with Children

Dr Saeko Yazaki has been influential in raising awareness of Islamic and Japanese cultures in Britain.
She organized the government funded ‘Contextualising Islam in Britain’ symposia in Cambridge, which discussed what it means to live as a Muslim in Britain today. A second report was published and launched in Glasgow in January 2013. This event involved police forces, city councils, Glasgow Life, Glasgow Forum of Faiths and a number of Muslim organisations.
In Glasgow, she teaches Japanese religion to Japanese children. Although not a subject usually taught in Japan, as it is an integrated part of Japanese society, it allows the children and the wider community to learn about Japanese cultural identity and experience traditional customs.

Academic:
Dr Saeko Yazaki


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Giglets: Scots Ebooks for Schools

Dr Susan Rennie (English Language) is currently collaborating with Giglets in Ayrshire. Giglets produce educational ebooks for children, and Susan is assisting in the production of Scots translations of ebooks for schools. Susan recently contributed a Scots translation of an abridgement of Washington Irving's Legend of Sleepy Hollow (which becomes 'Sleepery Howe’ in Scots). Following on from this, she is now working with eight student translators to produce another four titles in Scots (DraculaMacbeth, Peter Pan, and The Legend of Knockmany).

This project offers our students the chance to be involved in a commercial publishing project, and to be named as co-translators in a final publication. Along the way, they are learning 'on the job' about the mechanics of writing and translating into Scots, and picking up some key editorial skills and experience of working in a creative team. With the introduction of a new SQA Award in Scots Language, there is already increasing demand for schools materials in Scots, and there are likely to be opportunities for new translators to enter the field. However, publishers can sometimes be wary of commissioning untried Scots translators, so this project offers an ideal training ground. There are also plans to put on a workshop for students later in the year, as part of a wider scheme to promote and encourage Scots writing and translation, especially for children.  

Scots is a living language, with many varieties, so it is always exciting to see how new translators approach the task of translation. In research terms, this project has already helped Susan to see immediate, practical applications for the data being compiled for the AHRC Historical Thesaurus of Scots project. The organisation of Scots words and phrases into subject categories, rather than the alphabetical order of a dictionary, will assist both new and experienced translators and writers to hone in on terms that are appropriate to context and historical period as well as being rich and resonant in themselves.

 

Project Partner:
Giglets

Academic:
Dr Susan Rennie


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Soillse - Gaelic Language and Culture

The College of Arts is a partner in the interuniversity project Soillse: The National Research Network for Maintenance and Revitalisation of Gaelic Language and Culture. Funded by the universities, Scottish Funding Council, Highlands and Islands Enterprise and Bòrd na Gàidhlig, the College’s research projects are in the area of corpus development, language planning, the acquisition of Gaelic by learners and how to measure language proficiency, and Gaelic broadcasting.
As part of the corpus development strand, the College has recently been commissioned by Bòrd na Gàidhlig to undertake research on ‘Corpus Planning for Gaelic’, which will set out the foundations for future corpus planning for the Gaelic language.

Partners:
Scottish Funding Council, Highlands and Islands Enterprise, University of Edinburgh, University of Aberdeen, University of the Highlands & Islands and Bòrd na Gàidhlig

Academic:
Prof Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Pilot Gaelic Language Initiative for Scotland’s Universities 2009 – 2011

In 2009, the College of Arts was funded to produce a Gaelic Language Initiative for the development of Gaelic language and culture amongst staff and students.
The University appointed the first Gaelic Language Officer in Scotland’s traditional universities. They developed an annual programme consisting of informal learning opportunities for staff and students, regular cultural events, and stronger links with the Glasgow Gaelic community.
A connected project, the Gaelic Language Residency Scheme, aims to provide young Gaelic speakers with the opportunity to live in a Gaelic environment and use Gaelic as their main language.
The success of the initiative has led to the creation of Gaelic Language Officer posts in the Universities of Edinburgh, Aberdeen and the UHI.

Project Partners:
Bòrd na Gàidhlig, Scottish Government, Scottish Funding Council

Gaelic Language Officer:
Fiona Dunn

Contact:
arts-ke@glasgow.ac.uk


Developing an Academic Programme with a Global Auction House

Christie’s Education and the University of Glasgow have been working together since 1987 when Juliet Kinchin was appointed as Course Director of the Decorative Arts Master’s programme within the then History of Art Department at the University of Glasgow. Juliet Kinchin is now Curator in the Department of Architecture and Design at MoMA in New York.
The success of this venture led to Christie’s Education establishing a Master’s Programme in London and Juliet’s successor, Ian Cox, was appointed as Director of the Master’s in Art, Style and Design (or Fine and Decorative Arts as it was then known). Ian Cox is now running the Christie’s Education New York Decorative Arts Summer School. Christie’s Education London became an Associated Institute of the University of Glasgow.

Project Partners:
Christie’s Education

Academic:
Prof Nick Pearce


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Teaching Latin in Schools

Since 2013 the College of Arts has been collaborating with the UK-wide charity The Iris Project to teach Latin to children in Glasgow. In the first year of the project, three schools and over 90 children from Glasgow’s East End were taught by student volunteers from the Classics department.

Latin’s strict grammar rules and its connections to the English language help to improve literacy and aid the learning of modern foreign languages. Learning Latin also introduces children to the ancient world with themes such as Roman food, gladiators and Pompeii.

The teaching is also a fantastic opportunity for the Classics students to gain experience. In 2014, a further two primary schools were added to the project along with St Mungo’s Academy. 

Project Partner: 
The Iris Project

Academics: 
Jennifer HilderProfessor Matthew Fox


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Gaelic Language Corpus

Within the College of Arts, two related research projects were established in 2006 and 2008 respectively: Digital Archive of Scottish Gaelic and Corpas na Gàidhlig. Both are funded by British Academy, Scottish Funding Council, Bòrd na Gàidhlig and the Scottish Government. They provide the primary materials for innovative research on the Gaelic language, future technological developments (including apps), and a comprehensive historical dictionary of the Gaelic language.
The College was also commissioned by Bòrd na Gàidhlig to research the development of Gaelic corpus technology. This resulted in a published report, which sets out recommendations and a roadmap for future development.
Academics have produced widely used Gaelic learning books and materials, as well as an annual literary journal: Aiste: Studies in Gaelic Literature.

Project Partners:
British Academy, Scottish Funding Council, Bòrd na Gàidhlig, Scottish Government

Academic:
Prof Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh



To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Name Studies at the University of Glasgow

The Scottish Toponymy in Transition (STIT) project aims to research and publish three volumes of the place-names of Kinross-shire, Clackmannanshire and Menteith, in addition to beginning research on the place-names of Berwickshire and Ayrshire.
The project team from the College of Arts is actively engaging the public with events such as place-name walks, talks to local history societies and putting on exhibitions. The project is also working with Education Scotland to produce place-name resources for the school curriculum.
The College has particular expertise in the study of names (Onomastics) with a lively academic community researching place- and personal names throughout Scotland. Potential areas for future work include developing place-name apps and walks for the tourist industry.

Partner:

Education Scotland

Academics:

Prof Carole HoughDr Elia Williamson, Prof Thomas Clancy, Dr Simon Taylor


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Britské listy

Dr Jan Culik edits and publishes the widely read Czech language journal Britské listy. This is a cultural and political journal, which currently has 2.9 million readers each year. Czech politicians and decision makers read the journal, a fact that has led to consultations between academics and top politicians. The website has also featured in contemporary Czech fiction.
The website for the journal appears in both Czech and English, the Czech version being the most popular. As it is widely known that the editor-in-chief is an academic in the University of Glasgow College of Arts, there is considerable recognition of and publicity for the institution in the country.

Partner:
The Britské listy Public Association

Academic:
Dr Jan Culik


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Creative Writing in the College of Arts

A College of Arts academic has a strong relationship with BBC Radio 4. Elizabeth Reeder is a Lecturer in Creative Writing, and a prolific writer of fiction, with novels and short stories and numerous radio programmes to her credit.
Her broadcasts for BBC Radio 4 include a Women’s Hour Serial, stories, and abridgments of Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead, Sara Wheeler’s Magnetic North and Annie Proulx’s Bird Cloud.
Elizabeth’s novel Ramshackle was shortlisted for the prestigious 2012 Saltire Prize, and widely – and favourably -- reviewed; it was published by Freight Books, one of the wave of ‘indie’ presses through which some of the most exciting and innovative fiction is now being published.

Academic:
Dr Elizabeth Reeder


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Reaching out to Industry with Student Placements in Translation Studies

The MSc in Translation Studies has been designed and approved with industry collaboration in mind. Translation industry experts, from members of organisations based in Scotland such as DNA Language, Glasgow, and freelance translators, have been invited to the College of Arts to deliver material to the students that they have designed themselves.
Students benefit from the way in which the course successfully blends theoretical content with practice and industry contribution. In the future, students will be offered placements with translation organisations and relevant professions. Academics also hope to make the most of contacts within agencies such as The Word Gym in Scotland, and beyond. They also aim to develop relationships with publishers such as Canongate Books (Edinburgh) and Arcadia Books (London).

Academic:
Dr Georgina Collins


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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A Traveller’s Guide to Literary Scotland

In partnership with VisitScotland and the Association of Scottish Literary Studies (ASLS), Alan Riach, Professor of Scottish Literature, produced a Traveller’s Guide to Literary Scotland. The guide won the 2011 Gold Award for Best Publication at the Chartered Institute of Public Relations PRide awards, and is available in printed form in all VisitScotland Information Centres and to download.
‘The guide pinpoints the stunning settings for world-famous novels, the scenery that inspired poets and the birthplaces of some of the country’s most distinguished writers. It’s a treasure trove of information. From the highbrow to the child-friendly, the guide is useful for anyone curious about our story-tellers. It’s an ideal way to improve your knowledge of Scotland’s great literary and cultural offerings. (Daily Record)

Partner:
VisitScotland, ASLS

Download the guide:
www.scotland.org/features/a-travellers-guide-to-literary-scotland


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The Road to Independence

Professor Murray Pittock’s, The Road to Independence: Scotland Since the Sixties, was first published by Reaction Books in 2008. So timely was the book in its relevance to Scottish and European politics that a Catalan edition, El camí cap a la independencia, was also published, with a foreword by Scotland’s First Minister, Alex Salmond.

Murray became a regular contributor to high-level debates about Scottish independence in the press and media, and was engaged as a participant on governmental advisory groups. He convened the National Champions Group for Scottish Studies in 2011-13. Following the Scottish National Party’s success in the 2011 Scottish Parliament Elections, the movement towards the Referendum of 18th September 2014 and, indeed, the book’s previous success, a comprehensively rewritten study was published in 2014: The Road to Independence?: Scotland in the Balance. The Daily Telegraph rated the book one of five must reads on independence and Bella Caledonia included it in a list of the best 24 books on Scottish nationality in the last century.

The argument of the book was summarized in the Radio 4 series The Roots of Scottish Nationalism, which had an aggregate audience of 6.25 million across its 5 episodes and an audience rating of 81%; The Week also published a condensed briefing on the Referendum taken from the book, Independence for Scotland? The book was launched in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Belfast: in the last location, it was No. 1 Northern Ireland political story on the day and No. 1 NI political story on Twitter. Throughout 2014, Murray commented for government and other agencies on documents and speeches before release, and presented on the Scottish brand and its export markets at Dynamic Earth in Edinburgh in August and elsewhere, as well as twice briefing Russell Group communications directors on the Scottish situation. The book’s ideas received media coverage in the UK, US, Australia, Brazil, Chile, China, France, Germany, Ghana, Haiti, Ireland, al-Jazeera, Pakistan, Portugal, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Switzerland and Turkey in outlets from the Financial Times to Nature, and Murray appeared live on Russia Today from Moscow at 7pm on the day after the Referendum, generating in all around 160 media and 260 social media appearances with c6300 YouTube video views.

In April 2014, Murray visited the Keogh-Naughton Centre for Irish Studies at Notre Dame to participate in the National Endowment for the Humanities seminar on ‘The Public Sphere in the Four Nations’, being cited as ‘Scotland’s leading public intellectual’.

Academic:
Prof Murray Pittock


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Introducing the works of Ivan Bunin to a new generation

The work of Andrei Rogatchevski, an academic in the College of Arts, has brought the work of Ivan Bunin to a new public by supporting new translations of his books. Bunin (1870-1953) was Russia’s first Nobel Prize winner for literature and was originally published in England by Hogarth Press. Rogartchevski found previously unknown letters in the Hogarth Press archive that began to uncover new aspects of the writer’s life and works.

This research encouraged Alma Books (Independent Publisher of the Year 2013) to ask Rogatchevski to contribute ‘extra material’ to their reissue of Bunin’s Dark Avenues, adding significantly to the reader’s knowledge and experience of the text.

Project Partner: 
Alma Books

Academic: 
Dr Andrei Rogatchevski


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Development of Gaelic Language Plan for the University of Glasgow

The University of Glasgow was asked to prepare a Gaelic Language Plan for the University of Glasgow in 2011 under the terms of the Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005. This is a fantastic example of cross-university collaboration meeting the needs of Government legislation.
This official policy was launched in March 2013 and involves the development of Gaelic language and culture within the context of key functions identified by Bòrd na Gàidhlig, the national development agency for Gaelic, including: Communications, Staffing, Publications and Identity.
In addition, the university will incorporate Gaelic into the Student Experience at Glasgow in a number of ways, to continue the work of the pioneering Gaelic Language Initiative established in 2009.

Partner:
Bòrd na Gàidhlig


Gaelic Language Officer:
Fiona Dunn


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Judging the Wolfson History Prize

Professor Julia Smith (Edwards Chair in Medieval History) collaborates with the Wolfson Foundation as one of the four Judges of the annual Wolfson History Prize. The Wolfson History Prize is awarded annually to promote and encourage standards of excellence in the writing of history for the general public. The prize is awarded to UK citizens; the winning books may be published anywhere.

In this forum, Julia makes a major contribution to shaping public engagement with the discipline of History, and indirectly, the Humanities more generally.  The Prize attracts considerable national press coverage, influences the purchases and tastes of the reading public; significantly enhances the sales of the winning titles; and benchmarks the highest standards of historical scholarship in the UK for academic and non-academic readers and authors alike.  Prizewinning volumes have to combine original, imaginative approaches with superb technical scholarship, without any loss of readability or accessibility. The annual prize-giving is one of the main UK forums where History as a discipline engages in knowledge exchange. 

Further information can be found by following the link to the Wolfson History Prize

 

Academic:
Prof Julia Smith


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Breaking Down the Barriers of Engagement with Writing

Zoe Strachan is the author of three novels: Ever Fallen in Love, Spin Cycle and Negative Space, and has taught on the Glasgow Creative Writing Programme since 2003. Her short stories and essays have been included in numerous journals and anthologies, she contributes to various newspapers and magazines and her work has been broadcast on BBC Radio 4 and Radio 3.
As well as receiving numerous international fellowships, in recent years Zoe has engaged with interdisciplinary projects. She has collaborated on the exhibition and publication ‘I throw my prayers into the sky’ (Internationales Künstlerhaus Villa Concordia, Germany) and theatre productions with the Citizens Theatre and Oran Mor, Glasgow. Zoe’s most recent high-profile work has been in opera.

Academic:
Zoe Strachan


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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‘How British is Scotland?’ and ‘Vox Populi’ in the Scottish Press

Over the past two years, the Centre for Scottish and Celtic Studies has worked with the Scottish Press to publish essays in newspapers based upon public lectures and seminars at Glasgow.  In 2012-13, essays from the 'Vox Populi: The Voice of the Scottish People in History' series were published in The Scotsman, and in 2014-15 essays from the 'How British is Scotland?' series were published in The Herald. The articles were composed by the speakers, and appeared on or near the date of the lecture.

This collaboration enabled the Centre for Scottish and Celtic Studies to advertise their public lectures, and to convey research findings to wider, non-academic audiences through short articles. In turn, the Scottish press and the general public benefitted from engaged and informed cultural, historical and political commentary in the run up to the Independence Referendum on the 18th September 2014.

'Vox Populi' Articles and Podcasts
'How British is Scotland?' Podcasts

Project Partner:
Various Scottish Press

Academic:
Dr Karin Bowie and Dr Catriona Macdonald


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Compiling & Publishing the Historical Thesaurus

The Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary (HT) was published in 2009 by academics in the College of Arts. It is a major new resource for the English language and has already had a widespread impact. It was named book of the year in The Guardian and the Times Literary Supplement. It is currently in its fourth print run in three years with sales revenue of approximately £1.6 million of global sales, brining economic benefit to the publishing industry.

In 2010 the HT was integrated with the online Oxford English Dictionary, forming a single accessible resource. It has been widely used by international academics and historical novelists such as Mary Robinette Kowal, Geraldine Brooks and Philip Pullman.

Project Partner:
Oxford English Dictionary


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Writing about Robert Burns for an International Audience

The Centre for Robert Burns Studies (CRBS) regularly engages with industry as part of the Culture and Heritage partnership Burns Scotland (the national Burns collection). CRBS engages in writing and publishing activities in order to disseminate research about the life and works of Scotland's most universally famous literary figure: Robert Burns (1759 - 1796). As part of a major AHRC-funded project led by Professor Gerard Carruthers - 'Editing Robert Burns for the 21st Century' - the project team are producing a multi-volume edition of the works of Robert Burns for publication by Oxford University Press.

The CRBS team also regularly compose and contribute to texts for publication in the Scottish Press (recently, The Guardian, The Herald, The Scotsman, The Daily Record); exhibition texts (for both museum-based and online exhibitions); and texts for publication online and as part of Apps (for example, the US-based 'Robert Burns Lives!' online periodical, and an interactive timeline authored for the Scottish government's Robert Burns App and due to be published in 2015). The team also contribute to book festivals, most recently 'Aye Write' (2014) where a research-based drama documentary about the activities of 'Antique Smith' (a famous nineteenth-century Burns forger), co-authored by Professor Carruthers, was performed for the first time.

The Centre's engagement with industry and the general public through writing and publishing activities ensures that research undertaken at CRBS reaches the extensive worldwide community of scholars and enthusiasts who are interested in Scottish culture and the national bard.

Project Partner:
Burns Scotland
Oxford University Press
Various Scottish Press

Academic:
Prof. Gerard Carruthers

 

To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Writing & Publishing: Translating Dialogue into Old French for the History Channel series, ‘Vikings’

Dr James Simpson (Reader in French) has been translating dialogue for the upcoming third season of the History Channel series, Vikings, which centres on the Viking raids on Paris in the mid ninth century.

James has contributed his research and linguistic expertise in order to translate modern idiomatic dialogue into the language of the period (referred to as Old French), both at the script-writing stage and when the cast are on set. James’s work in this respect has proven so effective that the use of Old French in the series has increased as a result.

James’s collaboration on Vikings ensures confidence in the dialogue, enhances the authenticity of the production, and raises awareness of James’s research/discipline beyond the academy.

As James comments: ‘Engaging in this sort of reconstruction is hard work, but it’s also tremendous fun. The Viking raiding and exploration that began in the eighth century had an immense impact on European cultures, and the Vikings settled and assimilated in a number of places. The Vikings programme shows the main characters encountering new languages, customs and ideas. Of course it’s fun to see films and TV series that use other languages, whether historical or invented, because it pretty much always adds to the flavour. However, what’s particularly interesting about this show is that the historical dialogue highlights problems of contact, understanding and identity in very thoughtful ways, with the characters themselves curious about new things and new words, but also wondering how those new perspectives will transform them and their own culture. And, without giving anything away, Season Three continues in that vein – only more so, because going to France changes everybody.’

 

Project Partner:
History Channel

Academic:
Dr James Simpson


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The ‘Life Cycle’ of Literature

As part of his work in literary translation between French and English, Professor Michael Syrotinski (Marshall Chair of French) works as part of a network that brings together academics, colleagues at the British Library, contemporary French writers, translators, publishers of contemporary fiction, and literary journalists, both in the UK and France.

The aim of the network is to explore the 'life cycle' of a work of literature, from composition, through to publication, public reception, teaching text, translation, reception of the translation, etc, from both an academic and non-academic perspective. As such, the research network offers a unique insight into the production of literature that will benefit the publishing industry in each country.

 

Project Partner:
Network

Academic:
Prof Michael Syrotinski


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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