Heritage and History

Heritage and History

Heritage and History KE Case Studies

Heritage and History KE Case Studies

Runaway Slaves in Britain: Bondage, Freedom and Race in the Eighteenth Century

Professor Simon Newman, assisted by post-doctoral fellow Dr Stephen Mullen and PhD candidate Nelson Mundell, has embarked on a research project which investigates the lives of runaway slaves in Scotland and England prior to the abolition of slavery in Britain. The objective of the Leverhulme Trust funded project is to analyse the runaway slave advertisements which were featured in newspapers, which can offer us an insight into the attitudes and racial demographics of eighteenth century British society. Another aim of the project is to compile a searchable online database of runaway slave advertisements as an educational resource for schools. Newman and his team have engaged with school teachers, and they have also acted as historical advisers for Glasgow Life and Glasgow Museums as part of a series of exhibitions and events which showcased Glasgow's history within the British Empire during the Commonwealth Games period.

To find out more you can visit the project website. 

Academic: Professor Simon Newman 

Project Partners: The Leverhulme Trust, Glasgow Museums, Glasgow Life 

 

To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or by phone (0141 330 3885) 


Centre for Battlefield Archaeology – Policy and Consultancy

The Centre for Battlefield Archaeology has been working on the Inventory of Scottish Battlefields since 2006.  Working closely with Historic Scotland, the Centre created the site entries, the site boundaries and provided the information that was used to write the battlefields section of the Scottish Historic Environment Policy.  
The Centre has provided training sessions on battlefields with Historic Scotland for planners in local councils, for Historic Scotland casework staff and for heritage organisations.  The Centre provided consultancy on the development of management plans for battlefields, and has produced the guidance on minimum standards for mitigation work on battlefields within the Inventory.  The Centre is available for consultation on approaches to battlefields and has undertaken a series of community projects on battlefields across Scotland; the Centre is currently running the largest investigation of the Battle of Bannockburn ever to have taken place.

Partner: Historic Scotland

Academic:

Dr Iain Banks, Dr Tony Pollard


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Georgian Glasgow

Staff and postgraduate students in the School of Humanities are working closely with Glasgow Museums in the development of the ‘Georgian Glasgow’ exhibition, which will run in the Kelvingrove Museum between 2nd April and 17th August 2014.
Part of the exhibit explores the connections between Glasgow and New World colonial slavery, and School staff are developing a symposium in which presentations will develop from particular artefacts in the exhibit. These presentations, along with digital images of the artefacts, will be mounted on a website for use by school learners and students around the world.

Partner:

Glasgow Museums, Glasgow Life

Academic:

Prof Simon Newman


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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TheGlasgowStory

Ever wondered who lived in your house or street before the First World War? Or how the city was laid out before a multitude of urban regeneration projects and motorway-building schemes altered the face of the city, sweeping away streets and entire neighbourhoods in the process? TheGlasgowStory tells the story of Glasgow in words and pictures. It includes tales from some of Scotland’s best writers and is illustrated with thousands of images from the collections of the city’s world-famous libraries, museums and universities.  Partners in this ground-breaking initiative led by HATII included Glasgow Museums and Art Galleries, Mitchell Library, Scottish Screen Archive, Scottish Enterprise Glasgow, Strathclyde University and Glasgow Caledonian University.

Website:

http://www.theglasgowstory.com/index.php


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Historic Govan

Between 2007 and 2009, Professor Driscoll was commissioned by Historic Scotland to evaluate the archaeological and architectural heritage of Govan as part of the government’s Burgh Survey programme. This study produced the first comprehensive mapping of Govan’s physical cultural heritage assets. The Geographical Information System (GIS) built for the study was adopted by the West of Scotland Archaeology Service (2008) for use in evaluating planning applications. The narrative account, resource evaluation and recommendations were published as Historic Govan (2009) accompanied by a suite of historical maps. Although part of a series aimed primarily at planners, Driscoll and his team varied the format to make it more attractive to a popular audience.

Driscoll subsequently contributed to the Govan Workspace Options Appraisal (2008-10), which sought to identify a sustainable future for the church and its collection of medieval sculpture. The proposal was to transform the church into a museum/cultural resource centre capable of providing impetus to the regeneration of Govan. The first stage aimed at improved access and interpretative resources to make the church site attractive to tourists; the second stage included a major refurbishment to combine commercial rental space (in the basement of the old church) with state-of-the-art displays in the main body of the church.

Funding for the first phase (£120,000) was secured in 2011 from the Heritage Lottery Fund, Historic Scotland, the Church of Scotland and other sponsors.  Professor Driscoll has applied his expertise to interpret the history and meaning behind the sculptures and was a primary contributor to the new display, known as the Govan Stones project (www.thegovanstones.org.uk),  installed and launched in 2012.

Website:

www.thegovanstones.org.uk

Academic:

Prof Stephen Driscoll

 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Mapping the Practice and Profession of Sculpture in Britain and Ireland 1851-1951

The project delivers the results of the first comprehensive study of sculpture between the Great Exhibition of 1851, and the Festival of Britain in 1951. This was the first authoritative study of sculptors, related businesses and trades investigated in the context of creative collaborations, art infrastructures, professional networks and cultural geographies.
The HATII-developed database is the main outcome of the research and contains over 50,000 records about sculptural practice, connected by means over 380,000 relationships. In collaboration with History of Art at the University of Glasgow, external partners on Mapping Sculpture included the Victoria & Albert Museum and the Henry Moore Institute.

Website:

http://sculpture.gla.ac.uk/

 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Awakening Annandale's Past

A unique collaborative project involving experts from across the University of Glasgow’s College of Arts is reviving one of Scotland’s most iconic lost whisky distilleries.

The Annandale Distillery (pictured above) in Dumfriesshire has been dormant since 1919. However, thanks to three projects led by University academics, all this is changing; whisky will be produced in Annan once more.

For new distillery owner, Prof David Thomson, the resurrection is far more than a business investment. Having grown up in the area, the distillery symbolizes a re-development of a place that he holds a great deal of passion for. To help him achieve this, teams from the College of Arts have been working with David to restore, not only the buildings, but also the lost history and culture of the Annandale Distillery.

“Developing Annandale back to a working distillery will bring investment, tourism and jobs into to the area,” says David. “However, also key for me is the opportunity to reconnect the distillery with the history of Annandale so that it also holds meaning for the locals of Annan.”

Since David took over the site in 2007 the renovation project has been a long and difficult journey, and a journey that input from the College of Arts has certainly made easier and more rewarding.

Initially, in the absence of any detailed paperwork and drawings, the layout and uses of the various outbuildings on-site was difficult to ascertain. “As it was intended that the distillery was to become a tourism destination and point of historical significance, it was important to account correctly for the buildings as they are now and as they might have been in the past,” said David.

To chart the physical history of the site, Dr John Atkinson and a team from Archaeology, in the School of Humanities, embarked on a three-month investigation, drawing up a detailed report tracing the evolution of the buildings. This report, facilitated by pump-priming funding via a First Step Award from the University of Glasgow’s Innovation Network, was used to inform the development decisions in advance of planning applications.

However, just as important for David was the chance to tell the story of the distillery through the ages. He set to work alongside Prof Ted Cowan in Scottish History to build up a history of then area and ensure that the volumes of information pertaining to Annan were made available to the public. After much painstaking research an Innovation Voucher was facilitated via Interface so that the public visiting the Distillery could learn more about the history of the area.

Finally, a project with Prof John Corbett of the School of Critical Studies was established to provide information vital to the development of the distillery’s brand and marketing. Praising the work of everyone at the College of Arts and the vision of David in making this venture a success, Director of the Centre for Robert Burns Studies, Prof Gerry Carruthers (School of Critical Studies), said: “David and Annandale Distillery Ltd are an excellent example of how small developing companies can tap into the rich knowledge base available via the College of Arts”. 

Speaking about the collaboration, David said: “Parallel to my passion for an excellent Single Malt Whisky is my passion for Robert Burns. I’m looking forward to working closely with the Centre for Robert Burns Studies, to develop a cohesive and compelling brand for Annandale Distillery. On top of this I would like to record my appreciation of the College of Arts for their vital help to the development of the Annandale Distillery, I know that we will stay committed partners.”

 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The Tenant Experience in Social Housing

East Kilbride was designated Scotland's first new town in 1947. Situated on a hilly site in the lower Clyde valley just 8 miles south of the city of Glasgow, it was originally planned as a self-contained town with a population of around 45,000. By 1960 the target population was increased to 70,000. Today East Kilbride is home to 74,012 people.

Homes in East Kilbride were marketed by the Development Corporation as 'modern' and, in comparison with the older housing stock in Scottish towns and cities, these new dwellings were far better equipped. A 1952 article in the Hamilton Advertiser described the new flats as 'a housewives' dream' with built-in wardrobes, pram stores in the entrance hall, a heated towel rail and a kitchenette complete with a gas boiler and built-in cabinets.

It was the belief of the town planners that high quality 'modern' housing in a planned environment would promote a sense of health and wellbeing among residents, improving their quality of life.

As one of the current providers of social housing in the town, East Kilbride & District Housing Association (EKDHA) owns and manages 512 houses available for social rent. Says Mairi Brown Director of EKDHA:

“Like all housing associations, EKDHA is legally obliged to carry out consultations with tenants. It is also committed to providing maximum opportunity and support to tenants and seeks to shape future policy and practice. However, as a small housing association, EKDHA has limited resources for research, therefore engaging with a research intensive institution such as the University of Glasgow seemed the logical step.” 

Using a First Step Award to finance the project, EKDHA engaged directly with Prof Lynn Abrams (History, School of Humanities) to conduct research on their behalf.

“The project aimed to explore the degree to which East Kilbride has met people's expectations and aspirations in terms of housing, local environment and quality of life,” explained Prof Abrams (pictured above).

“In contrast to surveys which assess satisfaction at a particular moment, we aimed to investigate how people's relationships with their homes have altered over their life course. This could be in response to the shifting needs of the family structure, but also to income, age or reaction to the changing character and infrastructure of East Kilbride since 1947.”

The research, which was conducted via a series of oral history interviews with long-term residents, revealed high levels of satisfaction with new town housing and the new town way of life, with respondents commenting on the modern style of homes, the sense of community and the positive sense of wellbeing experienced in the town’s early years.

“The outputs from this project delivered far more than we would have been able to undertake independently of the College of Arts. The process of engaging with the College was easier than we anticipated and, now that the relationship with Lynn and her group has been established, we would not hesitate to call on their knowledge base again,”  said Ms Brown.

 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Landscape Governance and Development

The College of Arts has an established track record in the fields of landscape policy and practice. With partners in Scotland and across Europe, the College engages with the landscape’s past in order to realise the environmental, social, cultural and economic benefits for the future.
The College’s MSc in Landscape: Integrated Research & Practice works with industry to train the next generation of landscape researchers and practitioners. PhD research has also been developed in collaboration
with external partners to be both policy- and practice-orientated.
Many cross-discipline and cross-sector conferences and workshops help to set the agenda for innovative policy- and practice-orientated research.
Specific projects aim to develop new landscape governance and development philosophies and practices.

Partners:
Recent and current collaborators include Northlight Heritage, the Mediterranean Institute for Nature and Anthropos, ProGenus Environmental Ltd., the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS) and the Landscape Research Group.

Academics:

Dr Chris Dalglish, Dr Kenny Brophy


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Place-name research supports local investment

Academics in the College of Arts have helped local initiatives in Scotland to access over £4.5 million worth of Heritage Lottery funding. Working with Discover Bute and the Living Lomonds Landscape Partnership (LLLP), academics from the Scottish place-name projects advised how place-name research could form part of their Heritage Landscape Parternship (HLP) bids. Academics provided a vision of how the communities could be involved in the projects and how the projects could develop.

With Discover Bute, their work resulted in data collection by local residents, which required training workshops from the academics on the phonetic alphabet and recording pronunciation and spatial data, as well as ethical concerns. These projects give people a sense of ownership of their own heritage which is empowering for local communities.

Project Partner: 
Discover Bute, Living Lomonds Landscape Partnership


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Sculptured stones: Transforming monument management policy

Working with Historic Scotland, an academic in the College of Arts has transformed the management of 1,800 monuments in Scotland and vastly improved the experience of 50,000 visitors to Iona Abbey every year. Katherine Forsyth helped to produce Historic Scotland’s ‘Carved Stones: Scottish Executive Policy and Guidance’, which governs their approach to the conservation, maintenance and display of all carved stones in Scotland.

Following Forsyth’s approach, Historic Scotland redesigned Iona Museum in 2013 to focus on her interpretations of individual monuments. The new display brings out the over-arching significance of the site as a whole, which Forsyth discovered was originally intended to mirror the layout of other holy sites. Forsyth’s approach was also used in the redisplay of Whithorn Priory (2005) and St Vigeans Museum (2009).

Project Partner:
Historic Scotland

Academic:
Dr Katherine Forsyth


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Restoration of Stirling Castle Palace

An academic in the College of Arts has helped to transform Stirling Castle Palace, making it the UK’s top heritage attraction in a 2012 Which? survey. Visitor numbers went up by 17% the year after it opened with a rise of over £1million in revenue for Stirling Castle. The research of Sally Rush informed how the material culture of the James V period should be displayed, allowing Historic Scotland to redecorate six apartments of the royal palace in the original style of c.1538.

The most impressive aspect of the renovation is the exhibition of the Stirling Heads, once part of the Palace ceilings. Thanks to Rush’s identification and interpretation of each individual head, they are now displayed in a purpose-built gallery and the stories they tell enhance the visitor experience.

Project Partner: 
Historic Scotland

Academic: 
Dr Sally Rush


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Remembering Women in Scotland

Academics in the Centre for Gender History, part of the College of Arts, have worked closely with Glasgow Women’s Library to deliver workshops and other public events. They worked together on the Women of Scotland project with Women’s History Scotland and Girl Guiding Scotland, using a Lottery Awards for All grant, and as a result they have helped to map memorials of over 300 women in Scotland.

Girl Guides participated in the ‘Big Name Hunt’ to find memorials in their local area and gain their ‘Heritage Badge’. Where memorials couldn’t be found, one Girl Guide troop campaigned for a memorial to be established. The project is now being rolled out nationwide through the Glasgow Women’s Library’s outreach programme.

Project Partner:

Glasgow Women's Library, Girl Guiding Scotland


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Creating a global resource for provenance research

Professor Nick Pearce’s current project builds on the study of provenance (the history of ownership of a work of art), an area of research which has come into focus in recent years. Working with the Freer-Sackler Gallery, he will help to develop a fully searchable database of Asian art confiscated, transferred, looted or destroyed before and during World War II under the Nazi regime.

Database entries will be linked to the objects in the Freer-Sackler online collections that were either acquired through or at some point owned by a given collector or dealer. Additional information will also assist in recreating the chain of object ownership. A bibliography and the location of archival records also will be added to the site.

The web resource will also link to the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art (AAA), where there are ongoing efforts to make resources accessible online. With the addition of the images, and the possibility of linking with still other institutions in the UK and Europe, this site can become a powerful search engine for provenance research and a global resource for research in Asian art provenance.

Project Partner: 
Freer-Sackler

Academic: 
Professor Nick Pearce

Project Website: 
www.asia.si.edu/collections/ww2provenance.asp


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Communicating the First World War

Glasgow University’s Great War is a research project based in the University Archives and run by Dr Tony Pollard (History / Archaeology). The project has worked closely with non-HEI partners to explore the experiences of the university community during WWI. For example, the project partnered with the City of Glasgow’s wider WWI project, participating in the 4 August 2014 Commonwealth centenary commemorations and contributing research to the city’s spectacular 11 November light display in George Square. The project also participates in national WWI initiatives organised by The National Archives and the Imperial War Museum.

Furthermore, the Great War Project engages with the wider community by offering students hands-on research training through the University’s Club 21 internship scheme. Student placements use primary sources in the University Archives to explore a range of themes and then conduct further research by working with external organisations such as Friends of Glasgow Necropolis, at the Royal Highland Fusiliers Museum and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow.

Project Partner: 
National Archives, Imperial War Museum, Friends of Glasgow Necropolis, Royal Highland Fusiliers Museum, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow.

Academic: 
Dr Tony Pollard

Project Website: 
http://www.gla.ac.uk/greatwar / @GlasgowUniWW1


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Raising awareness of Irish-Scottish connections

Professor Willy Maley, through his work in Irish-Scottish studies ­ in theatre, journalism, and popular culture, as well as critical writing ­has longstanding links with the Irish community in Scotland as a public speaker and community activist. Most recently, he presented a paper on Irish and Scottish Catholic responses to the Spanish Civil War at an event organised by the Irish Heritage Foundation in December 2014, subsequently published in the January edition of the community newspaper The Irish Voice.

Through his contacts with the Irish Heritage Foundation Maley was invited to be part of the 1916 Rising Centenary Committee (Scotland), together with Kirsty Lusk, a PhD student whom he is supervising, who is working on Parnell to Partition: Irish-Scottish Connections, 1880-1921. The committee aims to organise a series of public events marking the centenary of the Easter Rising, raising awareness of the Scottish context and its implications for Ireland and the wider world through seminars and discussions.

Maley and Lusk are also editing a special issue of the journal Irish Studies Review for 2016 entitled Commemorating Connolly: Contexts, Comparisons and Celtic Connections, which will bring together creative and critical responses to the Rising, with contributions by academic and activists. This will place James Connolly in his Scottish and Irish contexts, including his reception among Gaelic readers and writers, and examine the crucial role of women in the events of 1916, including Coatbridge-born Margaret Skinnider.

Project Partner: 
Irish Heritage Foundation, Irish Studies Review.

Academic: 
Professor Willy Maley


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Establishing the Medical Humanities movement

The research of academics in the College of Arts has changed the way medical students across the UK study. The College of Arts was the first to offer humanities modules to medical students. The importance of medical humanities for doctors and patients is now widely recognised and is offered by thirty of the UK’s 32 medical schools.

In Glasgow, academics collaborate with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde as part of the Glasgow Medical Humanities Unit. Creative Scotland has also funded further research into the healing environment and the role of visual arts in improving patients’ experiences, resulting in new modules being offered to medical students.

Project Partner:
NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Locating Bannockburn at 700

Academics from the Centre for Battlefield Archaeology (CBA) are teaming up with the BBC and several conservation bodies in an attempt to answer one of Scotland's biggest historical mysteries: the exact location of the Battle of Bannockburn.

The BBC will be working with academics from the College of Arts to mark the 700th anniversary of the battle by following the progress of a new archaeological dig which will attempt to clear up the uncertainty surrounding one of the most important dates in Scottish history.

The programme, due to be filmed over 18 months and broadcast in Spring 2014, reunites the successful partnership of Neil Oliver (below left) and College of Arts Archaeologist Dr Tony Pollard (below right) from 2003’s ‘Two Men in a Trench’ series.

“The BBC are keen to create a programme on the true history of the battle of Bannockburn and attempt to identify the real locations,” said the BBC’s Richard Downs. “The team at the Centre for Battlefield Archaeology were always the natural choice for this project. The expertise of Dr Iain Banks and Dr Tony Pollard is unique, however coupled with Pollard and Oliver’s past successes the partnership was a perfect fit.”

Funding for the project is a three-way initiative. The National Trust for Scotland own the area of land around the flagpole and the iconic statute of Robert Bruce, where, to date, the majority of excavation work has taken place. The project findings will be incorporated into the new visitor centre being constructed to mark the 700th Anniversary, with support from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Derek Alexander, Head of Archaeological Services for the National Trust for Scotland, explained: “We are very excited about working in partnership with Iain and Tony on this project. They are widely regarded as the leading battlefield archaeology experts in the country and will be key to the success of the investigations. Partnering with the BBC will allow us to successfully communicate the findings to the wider public, something both Iain and Tony also have a great deal of experience with.”

A related but separate project will focus on lands around Cambuskenneth Abbey. This is the location of the Parliament where Robert the Bruce requested that all landowners attend and pledge allegiance to Scotland shortly after the battle in November 1314 or be disinherited and lose all their lands in Scotland. This investigation will be grant-funded by the Conservation Foundation in conjunction with Insight Vacations, who last year sponsored the Centre’s project at Mont St Quentin on World War One's Western Front.

Dr Banks explained the importance of the project:

“The Battle of Bannockburn is an iconic moment in Scottish history. We have a lot of historical evidence about the battle, from Scottish sources and English sources, but what we don’t have is any physical evidence of exactly where the battle took place. Eight different locations have been proposed for where the fighting took place but no one knows which of these is correct. There are no confirmed artefacts that could evidence any of these as a battlefield. However, equally important as finding evidence of a battle site is understanding the physical and human geography of the area.”

Dr Pollard added: “Finding medieval battlefields using archaeological techniques is notoriously difficult but what we have here is the opportunity to subject the landscape in which the battle took place to a thorough multi-faceted investigation, which, whatever the results of the archaeology, will provide a unique insight into the events of 1314. We did limited work there ten years ago for Two Men in a Trench, but came away with more questions and answers, so for Neil, myself and the rest of the team this is unfinished business.”

The project is set to run until late 2013. Whether the resulting TV programmes will turn out to be myth-busters is in the hands of the archaeologists.

Academic:

Dr Tony Pollard


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Reconnecting and Recreating 19th Century Scottish Textile Manufacture

ReINVENT is an innovative interdisciplinary partnership between the College of Arts and National Museums Scotland (NMS) to enhance the display and interpretation of Scotland’s rich textile manufacturing heritage, including the inspirational new £12 million galleries for NMS’ Scottish Science and Technology and European Art and Design collections. It returns objects and archives to their forgotten contexts: how, when, where or why they were made, and the feats of technology this entailed.
ReINVENT unites the expertise of conservation scientists, curators, conservators, archivists, and historians. In a research collaboration between the College of Arts, School of Chemistry and the University’s Scottish Business Archive they are endeavouring to recreate the famous Turkey red dye.

Project Partner: National Museums Scotland

Academics:

Dr Anita Quye


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Dirty Stories

‘Dirty Stories’ is a collaborative exchange between experts in conservation science and conservation from the College of Arts with analytical chemical science experts at the University of Aberdeen.
The project aims to help curators and conservators make informed decisions about whether or not to remove sooty deposits on historical textiles. Sooty deposits can be invaluable evidence of the object’s maker or owner and its provenance, but can equally detract from the object’s appearance if they obscure informative details or, worse, cause degradation of the object.
The results of the collaborative research will be translated into practical, cost-effective solutions that heritage organisations like the National Trust for Scotland (NTS) can apply themselves.


Project Partner:

The National Trust for Scotland

Academics:

Dr Anita Quye, Karen Thompson


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Conservation of the Flag of the Formosa Republic

The Flag of the Formosa Republic, or the Tiger Flag, is in the collection of the National Taiwan Museum. It is a copy of one made in 1895, after the war between China and Japan, to mark the formation of a new Taiwanese republic; the original flag was sent to Japan following the subsequent Japanese invasion. This replica was made in Japan in 1909 for the new museum in Taipei.  Although only a copy of the original, as a tangible legacy of the short-lived republic the Tiger Flag is a cultural icon in Taiwan.
The National Taiwan Museum wished to display this highly significant artefact but it was in poor condition. The flag raised interesting questions: What was the significance of previous repairs? Was it originally blue as records suggested?  An expert in textile conservation from the University of Glasgow acted as a consultant to the investigation and conservation project, helping researchers to gain a better understanding of the flag’s history, and advising on conservation treatment so that the flag could be safely displayed.

Project Partner: National Taiwan Museum

Academic:

Frances Lennard Caroline Ness - PhD student


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Jo Mattli and his contribution to the British fashion and textile industry

Mattli has been largely forgotten in the histories of dress of the twentieth century even though he was a major player in the London couture scene from World War II until the 1960s. The Fashion Museum in Bath has an archive of Mattli press books and drawings, and a small number of garments but very little was known about the collection. The researcher and the museum worked together in feeling that these interesting, rich resources warranted further evaluation in the context of the history of post-war British couture. As part of the PhD research, the garments have been catalogued and a database of the press books has been created, allowing greater access to these resources. The research has uncovered many details of Mattli’s couture business and analysing these has helped to put his work into context. The research will do a great deal to revive his reputation.

Project Partner:

Fashion Museum, Bath

Academic:

Frances Lennard


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Tapestry in the Round

A series of research workshops is bringing together the Scottish university and cultural heritage sectors in partnership around the topic of new directions in tapestry research. The importance of tapestry in domestic, stately and ecclesiastical interiors before the eighteenth century is well known, but all too often from the perspectives of single disciplines. ‘Tapestry in the Round’ exploits the happy coincidence of three developments in Scotland to establish a truly interdisciplinary network into textile history and conservation: the creation of the Centre for Textile Conservation and Technical Art History (Glasgow University); a major new catalogue project at the Burrell Collection (Glasgow Museums); and growing research into the History of Material Culture in the School of Humanities at the University of Glasgow. The result will be greater public and scholarly understanding of some of Scotland’s most precious public treasures, but also a durable collaboration between two key elements of the public sector for future investigation of textile history and conservation.

Academic:

Frances Lennard

Project Partner:

Glasgow Museums, Glasgow Life


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The History of Sanquhar Knit

Academics are collaborating with Fi Scott of MakeWorks, an independent design-led organisation that facilitates, celebrates and debates making, manufacture and craft in Scotland. The research into the history of Sanquhar knit designs (a distinctive two-coloured design) is supported by the Royal Society of Edinburgh and is the outcome of a series of workshops that brought together business, academics and knitters to discuss the relationship between the history of Scottish knitting traditions with present day developments in hand knitted textiles. Academics have interviewed knitters, collected patterns and artefacts and recorded artefacts for a digital archive. The project will culminate in a report, a digital collection and a public event.

Project Partner: Makeworks

Academics:

Prof Lynn Abrams, Dr Marina Moskowitz


 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The History of Hand-Knitted Lace in Shetland

In 2010, academics from the College of Arts were awarded an AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award in collaboration with Carol Christiansen of Shetland Museum and Archives for a doctoral research project on the history of hand knitted lace in Shetland.
The research is being undertaken by Roslyn Chapman and has involved collaborations with collections and heritage organisations across Shetland and with community groups. The outcomes will include enhanced interpretation of the largest collection of knitted lace in the UK in Shetland museum and knowledge transfer between academics and knitters.

Project Partner:

Shetland Museum and Archives

Academics:

Prof Lynn Abrams, Dr Marina Moskowitz

 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Hand Knitted Textiles and the Economies of Craft in Scotland

Academic historians have been working to explore the place and significance of hand-knitted textiles to Scotland’s economy and culture: past, present, and future. This has been done in collaboration with external organisations such as the Shetland Museum and Archives, the Moray Firth Partnership (Gansey Project), and Jamieson & Smith, as well as individual designers, producers and artists.
With funding from the Royal Society of Edinburgh, academics ran three workshops (on wool, knitting and design) and a public study day at the Lighthouse in Glasgow, which drew together academics, practitioners, designers, makers, industry, creatives, heritage professionals and amateur knitters to talk about how Scottish hand knit traditions have been and are being adapted, produced and marketed in the modern age.

Project Partner: Shetland Museum and Archives

Academics:

Prof Lynn Abrams, Dr Marina Moskowitz



To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Scottish History in Schools Website

Launched in 2012, the History in Schools website has been developed by the College of Arts in consultation with teaching colleagues in the Scottish Association of Teachers of History and Education Scotland.
It aims to disseminate Glasgow’s history research to teachers and pupils in Scotland’s schools by providing open access papers, teaching resources, podcasts and website links. These can be used by teachers in planning lessons or by pupils in researching essays. The website is organised by topic, with general education topics for S1-S3 and SQA Higher certificate topics for S4-S6.
The team intends to add more themes, including Advanced Higher subjects, and to develop a more interactive website for sharing research, teaching files and ideas.

Project Partners:
Education Scotland, Scottish Qualifications Authority, Scottish Association of Teachers of History

Academic:
Dr Karin Bowie


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Paradox of Medieval Scotland

A group of academics in the College of Arts are paving the way to develop resources to support the teaching of Scottish History in the classroom.
A key part of this has been the creation of a vast database of 12th and 13th century Scotland: People of Medieval Scotland (POMS). The database has been designed for school children and their teachers, as well as academics, to use.
The database offers a new experience of engaging with the past, allowing thousands of individuals, and hundreds of places, to take centre stage.
Professor Broun adds: “From Dingwall to Dumfries, schools can investigate history that can be contextualized. Scottish History should look different in different parts of Scotland.”

Project Partners:
Education Scotland, Scottish Qualifications Authority, Scottish Association of Teachers of History

Academic:
Prof Dauvit Broun


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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