Heritage

Heritage

"Heritage is not static. It is not dead and gone. It is our dynamic interactions with our past in the present. Heritage is the ways in which the past shapes us, our relationships with each other and with the world around us." - Dr Chris Dalglish

Heritage in the College of Arts

In the College of Arts we understand heritage to be the living past.  It is a tangible inheritance of archaeological sites, historic buildings, the artefacts in our museum collections, the documents in our archives, works of art and of literature; and it is our inherited beliefs, values, knowledge, languages, traditions and practices. 

Heritage is not static.  It is not dead and gone.  It is our dynamic interactions with our past in the present.  Heritage is the ways in which the past shapes us, our relationships with each other and with the world around us.  It is embedded in our culture, society, economy and environment.  Heritage is a positive legacy of resources and opportunities.  It is also the problems and challenges which have come down to us from the past and which we must tackle in moving into the future. 

In the College of Arts, we place people and human values at the centre of heritage research, education and knowledge exchange.  Across a wide range of disciplines, we are progressing understanding of the role of heritage in society today.  We are providing the next generation of heritage researchers, heritage professionals, heritage advocates and heritage communities[i] with the necessary knowledge, insights and skills.  We are working with partners in the public, private and social sectors, and in society at large, more fully to realise the contribution which heritage can make to society.

In Scotland and internationally, we work closely with others to support the transmission of heritage to future generations and to mobilise heritage in addressing the challenges facing society today.  We do this by collaborating to create the capacity, the information and concepts, the infrastructure, practices and tools, and the critical thinking and ethical frameworks needed to realise the value of heritage for society.

[i] See the Council of Europe Framework Convention on the Value of Cultural Heritage for Society

Above image: A participatory heritage map, created during the development of the Vjosa/Aoos Ecomuseum in Greece and Albania (www.ecomuseum.eu).  The Ecomuseum links heritage – as defined through a collaborative, participatory process involving community members, academics, NGOs and local authorities – to the sustainable development of the landscape and the livelihoods of the local population.  Aphrodite Sorotou, who coordinated the project for Greek-based NGO Med-INA, has recently joined Glasgow University and the University is now working with partners to develop future collaborative projects in the area.

 

Text by Dr Chris Dalglish – Film and Broadcasting Knowledge Exchange Theme Lead, Lecturer (Theatre, Film and Television Studies)


View Chris's video on Heritage in the College of Arts

To learn more about Heritage or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

 

 

 


Heritage KE Case Studies

Heritage KE Case Studies

Collaboration on Clarifying the Costs of Curation (4C)

The 4C project brings together 13 agencies in 7 different countries so that organizations can approach their investment in the curation and preservation of their cultural heritage and scientific information with greater certainty and with greater clarity about what they will receive in return.
The 4c project is co-funded by European Union under the 7th Framework programme for research and technological development and demonstration activities and will run from February 1, 2013 until January 31, 2015. Partners include HATII, Digital Preservation Coalition, Danish National Archives, German National Library, Institute for System and Computer Engineering in Portugal, Keep Solutions, and the National Library of Estonia.

Website:

www.4cproject.eu/


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Centre for Battlefield Archaeology – Policy and Consultancy

The Centre for Battlefield Archaeology has been working on the Inventory of Scottish Battlefields since 2006.  Working closely with Historic Scotland, the Centre created the site entries, the site boundaries and provided the information that was used to write the battlefields section of the Scottish Historic Environment Policy.  
The Centre has provided training sessions on battlefields with Historic Scotland for planners in local councils, for Historic Scotland casework staff and for heritage organisations.  The Centre provided consultancy on the development of management plans for battlefields, and has produced the guidance on minimum standards for mitigation work on battlefields within the Inventory.  The Centre is available for consultation on approaches to battlefields and has undertaken a series of community projects on battlefields across Scotland; the Centre is currently running the largest investigation of the Battle of Bannockburn ever to have taken place.

Partner: Historic Scotland

Academic:

Dr Iain Banks, Dr Tony Pollard


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Closing the Digital Curation Gap (CDCG)

Over the past decade, a significant gap has emerged between the research and development in digital curation, on the one hand, and professional practices of archivists, librarians, and museum curators, on the other. There are now many viable applications, models, strategies, and standards for long-term care of digital objects. However, many institutions with a mandate to do this work are either unaware of the options or currently unable to evaluate and implement them.

There is a need to test, refine and diffuse existing innovations into professional practice. HATII is a core partner in the CDCG project which created guidance and tools to support the cultural heritage repository community, and especially staff in small to medium-sized institutions, to undertake more confidently curation related activity. Partners included the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), Library of Congress, and the Strategic Content Alliance (SCA).

Website:

http://digitalcurationexchange.org/


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Conservation of Textile Fragments Dating from the 7th-9th Century

The aim of the project is to conserve textile fragments dating from the 7th-9th century excavated from two Nubian cemetery sites in Kulubnarti, Sudan. The project was initiated by Julie Anderson, Curator in the Department of Ancient Egypt and the Sudan, and Anna Harrison.


The principal opportunity is to establish a mutually beneficial collaboration which has the potential to develop and grow into the long term. As well as gaining crucial theoretical and practical experience of archaeological textiles, students have the opportunity to gain an insight into the motivations and working methods of a large institution. For the British Museum, this is a great opportunity to have some fascinating textiles conserved which otherwise might remain untreated; to add to existing knowledge about their collection; to gain experience in teaching and the organisation of such a project; and to maintain valuable links with colleagues at the University of Glasgow.

Partner:

The British Museum

Academic:

Sarah Foskett


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Digital Curator Vocational Education Europe Project

DigCurV is a project funded by the European Commission’s Leonardo da Vinci programme designed to establish a curriculum framework for vocational training in digital curation. Following on in HATII’s strong suite of digital curation projects, DigCurV has addressed the availability of vocational training for digital curators in the library, archive, museum and cultural heritage sectors needed to develop new skills that are essential for the long-term management of digital collections. Building on research identifying the key skills and competences required of digital curators, HATII has established a curriculum framework from which training programmes can be developed in future. We are in the process of disseminating the framework to policy and decision makers to raise awareness of the curriculum and promote its exploitation. Our partners include Vilniaus Universiteto Biblioteka (Lithuania), Fondazione Rinascimento Digitale (Italy), Nestor Qualification Consortium (Goettingen State and University Library, Germany) as well as Institute of Museum and Library Services (USA) and Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC).

Website:

www.digcurv.gla.ac.uk/


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Georgian Glasgow

Staff and postgraduate students in the School of Humanities are working closely with Glasgow Museums in the development of the ‘Georgian Glasgow’ exhibition, which will run in the Kelvingrove Museum between 2nd April and 17th August 2014.
Part of the exhibit explores the connections between Glasgow and New World colonial slavery, and School staff are developing a symposium in which presentations will develop from particular artefacts in the exhibit. These presentations, along with digital images of the artefacts, will be mounted on a website for use by school learners and students around the world.

Partner:

Glasgow Museums, Glasgow Life

Academic:

Prof Simon Newman


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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TheGlasgowStory

Ever wondered who lived in your house or street before the First World War? Or how the city was laid out before a multitude of urban regeneration projects and motorway-building schemes altered the face of the city, sweeping away streets and entire neighbourhoods in the process? TheGlasgowStory tells the story of Glasgow in words and pictures. It includes tales from some of Scotland’s best writers and is illustrated with thousands of images from the collections of the city’s world-famous libraries, museums and universities.  Partners in this ground-breaking initiative led by HATII included Glasgow Museums and Art Galleries, Mitchell Library, Scottish Screen Archive, Scottish Enterprise Glasgow, Strathclyde University and Glasgow Caledonian University.

Website:

http://www.theglasgowstory.com/index.php


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Historic Govan

Between 2007 and 2009, Professor Driscoll was commissioned by Historic Scotland to evaluate the archaeological and architectural heritage of Govan as part of the government’s Burgh Survey programme. This study produced the first comprehensive mapping of Govan’s physical cultural heritage assets. The Geographical Information System (GIS) built for the study was adopted by the West of Scotland Archaeology Service (2008) for use in evaluating planning applications. The narrative account, resource evaluation and recommendations were published as Historic Govan (2009) accompanied by a suite of historical maps. Although part of a series aimed primarily at planners, Driscoll and his team varied the format to make it more attractive to a popular audience.

Driscoll subsequently contributed to the Govan Workspace Options Appraisal (2008-10), which sought to identify a sustainable future for the church and its collection of medieval sculpture. The proposal was to transform the church into a museum/cultural resource centre capable of providing impetus to the regeneration of Govan. The first stage aimed at improved access and interpretative resources to make the church site attractive to tourists; the second stage included a major refurbishment to combine commercial rental space (in the basement of the old church) with state-of-the-art displays in the main body of the church.

Funding for the first phase (£120,000) was secured in 2011 from the Heritage Lottery Fund, Historic Scotland, the Church of Scotland and other sponsors.  Professor Driscoll has applied his expertise to interpret the history and meaning behind the sculptures and was a primary contributor to the new display, known as the Govan Stones project (www.thegovanstones.org.uk),  installed and launched in 2012.

Website:

www.thegovanstones.org.uk

Academic:

Prof Stephen Driscoll

 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Mapping the Practice and Profession of Sculpture in Britain and Ireland 1851-1951

The project delivers the results of the first comprehensive study of sculpture between the Great Exhibition of 1851, and the Festival of Britain in 1951. This was the first authoritative study of sculptors, related businesses and trades investigated in the context of creative collaborations, art infrastructures, professional networks and cultural geographies.
The HATII-developed database is the main outcome of the research and contains over 50,000 records about sculptural practice, connected by means over 380,000 relationships. In collaboration with History of Art at the University of Glasgow, external partners on Mapping Sculpture included the Victoria & Albert Museum and the Henry Moore Institute.

Website:

http://sculpture.gla.ac.uk/

 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Mobilising Mapping

The Mapping Sculpture database contains over 50,000 records relating to sculptural practice between 1851 and 1951. This includes information on around: 3,500 sculptors; another 2,750 related practitioners; 10,000 trades connected to sculpture; 15,000 objects; 125 art schools; 120 art societies; 1,300 exhibitions; 700 other events such as sculpture courses, lectures and discussions; some 16,000 addresses for artists and businesses; and about 350,000 relationships connecting these different types of record together.
Providing a new dimension to the original Mapping Sculpture project, Mobilising Mapping saw the development of innovative personalisation features, social media integration, and a novel web interface optimised for mobile phone access.
The launch of the mobile interface took place at the Mapping Sculpture conference held at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London in 2011 and was promoted by means of in exhibitions and displays in the project’s partner institutions: ‘Mapping Sculpture: Meetings – Materials – Makers’ (V&A, November 2010-May 2011) and ‘Mapping the Practices of Sculpture’ (Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, October 2010-October 2011).

Website:

http://sculpture.gla.ac.uk/

 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Awakening Annandale's Past

A unique collaborative project involving experts from across the University of Glasgow’s College of Arts is reviving one of Scotland’s most iconic lost whisky distilleries.

The Annandale Distillery (pictured above) in Dumfriesshire has been dormant since 1919. However, thanks to three projects led by University academics, all this is changing; whisky will be produced in Annan once more.

For new distillery owner, Prof David Thomson, the resurrection is far more than a business investment. Having grown up in the area, the distillery symbolizes a re-development of a place that he holds a great deal of passion for. To help him achieve this, teams from the College of Arts have been working with David to restore, not only the buildings, but also the lost history and culture of the Annandale Distillery.

“Developing Annandale back to a working distillery will bring investment, tourism and jobs into to the area,” says David. “However, also key for me is the opportunity to reconnect the distillery with the history of Annandale so that it also holds meaning for the locals of Annan.”

Since David took over the site in 2007 the renovation project has been a long and difficult journey, and a journey that input from the College of Arts has certainly made easier and more rewarding.

Initially, in the absence of any detailed paperwork and drawings, the layout and uses of the various outbuildings on-site was difficult to ascertain. “As it was intended that the distillery was to become a tourism destination and point of historical significance, it was important to account correctly for the buildings as they are now and as they might have been in the past,” said David.

To chart the physical history of the site, Dr John Atkinson and a team from Archaeology, in the School of Humanities, embarked on a three-month investigation, drawing up a detailed report tracing the evolution of the buildings. This report, facilitated by pump-priming funding via a First Step Award from the University of Glasgow’s Innovation Network, was used to inform the development decisions in advance of planning applications.

However, just as important for David was the chance to tell the story of the distillery through the ages. He set to work alongside Prof Ted Cowan in Scottish History to build up a history of then area and ensure that the volumes of information pertaining to Annan were made available to the public. After much painstaking research an Innovation Voucher was facilitated via Interface so that the public visiting the Distillery could learn more about the history of the area.

Finally, a project with Prof John Corbett of the School of Critical Studies was established to provide information vital to the development of the distillery’s brand and marketing. Praising the work of everyone at the College of Arts and the vision of David in making this venture a success, Director of the Centre for Robert Burns Studies, Prof Gerry Carruthers (School of Critical Studies), said: “David and Annandale Distillery Ltd are an excellent example of how small developing companies can tap into the rich knowledge base available via the College of Arts”. 

Speaking about the collaboration, David said: “Parallel to my passion for an excellent Single Malt Whisky is my passion for Robert Burns. I’m looking forward to working closely with the Centre for Robert Burns Studies, to develop a cohesive and compelling brand for Annandale Distillery. On top of this I would like to record my appreciation of the College of Arts for their vital help to the development of the Annandale Distillery, I know that we will stay committed partners.”

 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The William Collins Archive

The partnership between HarperCollins and the University to preserve the William Collins, Sons & Co Ltd Archive allows HarperCollins to draw on its rich heritage to support future growth and protect its assets. At the same time, researchers are provided with access to these unique resources which document the development of this publishing giant.
HarperCollins traces its British roots to 1819, when William Collins established his printing and publishing business in Glasgow. From its beginnings publishing religious texts and reference works, the company developed the market for popular editions of classical literature before moving into the publication of original fiction. Collins established itself as a key figure in the international market publishing authors including Agatha Christie, JRR Tolkien, CS Lewis and Enid Blyton.

Partner:

HarperCollins

Group:

University of Glasgow Archive Services


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The Tenant Experience in Social Housing

East Kilbride was designated Scotland's first new town in 1947. Situated on a hilly site in the lower Clyde valley just 8 miles south of the city of Glasgow, it was originally planned as a self-contained town with a population of around 45,000. By 1960 the target population was increased to 70,000. Today East Kilbride is home to 74,012 people.

Homes in East Kilbride were marketed by the Development Corporation as 'modern' and, in comparison with the older housing stock in Scottish towns and cities, these new dwellings were far better equipped. A 1952 article in the Hamilton Advertiser described the new flats as 'a housewives' dream' with built-in wardrobes, pram stores in the entrance hall, a heated towel rail and a kitchenette complete with a gas boiler and built-in cabinets.

It was the belief of the town planners that high quality 'modern' housing in a planned environment would promote a sense of health and wellbeing among residents, improving their quality of life.

As one of the current providers of social housing in the town, East Kilbride & District Housing Association (EKDHA) owns and manages 512 houses available for social rent. Says Mairi Brown Director of EKDHA:

“Like all housing associations, EKDHA is legally obliged to carry out consultations with tenants. It is also committed to providing maximum opportunity and support to tenants and seeks to shape future policy and practice. However, as a small housing association, EKDHA has limited resources for research, therefore engaging with a research intensive institution such as the University of Glasgow seemed the logical step.” 

Using a First Step Award to finance the project, EKDHA engaged directly with Prof Lynn Abrams (History, School of Humanities) to conduct research on their behalf.

“The project aimed to explore the degree to which East Kilbride has met people's expectations and aspirations in terms of housing, local environment and quality of life,” explained Prof Abrams (pictured above).

“In contrast to surveys which assess satisfaction at a particular moment, we aimed to investigate how people's relationships with their homes have altered over their life course. This could be in response to the shifting needs of the family structure, but also to income, age or reaction to the changing character and infrastructure of East Kilbride since 1947.”

The research, which was conducted via a series of oral history interviews with long-term residents, revealed high levels of satisfaction with new town housing and the new town way of life, with respondents commenting on the modern style of homes, the sense of community and the positive sense of wellbeing experienced in the town’s early years.

“The outputs from this project delivered far more than we would have been able to undertake independently of the College of Arts. The process of engaging with the College was easier than we anticipated and, now that the relationship with Lynn and her group has been established, we would not hesitate to call on their knowledge base again,”  said Ms Brown.

 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Landscape Governance and Development

The College of Arts has an established track record in the fields of landscape policy and practice. With partners in Scotland and across Europe, the College engages with the landscape’s past in order to realise the environmental, social, cultural and economic benefits for the future.
The College’s MSc in Landscape: Integrated Research & Practice works with industry to train the next generation of landscape researchers and practitioners. PhD research has also been developed in collaboration
with external partners to be both policy- and practice-orientated.
Many cross-discipline and cross-sector conferences and workshops help to set the agenda for innovative policy- and practice-orientated research.
Specific projects aim to develop new landscape governance and development philosophies and practices.

Partners:
Recent and current collaborators include Northlight Heritage, the Mediterranean Institute for Nature and Anthropos, ProGenus Environmental Ltd., the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS) and the Landscape Research Group.

Academics:

Dr Chris Dalglish, Dr Kenny Brophy


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Name Studies at the University of Glasgow

The Scottish Toponymy in Transition (STIT) project aims to research and publish three volumes of the place-names of Kinross-shire, Clackmannanshire and Menteith, in addition to beginning research on the place-names of Berwickshire and Ayrshire.
The project team from the College of Arts is actively engaging the public with events such as place-name walks, talks to local history societies and putting on exhibitions. The project is also working with Education Scotland to produce place-name resources for the school curriculum.
The College has particular expertise in the study of names (Onomastics) with a lively academic community researching place- and personal names throughout Scotland. Potential areas for future work include developing place-name apps and walks for the tourist industry.

Partner:

Education Scotland

Academics:

Prof Carole Hough, Prof Thomas Clancy, Dr Simon Taylor


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Locating Burns in Scottish and Global Culture

Academics in the Centre for Robert Burns Studies (CRBS), College of Arts, have worked in collaboration with the National Library of Scotland, National Galleries Scotland, National Museums Scotland, Glasgow Life, Dumfries and Galloway Museums and East and South Ayrshire Museums as part of Burns Scotland, created in 2008.

This partnership manages and promotes access to the c.36,000 items relating to Burns in Scottish public collections. They have worked on several exhibitions for Burns Scotland in recent years including Zig Zag: The Paths of Robert Burns and Robert Burns Beyond Text, which appeared across Scotland. The CRBS also worked with the BBC to create a permanent online archive of Burns’ works, including performances by many Scottish celebrities.

Project Parner:
Burns Scotland


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Place-name research supports local investment

Academics in the College of Arts have helped local initiatives in Scotland to access over £4.5 million worth of Heritage Lottery funding. Working with Discover Bute and the Living Lomonds Landscape Partnership (LLLP), academics from the Scottish place-name projects advised how place-name research could form part of their Heritage Landscape Parternship (HLP) bids. Academics provided a vision of how the communities could be involved in the projects and how the projects could develop.

With Discover Bute, their work resulted in data collection by local residents, which required training workshops from the academics on the phonetic alphabet and recording pronunciation and spatial data, as well as ethical concerns. These projects give people a sense of ownership of their own heritage which is empowering for local communities.

Project Partner: 
Discover Bute, Living Lomonds Landscape Partnership


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Sculptured stones: Transforming monument management policy

Working with Historic Scotland, an academic in the College of Arts has transformed the management of 1,800 monuments in Scotland and vastly improved the experience of 50,000 visitors to Iona Abbey every year. Katherine Forsyth helped to produce Historic Scotland’s ‘Carved Stones: Scottish Executive Policy and Guidance’, which governs their approach to the conservation, maintenance and display of all carved stones in Scotland.

Following Forsyth’s approach, Historic Scotland redesigned Iona Museum in 2013 to focus on her interpretations of individual monuments. The new display brings out the over-arching significance of the site as a whole, which Forsyth discovered was originally intended to mirror the layout of other holy sites. Forsyth’s approach was also used in the redisplay of Whithorn Priory (2005) and St Vigeans Museum (2009).

Project Partner:
Historic Scotland

Academic:
Dr Katherine Forsyth


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Restoration of Stirling Castle Palace

An academic in the College of Arts has helped to transform Stirling Castle Palace, making it the UK’s top heritage attraction in a 2012 Which? survey. Visitor numbers went up by 17% the year after it opened with a rise of over £1million in revenue for Stirling Castle. The research of Sally Rush informed how the material culture of the James V period should be displayed, allowing Historic Scotland to redecorate six apartments of the royal palace in the original style of c.1538.

The most impressive aspect of the renovation is the exhibition of the Stirling Heads, once part of the Palace ceilings. Thanks to Rush’s identification and interpretation of each individual head, they are now displayed in a purpose-built gallery and the stories they tell enhance the visitor experience.

Project Partner: 
Historic Scotland

Academic: 
Dr Sally Rush


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Enhancing public engagement with the avant-garde

As a special advisor to The Surreal House (2010) exhibition at the Barbican in London, Ramona Fotiade, an academic in the College of Arts, played a crucial role in exposing the link between Surrealist film and architecture. As the UK’s leading expert on Surrealist cinema, Fotiade was one of four international special advisors who were asked to contribute both to the exhibition and the catalogue, for which she wrote four essays.

Over 42,500 visitors attended the exhibition and particularly appreciated Fotiade’s selection of films, which formed an integral part of the exhibition.

Project Partner:
Barbican

Academic:
Dr Ramona Fotiade


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Remembering Women in Scotland

Academics in the Centre for Gender History, part of the College of Arts, have worked closely with Glasgow Women’s Library to deliver workshops and other public events. They worked together on the Women of Scotland project with Women’s History Scotland and Girl Guiding Scotland, using a Lottery Awards for All grant, and as a result they have helped to map memorials of over 300 women in Scotland.

Girl Guides participated in the ‘Big Name Hunt’ to find memorials in their local area and gain their ‘Heritage Badge’. Where memorials couldn’t be found, one Girl Guide troop campaigned for a memorial to be established. The project is now being rolled out nationwide through the Glasgow Women’s Library’s outreach programme.

Project Partner:

Glasgow Women's Library, Girl Guiding Scotland


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Creating a global resource for provenance research

Professor Nick Pearce’s current project builds on the study of provenance (the history of ownership of a work of art), an area of research which has come into focus in recent years. Working with the Freer-Sackler Gallery, he will help to develop a fully searchable database of Asian art confiscated, transferred, looted or destroyed before and during World War II under the Nazi regime.

Database entries will be linked to the objects in the Freer-Sackler online collections that were either acquired through or at some point owned by a given collector or dealer. Additional information will also assist in recreating the chain of object ownership. A bibliography and the location of archival records also will be added to the site.

The web resource will also link to the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art (AAA), where there are ongoing efforts to make resources accessible online. With the addition of the images, and the possibility of linking with still other institutions in the UK and Europe, this site can become a powerful search engine for provenance research and a global resource for research in Asian art provenance.

Project Partner: 
Freer-Sackler

Academic: 
Professor Nick Pearce

Project Website: 
www.asia.si.edu/collections/ww2provenance.asp


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Communicating the First World War

Glasgow University’s Great War is a research project based in the University Archives and run by Dr Tony Pollard (History / Archaeology). The project has worked closely with non-HEI partners to explore the experiences of the university community during WWI. For example, the project partnered with the City of Glasgow’s wider WWI project, participating in the 4 August 2014 Commonwealth centenary commemorations and contributing research to the city’s spectacular 11 November light display in George Square. The project also participates in national WWI initiatives organised by The National Archives and the Imperial War Museum.

Furthermore, the Great War Project engages with the wider community by offering students hands-on research training through the University’s Club 21 internship scheme. Student placements use primary sources in the University Archives to explore a range of themes and then conduct further research by working with external organisations such as Friends of Glasgow Necropolis, at the Royal Highland Fusiliers Museum and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow.

Project Partner: 
National Archives, Imperial War Museum, Friends of Glasgow Necropolis, Royal Highland Fusiliers Museum, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow.

Academic: 
Dr Tony Pollard

Project Website: 
http://www.gla.ac.uk/greatwar / @GlasgowUniWW1


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Raising awareness of Irish-Scottish connections

Professor Willy Maley, through his work in Irish-Scottish studies ­ in theatre, journalism, and popular culture, as well as critical writing ­has longstanding links with the Irish community in Scotland as a public speaker and community activist. Most recently, he presented a paper on Irish and Scottish Catholic responses to the Spanish Civil War at an event organised by the Irish Heritage Foundation in December 2014, subsequently published in the January edition of the community newspaper The Irish Voice.

Through his contacts with the Irish Heritage Foundation Maley was invited to be part of the 1916 Rising Centenary Committee (Scotland), together with Kirsty Lusk, a PhD student whom he is supervising, who is working on Parnell to Partition: Irish-Scottish Connections, 1880-1921. The committee aims to organise a series of public events marking the centenary of the Easter Rising, raising awareness of the Scottish context and its implications for Ireland and the wider world through seminars and discussions.

Maley and Lusk are also editing a special issue of the journal Irish Studies Review for 2016 entitled Commemorating Connolly: Contexts, Comparisons and Celtic Connections, which will bring together creative and critical responses to the Rising, with contributions by academic and activists. This will place James Connolly in his Scottish and Irish contexts, including his reception among Gaelic readers and writers, and examine the crucial role of women in the events of 1916, including Coatbridge-born Margaret Skinnider.

Project Partner: 
Irish Heritage Foundation, Irish Studies Review.

Academic: 
Professor Willy Maley


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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<<< Review Related Case Studies

<<< Sign-up for Reach the College of Arts Industry Engagement Newsletter