Archives, Collections and Digital Humanities

Archives, Collections and Digital Humanities

Archives, Collections and Digital Humanities KE Case Studies

Archives, Collections and Digital Humanities KE Case Studies

Situating Barkcloth in Time and Place

Dr Frances Lennard, a senior lecturer in Textile Conservation, is leading a team on an AHRC funded project to study Pacific barkcloth artefacts. They are investigating the properties and heritage of the Pacific Barkcloth collection at the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow. Secondly, in collaboration with experts from Kew Gardens in London, they are also examining the barkcloth artefacts in the Economy Botany Collection at Kew. One of the aims is to situate the artefacts in time and place, as the majority were collected during the colonial era by Europeans who asked few questions about their origins. Cutting edge technology is being used to try and identify which plants were used. Another aim is to explore conservation possibilities so that the collections might be made accessible and even transportable, so that Hawaiian scholars can study them as part of their own cultural heritage. 

Academics: Dr Frances Lennard, Ms Misa Tamura, Dr Margaret Smith, Dr Andrew Mills 

Partners: AHRC, Kew Gardens, Hunterian Museum, The Smithsonian Museum of Natural History

To find out more about this project or to discuss developing your own partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development Manager by phone (0141 330 3885) or by email. 


Artist Rooms

A series of research workshops is bringing together the Scottish university and cultural heritage sectors in partnership around the topic of new directions in tapestry research. The importance of tapestry in domestic, stately and ecclesiastical interiors before the eighteenth century is well known, but all too often from the perspectives of single disciplines. ‘Tapestry in the Round’ exploits the happy coincidence of three developments in Scotland to establish a truly interdisciplinary network into textile history and conservation: the creation of the Centre for Textile Conservation and Technical Art History (Glasgow University); a major new catalogue project at the Burrell Collection (Glasgow Museums); and growing research into the History of Material Culture in the School of Humanities at the University of Glasgow. The result will be greater public and scholarly understanding of some of Scotland’s most precious public treasures, but also a durable collaboration between two key elements of the public sector for future investigation of textile history and conservation.

Academic:

Frances Lennard

Project Partner:

Glasgow Museums, Glasgow Life


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Chinese Costume and Textile Dyes of the Ming and Qing Dynasty

Colour was a significant status symbol in the textiles of the Chinese imperial courts of the Ming and Qing dynasties, especially yellows and reds. Surviving examples of historical textiles from these dynasties in collections, including those of Glasgow Museums, raise questions surrounding their date, provenance and significance as well as the sensitivity of the dyes to light with implications for access and display. These can be answered by a better understanding of the historical reasons for the colour choices, the source of the dyes and the dyeing methods.

By combining complementary strengths of History of Art expertise in Chinese art history, scientific dye analysis and conservation science with curatorial expertise in East Asian collections at Glasgow Museums and twelve other museums  including V&A Museum, National Museums Scotland, Shanghai Museum, Chester Beatty Library, Shaanxi Institute of Archaeology as well as two private collections, this collaborative project takes a truly interdisciplinary approach  to trade, cultural influence and cultural exchange by drawing upon archival research, scientific analysis and reconstruction of historical practices. 

Project Partner: Glasgow Museums, Glasgow Life, Textile Conservation Foundation

Academics: Jing Han


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Metallic Threads of Famen Temple silk (618-874), Tang Dynasty, China

The Famen Temple in Shaanxi province was the royal temple during the Sui Dynasty (581-618) and Tang Dynasty (618-907). Treasures found in the excavation of the underground crypt in 1987 include fragile silk textiles dating from the Tang Dynasty.
In this project, metallic threads from this early period of Chinese Famen silk have been scientifically investigated in terms of their material, technology and structure.
This analysis is combined with an investigation of Chinese traditional manufacturing techniques of producing gold and silver wrapped threads, and compared with techniques still practiced today. Further research into technical categories and principles of metallic thread development is also underway. Experimental work on the ideal conditions necessary for the preservation of metal threads is ongoing.


Project Partner: Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Archaeology, China

Academic:

Prof Nick Pearce

College of Arts contact:

arts-ke@glasgow.ac.uk

 


ReCREATE: rediscovering the experimental culture of 19th century Scottish textile manufacture

Equipment, materials and documents from the design and manufacture of textiles in nineteenth century Scotland are being increasingly reconnected through historical reconstructions and re-enactments to enrich museum and archive exhibitions and highlight collection significance for preservation. Replicating and using the past tools of the trade from the Scottish designer, weaver, dyer and printer means rediscovering unrecorded tacit knowledge and experimental cultures not only within each specialist practice, but also across and between them within the wider context of an industrialising world. 

ReCREATE unites a core group of academics and practitioners in arts, humanities, sciences and engineering from Scottish HEIs, museums, archives and heritage trusts with researchers across Europe to share interdisciplinary knowledge in the designing and making of decorative textiles in nineteenth century Scotland. By interrogating and challenging perceptions and conceptions about communities and individuals in past cultures of information exchange and experimentation, new research and collaborative projects are taking shape for textile heritage reconstructions in interpretation and conservation. 

ReCREATE continues the innovative partnership between History of Art and National Museums Scotland (NMS), initiated by the knowledge exchange network ReINVENT, to enhance the display and interpretation of Scotland’s textile heritage, including the inspirational new £12 million galleries for NMS’ Scottish Science and Technology and European Art and Design collections.

Partner:
National Museums Scotland

Academic:
Dr Anita Quye


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The Crutchley Archive: assessing historical significance & the need for preservation

Textile dye houses of old were secretive, protected places where dyers learnt from each other through practice and in written instructions from masters of their trade. Thanks to descendants of the Crutchley family who owned and ran a dye company on the south bank of the River Thames 300 years ago, rare records from this era have survived. The collection includes sumptuous pattern books with samples of wool ‘topped’ with red from madder and cochineal dyes, dyeing recipes and instructions, and customer names and amounts of credit.

The Crutchley Archive was donated to Southwark Local History Library and Archive in 2011, and its historical significance and need for preservation was assessed in 2014 by the University of Glasgow’s Centre for Textile Conservation and Technical Art History. This established a collaborative partnership between the Southwark archivists and the University’s experts in textile history, dye analysis and textile conservation to understand and interpret the archive’s contents, and to make the archive more accessible while preserving the exquisite colours of dyed textiles protected from light for centuries.

The Crutchley archive is central in a multi-partner interdisciplinary project being developed by the University with researchers in The National Archive, University of Exeter, CNRS (France) and V&A to place its historical context with related material in other European collections.

Partner:
Southwark Local History Library and Archive, London

Academic:
Dr Anita Quye


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The Hunterian Associates Programme

At the core of the Hunterian Associates Programme is the notion that the cutting-edge research of our postgraduate researchers will connect in exciting and unexpected ways with the Hunterian’s extensive collections and create new opportunities for public engagement.
In 2012, HAP’s first year, eight postgraduate research students were successful and the subject matter of the resulting projects was wide-ranging: Japanese influenced art; the poem prints of Ian Hamilton Finlay; Paisley shawls; and Hunter’s book collection. These projects attracted new audiences through gallery talks, lunchtime talks, and creative writing events, as well as the addition of new resources to the website.
In 2013, the College welcomes 13 more Associates whose projects span a fascinating variety of interests.

Project Partners:
Hunterian Museum & Gallery

Academic:
Ruth Fletcher


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Digital Repository Audit Method Based on Risk Assessment

Developed by HATII in partnership with the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) and Digital Preservation Europe (DPE) the Digital Repository Audit Method Based on Risk Assessment (DRAMBORA) methodology and toolkit was released in 2008. This toolkit is intended to facilitate internal audit by providing repository administrators with a means to assess their capabilities, identify their weaknesses, and recognise their strengths. Digital repositories are still in their infancy and this model is designed to be responsive to the rapidly developing landscape. A number of international partners were involved in piloting DRAMBORA including the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC), CERN the European Organization for Nuclear Research, the National Library of New Zealand, National Library of Sweden and National Library of France.

Website: www.repositoryaudit.eu/
 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Design’s Digital Curation for Architecture

An AHRC funded project, Design’s Digital Curation for Architecture (DEDICATE) investigates, defines and tests policies, requirements and procedures to build a common sustainable framework for the curation of Built Environment related data.
In the DEDICATE project we collaborate with a select group of Scottish project partners from the communities of the main actors in the management and production of Built Environment, that is Architecture practices, Engineering consultancies and Building Control Authorities.
Recent national and international regulations enforcing the digital documentation of public works in BIM formats and the rising needs for authoritative and legal digital data management for the building elements manufacturing are going to be especially addressed by the researched framework. DEDICATE will finish at the end of August 2013.  Design’s Digital Curation for Architecture (DEDICATE)

Website: http://architecturedigitalcuration.blogspot.co.uk

Academics: Dr Ruggero Lancia, Dr Ian Anderson


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Data Management Skills Support Initiative

Training providers need tools to help them assess and evaluate the information literacy courses and resources they are producing. Students need to be able to identify the right information literacy course for their needs at the right time. Students and training providers looking to reuse course materials need easier ways to find and compare suitable courses and resources. To these ends, the JISC-funded project will test the RIDLs criteria for good practice as a means of self-assessing, describing and evaluating information literacy training; test Vitae’s Researcher Development Framework (RDF) Information Literacy lens as a benchmarking tool for learning outcomes; and develop an improved classification scheme and a Jorum ‘window’ into information literacy training materials using Jorum Powered.

Website: www.dcc.ac.uk/training/damssi-abc

Project Partners:

HATII Vitae, Research Information Network, Mimas



To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Digital Curation Centre

Active since 2004, the JISC-funded Digital Curation Centre (DCC) provides a world-leading centre of expertise in digital curation with a focus on building capacity, capability and skills for research data management. The DCC is comprised of a partnership between HATII at the University of Glasgow, the University of Edinburgh and the University of Bath. DCC works in partnership with many international organisations including the Research Data Alliance, the Digital Preservation Coalition, the Australian National Data Service, the Consortia Advancing Standards in Research Administration Information (CASRAI), the Coalition for Networked Information, Research Councils UK, the Library and Information Association of South Africa (LIASA) and CODATA.

Website: www.dcc.ac.uk


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Digital Design Curation

The Digital Design Curation (DIDECU) project ran between 2010 and 2011, was funded by the Scottish Government through a First Step Award, a grant of £5,000. This knowledge exchange project was aimed at transferring curatorial competences and procedures to an Architecture practice while evaluating both the feasibility and the adequacy in a medium sized commercial context of the audit tools and methodologies, policies and requirements established by the Digital Curation community.
This investigation resulted in an audit of the data held, the infrastructure implemented and the procedures adopted by the project partner, complemented by their correlated risk assessment, and in a complete preservation plan detailing policies, requirements and suggested procedures tailored to the project partners' procedural and technical context.

Academics:

Dr Ruggero Lancia, Dr Ian Anderson

External Partner:

Page/Park Architects



To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Preservation and Long-term Access through NETworked Services

HATII was a key partner in the EU-funded FP6 Planets project, which developed tools, approaches and courses to address the challenge of preserving access to digital cultural and scientific knowledge. The project involved 15 other partners from national libraries, archives, universities and technology companies throughout Europe, including IBM, The British Library, National Library of the Netherlands, Swiss Federal Archives and The Austrian Institute of Technology. HATII led the development of a testbed environment to evaluate tools and services as well as devising the Planets training programme, a successful series of events which raised awareness of digital preservation and the project’s solutions amongst memory institution staff from across Europe and beyond.

Website:

www.planets-project.eu/
 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Preparing Students for a Career in Translation

The technical part of the MSc in Translation Studies includes an introduction to computer assisted translation (CAT) software from SDL Trados. The company, currently the world leader in Translation Studies software, provides software and learning and teaching materials for students. The training prepares the students for employment in the fields of legal, medical, financial and manual translation.
Students take the online certification exams for SDL’s terminology and translation memory management software free of charge. These qualifications can really help a newly qualified translator to secure a wider variety of work.
Studying the technology has also provided interesting areas for research in Translation Studies as CAT tools are advancing at a fast rate.


External Partner:

SDL Trados

Academic:

Dr Georgina Collins



To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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TIMBUS

The Digital Preservation Coalition is a partner in a major European Research project investigating the development of Timeless Business Processes.  
The EU co-funded ‘TIMBUS’ project focuses on resilient business processes. It will make the execution context, within which data is processed, analysed, transformed and rendered,  accessible over long periods. Furthermore, continued accessibility is often considered as a set of activities carried out in the isolation of a single domain.
TIMBUS, however, considers the dependencies on third-party services, information and capabilities that will be necessary to validate digital information in a future usage context. It will deliver activities, processes and tools that ensure: continued access to services and software; and produce the context within which information can be accessed, properly rendered, validated and transformed into knowledge.

Website:

www.timbusproject.net/


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Linguists Assist English Teaching Technology

Expert linguists from the College of Arts helped launch a new instructional software programme to aid adult literacy and courses for non-native speakers of English.

Glasgow-based start-up company Micro-phonics Ltd developed a prototype of the programme using a First Step Award from the University of Glasgow. The next stage involved a partnership with Dr Jane Stuart-Smith (pictured) and Dr Rachel Smith from the School of Critical Studies, specialists in speech production, perception and regional and social accents, to test their product empirically and develop it for market.

‌The Micro-phonics Ltd software uses a combination of video, animation and images to blend individual elements of speech together to teach letter-sounds, handwriting and pronunciation.

The primary markets for the product are English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL), corporate, government or educational bodies. The non-profit sector will also use it for adult literacy and English language teaching programmes.

Colin Hamilton, founder and director of Micro-phonics Ltd, said: “Without the input from the College of Arts we would have found it very difficult to develop and test our product; Jane and Rachel brought a special academic rigour to Micro-phonics. The £5,000 from the First Step Award was an ideal opportunity to engage for a short period of time the College of Arts and to develop the foundations of a longer term partnership.”

Rachel also praised the scope of the project, saying: “Engaging with business such as Micro-phonics is an excellent opportunity for us as academics. Our research is very relevant to a variety of sectors such as businesses that are based around verbal communication and it is rewarding to be able to contribute directly to the development of such a dynamic company.”

Micro-Phonics Limited‌‌


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Developing a digital portal at Kelvin Hall

HATII in the College of Arts is involved with developing a digital portal as part of the Kelvin Hall redevelopment.

Kelvin Hall is a project that involves Glasgow Museums, The Hunterian, the University of Glasgow and the National Library of Scotland and it will bring together objects from the collections of each institution. The digital portal that the College of Arts is creating will allow users to search across all the collections to find information from each catalogue.

This isn’t as easy as it sounds, because at the moment each institution has different cataloguing practices and different ways of describing their objects. In order to bring the material together it must be standardised. This means that HATII must work closely with each partner institution to make sure that the right information is recorded and included.

Once this unified system has been developed, they will start to think about more exciting ways of representing the data of the catalogues. For example, they would like to produce geo-political maps representing the origins and history of the collections.

Project Partners: 
Kelvin Hall (Glasgow Museums, National Library of Scotland, The Hunterian)

Academic: 
Dr Ian Anderson


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Using Digital technologies in linguistic analysis

According to Dr Jennifer Smith, we are in the midst of yet another revolution in the analysis of speech data through access to Digital technologies. In order to analyse dialects, linguists still go out into the field armed with recorders, but these are now state of the art DAT machines which fit in a pocket yet provide studio quality sound.

New technology means that linguists are able to turn to a text to speech synthesised software in the creation of easily searchable corpus data. And they no longer need to plough through vowel measurements by hand, painstakingly coding each sound. Instead they can run the data through ‘forced alignment’ software which turns 200 hours of man hours into one hour of automated analysis.

Academic: 
Dr Jennifer Smith


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Militia Jacket: Uncovered and Conserved

A rare survival of an early nineteenth century militia jacket came to light as a result of research being carried out in preparation for an exhibition at the University of Glasgow’s Hunterian Art Gallery on Captain Laskey who was the author of the Hunterian’s first catalogue but was also a soldier in the Galloway Militia regiment.  The militia jacket found in the Dumfries collection was an example of the clothing worn by the Galloway militia and has generated much interest.

In collaboration with the University of Glasgow’s Centre for Textile Conservation and Technical Art History, the Dumfries Museum staff arranged for the jacket to be conserved as it would provide an excellent learning experience for one of the final year MPhil Textile Conservation students.  Extensive research and documentation was carried out involving liaison with Dumfries Museum’s curatorial staff, the University of Glasgow’s conservation and research staff and National Museums of Scotland curators to build a picture of the jacket’s history to inform the conservation.  This interdisciplinary collaboration enabled a significant piece of material culture to be better understood and preserved for future study and display.

Images: Top right - before conservation. Above right - after conservation.

Project Partner: Dumfries Museum

Academic:

Karen Thompson, Liz Hancock
 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Conservation of Textile Fragments Dating from the 7th-9th Century

The aim of the project is to conserve textile fragments dating from the 7th-9th century excavated from two Nubian cemetery sites in Kulubnarti, Sudan. The project was initiated by Julie Anderson, Curator in the Department of Ancient Egypt and the Sudan, and Anna Harrison.


The principal opportunity is to establish a mutually beneficial collaboration which has the potential to develop and grow into the long term. As well as gaining crucial theoretical and practical experience of archaeological textiles, students have the opportunity to gain an insight into the motivations and working methods of a large institution. For the British Museum, this is a great opportunity to have some fascinating textiles conserved which otherwise might remain untreated; to add to existing knowledge about their collection; to gain experience in teaching and the organisation of such a project; and to maintain valuable links with colleagues at the Universityof Glasgow.

Partner:

The British Museum

Academic:

Sarah Foskett


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Closing the Digital Curation Gap (CDCG)

Over the past decade, a significant gap has emerged between the research and development in digital curation, on the one hand, and professional practices of archivists, librarians, and museum curators, on the other. There are now many viable applications, models, strategies, and standards for long-term care of digital objects. However, many institutions with a mandate to do this work are either unaware of the options or currently unable to evaluate and implement them.

There is a need to test, refine and diffuse existing innovations into professional practice. HATII is a core partner in the CDCG project which created guidance and tools to support the cultural heritage repository community, and especially staff in small to medium-sized institutions, to undertake more confidently curation related activity. Partners included the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina, Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), Library of Congress, and the Strategic Content Alliance (SCA).

Website:

http://digitalcurationexchange.org/


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Collaboration on Clarifying the Costs of Curation (4C)

The 4C project brings together 13 agencies in 7 different countries so that organizations can approach their investment in the curation and preservation of their cultural heritage and scientific information with greater certainty and with greater clarity about what they will receive in return.
The 4c project is co-funded by European Union under the 7th Framework programme for research and technological development and demonstration activities and will run from February 1, 2013 until January 31, 2015. Partners include HATII, Digital Preservation Coalition, Danish National Archives, German National Library, Institute for System and Computer Engineering in Portugal, Keep Solutions, and the National Library of Estonia.

Website:

www.4cproject.eu/


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Digital Curator Vocational Education Europe Project

DigCurV is a project funded by the European Commission’s Leonardo da Vinci programme designed to establish a curriculum framework for vocational training in digital curation. Following on in HATII’s strong suite of digital curation projects, DigCurV has addressed the availability of vocational training for digital curators in the library, archive, museum and cultural heritage sectors needed to develop new skills that are essential for the long-term management of digital collections. Building on research identifying the key skills and competences required of digital curators, HATII has established a curriculum framework from which training programmes can be developed in future. We are in the process of disseminating the framework to policy and decision makers to raise awareness of the curriculum and promote its exploitation. Our partners include Vilniaus Universiteto Biblioteka (Lithuania), Fondazione Rinascimento Digitale (Italy), Nestor Qualification Consortium (Goettingen State and University Library, Germany) as well as Institute of Museum and Library Services (USA) and Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC).

Website:

www.digcurv.gla.ac.uk/


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Mobilising Mapping

The Mapping Sculpture database contains over 50,000 records relating to sculptural practice between 1851 and 1951. This includes information on around: 3,500 sculptors; another 2,750 related practitioners; 10,000 trades connected to sculpture; 15,000 objects; 125 art schools; 120 art societies; 1,300 exhibitions; 700 other events such as sculpture courses, lectures and discussions; some 16,000 addresses for artists and businesses; and about 350,000 relationships connecting these different types of record together.
Providing a new dimension to the original Mapping Sculpture project, Mobilising Mapping saw the development of innovative personalisation features, social media integration, and a novel web interface optimised for mobile phone access.
The launch of the mobile interface took place at the Mapping Sculpture conference held at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London in 2011 and was promoted by means of in exhibitions and displays in the project’s partner institutions: ‘Mapping Sculpture: Meetings – Materials – Makers’ (V&A, November 2010-May 2011) and ‘Mapping the Practices of Sculpture’ (Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, October 2010-October 2011).

Website:

http://m.sculpture.gla.ac.uk/

 


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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The William Collins Archive

The partnership between HarperCollins and the University to preserve the William Collins, Sons & Co Ltd Archive allows HarperCollins to draw on its rich heritage to support future growth and protect its assets. At the same time, researchers are provided with access to these unique resources which document the development of this publishing giant.
HarperCollins traces its British roots to 1819, when William Collins established his printing and publishing business in Glasgow. From its beginnings publishing religious texts and reference works, the company developed the market for popular editions of classical literature before moving into the publication of original fiction. Collins established itself as a key figure in the international market publishing authors including Agatha Christie, JRR Tolkien, CS Lewis and Enid Blyton.

Partner:

HarperCollins

Group:

University of Glasgow Archive Services


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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National Inventory Research Project (NIRP)

The University houses the National Inventory Research Project, which since 2003 has helped curators in over 200 museums across Britain research their Old Master paintings. The project is an initiative of the UK museum sector, which has attracted over £900,000 in grants, employing over 30 trained art historians to undertake new research and creating up-to-date records on over 9,000 paintings.
The project outcomes are published on the Visual Arts Data Service as NICE Paintings: the National Inventory of Continental European Paintings and available through the BBC website Your Paintings. Research is thus disseminated worldwide, promoting museum collections and providing a resource for researchers, curators and the general public.
NIRP’s current project ‘NIRP in the North’ is working with curators and collections in the city art galleries of Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds and York to recatalogue 1,000 of their old master paintings.

Project Partners:
National Gallery, London

Academic:
Andrew Greg


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Art Detective - previously Oil Painting Expert Network (OPEN)

The College of Arts is the academic partner of the Public Catalogue Foundation (PCF) in its newly launched project, Art Detective. This public engagement project allows members of the public, curators across the UK, and experts around the world to interact in public discussions about the UK’s art collections and improve information about them.
Curators are able to ask a network of experts and specialists from academia, museums and the art trade, as well as the interested members of the public, to make suggestions about information missing from their paintings, for example attributions of authorship and the identity of sitters or locations.
Anyone can make suggestions for new or improved information about oil paintings in public ownership in the UK via links from the Your Paintings website.
Academics from the College of Arts worked with the PCF on the design, and continue to work on the implementation and monitoring, of Art Detective.

Partner:
Public Catalogue Foundation

Academic:
Andrew Greg


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Your Paintings Tagger

The pioneering crowd-sourcing project Your Paintings Tagger was developed by the Public Catalogue Foundation (PCF) in collaboration with the College of Arts.
The Tagger uses the skills and brainpower of the general public to generate descriptive tags for the 211,000 images of oil paintings in UK public collections on the BBC/PCF website Your Paintings. These tags will allow Your Paintings to be fully searched and filtered by the content and style of the paintings.
Since its launch in 2011, the Tagger has attracted over 11,000 taggers who have generated nearly 6 million tags. Over 23,000 paintings have been tagged with an average of 30 descriptive terms and are ready for inclusion on Your Paintings.

Partner:
Public Catalogue Foundation

Website:
http://tagger.thepcf.org.uk/

Academic:
Andrew Greg


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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National Collecting Scheme Scotland

Paisley Museum and Art Gallery is one of seven museums and galleries in Scotland which participated in the National Collecting Scheme Scotland between 2003-2013, helping the partners to acquire more than 200 works of contemporary art and craft.
Since 2007, Dr Tina Fiske has supported Andrea Kusel, Curator of Art at Paisley, to pursue further acquisitions of contemporary art, undertake research travel, and participate in a programme of studio and gallery visits and events organized by the College.
The scheme has provided Paisley with external funding to support their collection as well as offering peer networks to share and develop curatorial practice. The next stage, ‘Affiliate’, will provide a new phase of peer development activity for 2013-2015.

Project Partners:
Paisley Museum and Art Gallery

Academic:
Dr Tina Fiske


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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Curating an exhibition on human-animal relations

Dr Sarah Cockram from the College of Arts has worked with academics from the University of Edinburgh and curators at the Talbot Rice Gallery and National Museums Scotland on an upcoming exhibition. The exhibition will explore the relationship between humans and animals before Charles Darwin. This exhibition relates directly to Dr Cockram’s work in History on the relationship between humans and animals in late medieval and early modern Europe.

Dr Cockram’s work often features images from early veterinary medicine texts, sculptures on animal tombs, and paintings of rulers with animals. She would like to pursue this connection between her work and the visual arts further in the future by commissioning new works of art that respond to early modern specimens and exhibits. 

Project Partners:
University of Edinburgh, Talbot Rice Gallery, National Museums Scotland

Academic:
Dr Sarah Cockram


To learn more about this project or to discuss developing a partnership with the College of Arts please contact Dr Fraser Rowan the College of Arts Business Development manager by email or phone (0141 330 3885).

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